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Old 07-26-2010, 06:53 PM
 
Location: Tennessee/Michigan
28,205 posts, read 47,602,006 times
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The explosive growth of the USA's older population is fueling a grass-roots "village" movement in neighborhoods across the country to help people age in their own homes.

More than 50 villages in a neighbor-helping-neighbor system have sprouted in the past decade from California and Colorado to Nebraska and Massachusetts.

'Villages' let elderly grow old at home - USATODAY.com
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Old 07-26-2010, 09:17 PM
 
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Interesting. Thanks for the link.
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Old 07-29-2010, 11:01 AM
 
Location: Illinois
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WOW, I would love to have something like that in Central Ill or Arkansas.
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Old 07-29-2010, 02:21 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,546 posts, read 39,924,861 times
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Quote:
WOW, I would love to have something like that in Central Ill or Arkansas.
(how about KS?) Retirement Your Way - Co-Housing Might Be Your Answer Arkansas City KS - Arkansas City KS, retirement planning, Arkansas City KS retirement plan, Arkansas City KS financial planning, Arkansas City KS saving for retirement, Arkansas City KS co-housing (http://local.topretirements.com/Retirement_Your_Way_Co_Housing_Might_Be_Your_Answe r_Arkansas_City_KS-r1332730-Arkansas_City_KS.html - broken link)
GIS "Aging in Place" Atlas of Central Illinois - Department of Geography - Geology

Search NORC (Naturally Occurring Retirement Communities)
Retirement community - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
NORC Blueprint :: Home Page :: United Hospital Fund
Senior Resource for Aging in Place
Case Study for NORC http://cje.net/Document.Doc?&id=298 (broken link) (Warning for 'dail-up', .pdf link)

and sample case study / support from Beacon Hill (Boston, as mentioned in article)
Seniors Finding That It Does Take a Village - The Best Life (usnews.com)
A senior-care concept redefines community - The Boston Globe

There are several 'non-profits' working on similar 'affordable' (not subsidized) senior living models.
I currently am exploring co-op centric, as removing the 'capitalistic' incentive drives costs down and participation up, (hence USDA reporting longevity in Co-op is 10 more yrs of Living Independently); but co-op = social barrier in USA. (Europe and Canada are MUCH more co-op supportive). Interesting, is the great benefit Mondragon Cooperative brought to Basque and Catalonia Spain, during a period of very difficult economic and social challenge. As previously mentioned, they were one of my 'Star' highly technical, competent, and responsive suppliers from all world-wide sources, so I know it (co-op) can work and be of great economic and social benefit.

Your mileage / interest may vary.
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Old 07-29-2010, 04:18 PM
 
Location: SoCal desert
8,093 posts, read 13,227,512 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post

Your mileage / interest may vary.
Oh yes.
It makes me shudder to think of living in a commune again.
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Old 07-29-2010, 10:27 PM
 
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The number of "intentional" communities is growing at a pretty good clip, that said, we all know the fears of growing old in a society that favors youth and self indulgence. Arizona has some very supportive communities of seniors that wanted to band together for the common good, some are expensive but others have adjusted the collective contribution down to a manageable number for most.

I'm thinking of checking out some of these communities for the immediate benefit of having a network of like minded individuals working toward a better living situation. Retirement is fine when you first start out but in the later years you can easily be isolated from the greater community around you. I don't think the young folks will ever be amenable to the level of care needed by their elders, we'll have to take care of each other as well as we can.
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Old 08-01-2010, 02:01 PM
 
Location: Texas
1,770 posts, read 2,020,084 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jertheber View Post

Retirement is fine when you first start out but in the later years you can easily be isolated from the greater community around you. I don't think the young folks will ever be amenable to the level of care needed by their elders, we'll have to take care of each other as well as we can.

Well said.
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Old 08-01-2010, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,923,045 times
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The conceptual problem with most of these places is that they rely on volunteer help from younger seniors to help really old seniors:

<<Ed and Margaret Missiaen, both retired and in their late 60s, are Capitol Hill Village members who volunteer. Margaret has cleaned Phinisee's [she's 90+] garden. Ed has helped fix her windows. They're counting on the village to help them when the time comes.>>

How many of you 50-75 year old people are helping your own elderly parents with things like their gardening - or fixing their windows? I'm 62 - my husband's 65 - and we're not even getting on ladders to fix things in our own house! As for cleaning out someone else's garden - it's hard enough to do the easy stuff we do ourselves (we hire professionals for the heavy duty work).

Also - I think the most physically demanding part of elder care is moving mobility impaired people - especially larger men. We used to take my FIL out of his nursing home at least once a week. He needed a wheelchair. And getting him into/out of the car called for some heavy lifting. Both my husband and I had to help him - and my husband threw his back out a couple of times giving assistance. And this was when we were in our 50's - and my FIL only weighed about 150 pounds. How many "junior seniors" are going to volunteer to lift "senior seniors" who aren't family in/out of cars?

Finally - when *you* need help - do you always want to rely on the "kindness of strangers"? Who may not be around to help you do something - or do it when it's convenient for you. A substantial number of people we know who are our age have paid or are paying dues in terms of taking care of their own elderly parents. When these parents die - I think the last thing any of us would want to do is take care of a stranger (especially if that stranger had kids who refused to help them). Robyn
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Old 08-01-2010, 05:04 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,969,510 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
The conceptual problem with most of these places is that they rely on volunteer help from younger seniors to help really old seniors:

<<Ed and Margaret Missiaen, both retired and in their late 60s, are Capitol Hill Village members who volunteer. Margaret has cleaned Phinisee's [she's 90+] garden. Ed has helped fix her windows. They're counting on the village to help them when the time comes.>>

How many of you 50-75 year old people are helping your own elderly parents with things like their gardening - or fixing their windows? I'm 62 - my husband's 65 - and we're not even getting on ladders to fix things in our own house! As for cleaning out someone else's garden - it's hard enough to do the easy stuff we do ourselves (we hire professionals for the heavy duty work).

Also - I think the most physically demanding part of elder care is moving mobility impaired people - especially larger men. We used to take my FIL out of his nursing home at least once a week. He needed a wheelchair. And getting him into/out of the car called for some heavy lifting. Both my husband and I had to help him - and my husband threw his back out a couple of times giving assistance. And this was when we were in our 50's - and my FIL only weighed about 150 pounds. How many "junior seniors" are going to volunteer to lift "senior seniors" who aren't family in/out of cars?

Finally - when *you* need help - do you always want to rely on the "kindness of strangers"? Who may not be around to help you do something - or do it when it's convenient for you. A substantial number of people we know who are our age have paid or are paying dues in terms of taking care of their own elderly parents. When these parents die - I think the last thing any of us would want to do is take care of a stranger (especially if that stranger had kids who refused to help them). Robyn
Hi, I'm visiting from over on the "retiring on a shoestring" thread. This thread is interesting and as you point out above, we have to be really practical about choices and visualize the actual day to day of a situation. I think we could use some "villages" for seniors that also have units for nursing and pre-med and med students who would live among us at a reduced cost on contract to help us all out on the basics of living when we're at or past a certain age and ability. As you say, seniors are NOT going to be able to help out seniors!! But look at all the underemployed nursing and med students who could get through their years of training by being in a senior village and helping and learning firsthand! They might even be able to get college credit for it! ('course they'll have to party somewhere else, or else invite us over! )
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Old 08-01-2010, 05:55 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,923,045 times
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I don't know how things work in other parts of the country - but here in the greater JAX area - you find the medical school students/residents - and all types of nursing students - to the extent that they have time to work - working/getting their credits in fairly pricey places - like the Mayo Clinic. Or the SNF where my FIL was a resident (this SNF trained its own CNAs - who spent their training years in the SNF). Or even Shands/UF Florida hospital (which is perhaps the most expensive place in town because it subsidizes so many indigent people). These are all medical facilities. Why on earth would a person training in a medical field spend his/her time weeding someone's garden or fixing windows? Note that Florida law doesn't allow medical professionals in training like this to do anything except under the supervision of a licensed medical professional. IOW - if you think you're going to get any medical care from unlicensed medical professionals in training on a volunteer basis - you're dreaming. Robyn
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