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Old 07-24-2011, 10:03 PM
 
5,090 posts, read 13,547,490 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
One level - no stairs. That issue plays a prominate role in this thread. I am intrigued by how ready people are to concede that they will have trouble with stairs as they age, and I am wondering how many of those people have given up not only on their own mobility but also on the factors which will lead to the loss of mobility such as staying active, going to the gym, and controlling their weight. And yes, I am clear that for some folks there are factors beyond their control; for example I have a friend who has struggled with rhumatoid arthritis since childhood - now at age 66 she is having serious problems with stairs.

If you stop doing something you can lose your ability to do that thing. If you start avoiding stairs and also avoid lower body weight work-outs (especially important for us older folks), well that is a near guarantee that you are going to eventually have trouble with stairs.

I am 67, had hernia surgery a year ago, from which they send you home the same day. My attitude was "Thank heaven for the stairs". By taking them very slowly, one at a time like a 90-year-old would, it gave me that small amount of activity in the first couple of days following surgery which contributed to my rapid healing. I waited two weeks to resume jogging, as per the surgeon's instructions.

Stairs can be a welcome and life-enhancing addition to daily physical activity. Let's not rush to embrace being disabled/crippled.
This is an interesting and well thoughout post. You make many good points that made me think. I am in my 60s and I have severe mobility problems. I live in a ranch home. My parents when they were in their 60s bought a new ranch home and my father who will be 90 is still alive. We both have stairs to the basement but with grab bars to help provide more support.

I am very happy that we both live in a ranch home because of all the issues that everyone has pointed out as to the difficulties when you age. However, there is one more issue that needs to be talked about more is safety. For as you age, especially when you have more physical problems, you will suffer some balance issues. Falls in the home, increased by the use of stairs can be severe and even deadly for the elderly.

Yes, your points hit a good issue about exercise but I would not want to have increased risk in the home for the small advantages of exercise by the necessity of using stairs.

Livecontent
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Old 07-25-2011, 05:44 AM
 
147 posts, read 206,200 times
Reputation: 138
[quote=Escort Rider;
I am 67, had hernia surgery a year ago, from which they send you home the same day. My attitude was "Thank heaven for the stairs". By taking them very slowly, one at a time like a 90-year-old would, it gave me that small amount of activity in the first couple of days following surgery which contributed to my rapid healing. I waited two weeks to resume jogging, as per the surgeon's instructions.

Well, here's how a lot of 90 year old take the stairs: not at all. My mother at 85 couldn't use them at all. Just sayin'.
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Old 07-25-2011, 01:52 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
13,888 posts, read 25,323,560 times
Reputation: 26385
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
One level - no stairs. That issue plays a prominate role in this thread. I am intrigued by how ready people are to concede that they will have trouble with stairs as they age, and I am wondering how many of those people have given up not only on their own mobility but also on the factors which will lead to the loss of mobility such as staying active, going to the gym, and controlling their weight. And yes, I am clear that for some folks there are factors beyond their control; for example I have a friend who has struggled with rhumatoid arthritis since childhood - now at age 66 she is having serious problems with stairs.

If you stop doing something you can lose your ability to do that thing. If you start avoiding stairs and also avoid lower body weight work-outs (especially important for us older folks), well that is a near guarantee that you are going to eventually have trouble with stairs.

I am 67, had hernia surgery a year ago, from which they send you home the same day. My attitude was "Thank heaven for the stairs". By taking them very slowly, one at a time like a 90-year-old would, it gave me that small amount of activity in the first couple of days following surgery which contributed to my rapid healing. I waited two weeks to resume jogging, as per the surgeon's instructions.

Stairs can be a welcome and life-enhancing addition to daily physical activity. Let's not rush to embrace being disabled/crippled.
Just because I bought a 1 story home doesn't mean I don't believe in exercise and physical activity. I walk, run, swim pretty much every day plus I have an active job. I believe use it or lose it is true. When I can afford it, I'm going to get a bike too.

I firmly believe retirement homes with stairs are a mistake. I don't want to be 'rushed' into a nursing home because I can no longer navigate my home safely. Having a home with no stairs will most likely allow me to live longer without assistance. And what if my partner becomes ill and needs my constant care. I'll do better and last longer if I don't have to go up and down stairs constantly.

The bedroom on the first floor is a good idea. But why pay taxes, heating, and cooling for what is essentially a storage space, not a living area?

If I need exercise and stairclimbing, that's easy to get. If my home has stairs I can't navigate, I'm stuck!
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Old 07-25-2011, 03:09 PM
 
29,782 posts, read 34,867,277 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jkgourmet View Post
Some would say that Buying a house that is large enough for "the kids" to move in is a great reason NOT to buy that house!
Since they are both college graduates with wives who are college graduates and they own their own homes that they put down considerable down payments on I know it would only be for a very good reason. I understand your point.
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Old 07-25-2011, 03:10 PM
 
29,782 posts, read 34,867,277 times
Reputation: 11705
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
One level - no stairs. That issue plays a prominate role in this thread. I am intrigued by how ready people are to concede that they will have trouble with stairs as they age, and I am wondering how many of those people have given up not only on their own mobility but also on the factors which will lead to the loss of mobility such as staying active, going to the gym, and controlling their weight. And yes, I am clear that for some folks there are factors beyond their control; for example I have a friend who has struggled with rhumatoid arthritis since childhood - now at age 66 she is having serious problems with stairs.

If you stop doing something you can lose your ability to do that thing. If you start avoiding stairs and also avoid lower body weight work-outs (especially important for us older folks), well that is a near guarantee that you are going to eventually have trouble with stairs.

I am 67, had hernia surgery a year ago, from which they send you home the same day. My attitude was "Thank heaven for the stairs". By taking them very slowly, one at a time like a 90-year-old would, it gave me that small amount of activity in the first couple of days following surgery which contributed to my rapid healing. I waited two weeks to resume jogging, as per the surgeon's instructions.

Stairs can be a welcome and life-enhancing addition to daily physical activity. Let's not rush to embrace being disabled/crippled.
One of the things we love about our house are the two master bedrooms one up and one down.
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Old 07-25-2011, 05:27 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,975,704 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PatRoy1 View Post
Our new home is near walking/biking trails, bus service, shopping, library, and not too far from a university with a program for seniors.

Still, it has stairs. Only two steps to get into the main floor and bedroom on main floor. Still, when we are no longer able to do stairs, we will likely have to move anyway, as we will probably be looking at an assisted living arrangement. We figure that having a home that will be easier to sell will come in handy then.
Your new place sounds great. I do have to chuckle a little at all of our fear of "stairs" at our age--when I think of my mother at 90 and her beautiful legs as she had to climb a full flight of stairs to her bedroom and the only bath in the house. Boy was she in shape, even at 90. When we forced her to move to a one-floor small ranch she went downhill really fast, as she got no exercise whatsoever. My mother, of old-world heritage, reminded me of the little old ladies I saw in Italy who walk everywhere in skirts and heels, up and down cobblestone streets and stairs everywhere! And their legs are like those of 30 year olds!
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Old 07-25-2011, 07:25 PM
 
1,588 posts, read 1,974,804 times
Reputation: 2200
Now remember folks there are stairlifts, they are readily available both new and used (unfortunately many people who need them don't wind up using them for long) and you may qualify at your time of need for one to get one free of cost or for a minimal cost.

If your handy they are relatively easy to install, Craigslist usually has a bunch of second hand one's for sale at any given time.
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Old 07-25-2011, 07:42 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,975,704 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShouldIMoveOrStayPut...? View Post
Now remember folks there are stairlifts, they are readily available both new and used (unfortunately many people who need them don't wind up using them for long) and you may qualify at your time of need for one to get one free of cost or for a minimal cost.

If your handy they are relatively easy to install, Craigslist usually has a bunch of second hand one's for sale at any given time.
I think most seniors would rather live on one floor than use a stairlift. It keeps is more independent. I am just starting to be able to use the stairs again, after a long term of physical therapy for a mobility challenge. It feels great to be able to do this kind of activity again, I though I never would. My physical therapist says that for my condition, the more stairs I can climb, the better, even if slow. Stair climbing, if one is able to do it under the advice of a doctor or PT, is one of the very best exercises there is for the heart.
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Old 07-25-2011, 07:44 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,932,349 times
Reputation: 18050
Even with the added expense of a stair lift it sin't the same as the easy of one floor nor is it has sfae expeaily if sleepig upstaires. For younger year the added quaitness od upsatirs makes sense but even then its alot more trouble becaises expense to heat and cool effciently.I know I had a upsatirs for years. I older age it wuickly become a real pain eve when not disabled. They are cheaper to build and take less room per sq footage of property.
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Old 07-26-2011, 12:22 AM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ > Raleigh, NC
15,070 posts, read 19,013,423 times
Reputation: 24177
Quote:
Originally Posted by TuborgP View Post
Since they are both college graduates with wives who are college graduates and they own their own homes that they put down considerable down payments on I know it would only be for a very good reason. I understand your point.
Sounds like you raised a couple of smart, responsible kids, Tuborg. Not easy to do these days. Congratulations!
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