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Old 09-07-2011, 03:17 PM
 
Location: Manassas, VA
1,559 posts, read 3,186,053 times
Reputation: 839

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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Say a contractor is rebuilding my stairway and he sends over two guys who work for him to do it. Are you saying that if I pay the GC and he doesn't wind up paying them, that the 2 workers could file a lien on my property?

On #2, if I pay the GC for materials "he will buy" and he puts those materials on his general account at the vendor's, and doesn't wind up paying his bill, the vendor can come after me for payment?

( I do not mean to swerve off-topic, but seems like a lot of us retirees would want to know all this)
I believe that's what is being said....

Just gone done talking to my husband about everything and how maybe it would be wise for us to get the house to the point where we can move in on the basement level and spend the next couple of years paying as we go and/or doing some of the work ourselves. That way - we have no mortgage to worry about.... We can afford the cash out of pocket to get to that point....whatever that point actually is! lol!
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Old 09-07-2011, 03:27 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,985,208 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by vermonter16 View Post
I believe that's what is being said....

Just gone done talking to my husband about everything and how maybe it would be wise for us to get the house to the point where we can move in on the basement level and spend the next couple of years paying as we go and/or doing some of the work ourselves. That way - we have no mortgage to worry about.... We can afford the cash out of pocket to get to that point....whatever that point actually is! lol!
How dreary would it be to live in the basement?? Of course you will need a kitchen and bathroom. Will it be damp and moldy? Looking at your user name, will your place be in Vermont (I ask b/c it's mighty damp and cold in the winter in NE). I wonder if a nice small mobile home on the property would work better? You also might be able to get work done more affordably by young contractors just starting out. My son did a lot of my work at $25/hr plus mateirals, just before striking out on his own from a carpenter job. He and his carpenter partner did a top notch job on what they had time to do.
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Old 09-07-2011, 03:30 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,985,208 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by PDD View Post
Are you aware of the exterior maintenance a log home requires? At 60+ does your husband want to be climbing a ladder every five years to "treat" the exterior.
Cover the log home with pitch. Isn't that what the settlers did?
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Old 09-07-2011, 03:55 PM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,500 posts, read 62,199,370 times
Reputation: 32187
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Say a contractor is rebuilding my stairway and he sends over two guys who work for him to do it. Are you saying that if I pay the GC and he doesn't wind up paying them, that the 2 workers could file a lien on my property?
No. With the caveat that they are actual employees on the GC's payroll.

This also raises the issue of Workman's Comp issues about people on site.
Another detail to have YOUR lawyer be certain is defined in the contract...
(that the GC have a broad WC policy that indemnifies you).

Quote:
On #2, if I pay the GC for materials "he will buy" and he puts those materials on his general account at the vendor's, and doesn't wind up paying his bill, the vendor can come after me for payment?
Again #2 example is more typical of construction loans vs home improvements.

But this is why they are called "contractors"...
Everything depends on the nature of the contract. Everything.

And every state (and often County/Town) has different rules.

Forewarned ... Forearmed and all that
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Old 09-08-2011, 05:10 AM
 
Location: Manassas, VA
1,559 posts, read 3,186,053 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
How dreary would it be to live in the basement?? Of course you will need a kitchen and bathroom. Will it be damp and moldy? Looking at your user name, will your place be in Vermont (I ask b/c it's mighty damp and cold in the winter in NE). I wonder if a nice small mobile home on the property would work better? You also might be able to get work done more affordably by young contractors just starting out. My son did a lot of my work at $25/hr plus mateirals, just before striking out on his own from a carpenter job. He and his carpenter partner did a top notch job on what they had time to do.
LOL, Actually - we have such a slope that it will be a full daylight walkout basement with radiant heating under the floor. So - it won't actually be fully underground. Kind of like the townhome I live in now. You walk in on the bottom level - walk towards the back and that's where it goes underground.

We can put in our own bathroom after the plumbing is down there and a kitchen can be minimal for us for a little while. It won't be dreary at all! I have looked into a small mobile home though. My biggest concern is our cats being happy .
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Old 09-08-2011, 06:42 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,985,208 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
No. With the caveat that they are actual employees on the GC's payroll.

How does a homeowner actually know that the workers are really on the GC's payroll? What if the GC has illegals, or just a loose relationship that pays under the table, etc and the GC defaults on paying them? (I have to know b/c I've never had outside workers do anything on a house, only family members--and know I do need to have a contractor for a bit of rebuilding and repair).


This also raises the issue of Workman's Comp issues about people on site.
Another detail to have YOUR lawyer be certain is defined in the contract...
(that the GC have a broad WC policy that indemnifies you).

So every time I have work done on my house I have to have a contract drawn up that I have to pay a lawyer to look over??
^^^
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Old 09-08-2011, 07:02 AM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,500 posts, read 62,199,370 times
Reputation: 32187
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl
How does...
What if...
I have to know
...
So every time...
Everything one might do that involves inviting others on to their property ranging from hiring the kid next door to mow grass and rake leaves up through a major renovation requiring multiple licensed sub contractors... will come with risks of many varieties (to the homeowner) that in most instances never lead to anything of a serious nature...

But they all sure can escalate into serious problems.
That escalation of problems usually happens when there is an imbalance in understanding between parties.
(sort of like in a bad marriage)

This is why the practice of contracts laying out the specifics were created; most based in common law.
This is why states and counties often require licensing to contract for hire (which usually means insurance).
This is why lawyers still review and advise even on the "it's a standard contract ma'am".
This is why basic homeowners insurance will include specific limitations.
This is why insurance agents sell umbrella policies and other additional coverages.

Shall I go on?

Last edited by MrRational; 09-08-2011 at 07:11 AM..
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Old 09-08-2011, 07:14 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,985,208 times
Reputation: 15649
Mr.R, thanks for the input. I hope the OP, Margeaa, is still with us and wants to hear more about what we think in answer to her question.
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Old 09-10-2011, 08:49 PM
 
78 posts, read 368,421 times
Reputation: 55
I'm still here! Sorry I haven't responded to this thread since I started it...but I've enjoyed everybody's input. We decided on buying the 2 story, 3 bedroom, 2-1/2 bath house. Were in contract...but the house inspection showed some things wrong with the house..the seller refused to pay for anything..and we backed out of the contract. So...we are back to looking for a house. We are focusing on a one-story home...but will still consider a two story, if the master bedroom is on the first floor.

We are presently renting a 2 bedroom, 2 bath house while we search for our next home. We had out-of-state guests this summer...mostly family...and, sometimes, it would have been nice to have had a third bedroom. Not totally necessary...but it would have been more comfortable for my guests. However, this home is one story...and I must admit it is a lot easier...our last home was 3 stories and there were days when my knees were hurting from going up and down the stairs all day. My husband has neuropathy and has difficulty going up and down stairs...so he's very happy with the one story now. However, he's ok with a 2 story, as long as the master bedroom and bath, and an "office" spot for him is on the first floor.

Will keep you posted. And thanks for everyone's input!
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Old 09-11-2011, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,744,100 times
Reputation: 32309
Default One story versus two story

A real estate agent posted in the Real Estate Forum recently that one-story homes are in short supply and may be difficult to find. The theory was that so many two-story homes were built during the real estate bubble (2000-2007) but now baby boomers who are beginning to retire are downsizing, selling their two-story homes and looking for one-story ones, hence the high demand (and short supply) for those. Of course all real estate markets are local; I am wondering if the OP has found this to be the case.
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