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Old 08-09-2007, 11:08 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,673 posts, read 33,676,768 times
Reputation: 51867

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I was going through some of my old bookmarks and found the link to the list of places around the country that offer Continued Learning classes and thought I would share. You could browse the list. It's in a ridiculous order so I would recommend once you get to the page, use the Find feature on your Edit menu, type in the name or abbreviation (example: TN or Tennessee) of the State and keep hitting Find Next to see what's available in the State for which you are interested.

Academy of Senior Professionals at Eckerd College (http://www.eckerd.edu/aspec/ein/ilr_usa.html - broken link)

The Continued Learning school that I attend (ORICL) has been one of the best things about moving to my retirement location. In addition to classes, they offer trips. Mine is affiliated with the community college that offers us space and administrative help. We have classes in classrooms and lecture halls. There are workshops and discussion groups. If you are interested in seeing what a retiree program can offer, my school just updated it's website for the Fall semester. When you open the page, you can go to courses link for the Fall semester offering or the Activities link to see the trips for the Fall Semester.

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Old 08-14-2007, 06:44 PM
 
Location: Chicago
21 posts, read 189,330 times
Reputation: 35
Laura,
I've been reading many fo your posts and just was wondering where you moved from and where you settled? I've been looking to move from Chicago and want a little slower pace. Retirement is knocking on my door soon.
I have enjoyed the posts that I have read from you. It sounds like you enjoy the area, wherever that is.
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Old 08-16-2007, 01:48 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,673 posts, read 33,676,768 times
Reputation: 51867
Quote:
Originally Posted by cubsfan View Post
Laura,
I've been reading many fo your posts and just was wondering where you moved from and where you settled? I've been looking to move from Chicago and want a little slower pace. Retirement is knocking on my door soon.
I have enjoyed the posts that I have read from you. It sounds like you enjoy the area, wherever that is.
I live in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. I moved from MD. I'm from NY, originally.

I'm not sure suburban spread out Oak Ridge or the towns in the immediate area are the places to go to from a big city. I think it's a good retirement location for people currently in nerd jobs (scientists, researchers, engineers, etc.) or people with nerd hobbies/interests. I'm a nerd, so I am using the word affectionately. These types work in the area in large numbers and because the Oak Ridge area has a reasonable cost of living, tend to retire in this area. Those people seem to thrive here in retirement because (and this is my opinion from observation) they can still have their hand in their subject matter of expertise in retirement because the community is supportive of it, the town industry (science/technology) is important in the national scheme of things, the town social/educational/recreational events are influenced by the industry, the local newspapers keep them apprised of the latest happenings in their fields, they can continue to participate in professional groups and hear guest speakers.

I'll give you some examples. How many schools for continued learning (retiree schools) that you know offer courses like "Selections From The All-Time Greatest Math Counts Problems," "Oak Ridge National Laboratory: Homeland Security," "The Second Nuclear Era," "Developing New Medicines," "Forensic Anthropology," etc.? I went on a "day trip" two weeks ago to find out how coal, water and wind provides electricity for the area including a trip up a mountain to see the wind turbines and a visit to the city center for a tour of the facities and talks on water/sewage, traffic signal lights, signage, electric poles, etc. There's a nonfiction book group.

The annual town festival this year had a robot, tours of the Graphite Reactor and the nuclear security facility and a reunion for those that worked on the Manhattan Project.

The town (of approximately 28,000) has a science museum. There are cardboard boat races (you have to build your boat out of cardboad and get in it). There are speakers that come here throughout the year to talk on issues that would interest nerd-types.

The town also has a lake, a public fishing pier, an arboretum, 11 greenways, 2 public pools, golf courses, tennis courts, a rowing course, several parks, a community band, a community orchestra, a symphony orchestra, a playhouse, an art center, a children's museum, 2 newspapers, etc.

Of course, the retiree school (trips and courses) and the annual festival offer more than just things that would interest someone from the afore mentioned occupations. The school has art, music, history, literature, economics classes and trips to museums, nature places, concert halls and historical places. The annual festival has arts and crafts, kid stuff, a WWII re-enactment, a fake Elvis, a dog parade, karate demonstration, etc., along with the usual fair stuff.

But the point is, I think people who retire and move should be driven primarily by what they want to do in retirement and what they like to do more than by weather or cheap cost of living, for example. I also think professional people like to be around other subject matter experts in their field, even when they are not working anymore, because even though they are leaving the job, it doesn't mean they want to turn their back on their field of interest.

I picked my town first for the type of classes the school offered and because I like to fish and take photographs, and secondly, because it was spread out/suburban, with less than 35,000 people. The other things I like to do (computer related, politics, reading, research) I could do anywhere. I think it's important not to be bored in retirement and there is something going on in this town, just about every week, and that also interests me. I'm really looking forward to the Fall when I can start to explore nearby areas with my camera and attend Fall events.

If you are thinking about moving in retirement, really think about what interests you and then first, find the places where you can indulge in those things easily and frequently. Use other factors (like cost of living, weather, near to an airport, traffic congestion, air quality, etc.) to eliminate places from your list.
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Old 08-16-2007, 08:14 PM
 
Location: Chicago
21 posts, read 189,330 times
Reputation: 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
But the point is, I think people who retire and move should be driven primarily by what they want to do in retirement and what they like to do more than by weather or cheap cost of living, for example. I also think professional people like to be around other subject matter experts in their field, even when they are not working anymore, because even though they are leaving the job, it doesn't mean they want to turn their back on their field of interest.

I picked my town first for the type of classes the school offered and because I like to fish and take photographs, and secondly, because it was spread out/suburban, with less than 35,000 people. The other things I like to do (computer related, politics, reading, research) I could do anywhere. I think it's important not to be bored in retirement and there is something going on in this town, just about every week, and that also interests me. I'm really looking forward to the Fall when I can start to explore nearby areas with my camera and attend Fall events.

If you are thinking about moving in retirement, really think about what interests you and then first, find the places where you can indulge in those things easily and frequently. Use other factors (like cost of living, weather, near to an airport, traffic congestion, air quality, etc.) to eliminate places from your list.
Thanks for taking the time to answer. You makes some excellent points, well worth considering.
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