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Old 08-12-2011, 11:50 AM
 
28,231 posts, read 39,866,600 times
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Mrs. Tek and I are leaning towards a Del Webb type community for a number of reasons. One of them are THE COVENANTS as noted above. Why? Well, let me tell you about the area around me.

When we moved in the neighborhood was well taken care of, neighbors were friendly and fun to be around. We could come home from work, sit in the driveway and within an hour have it full of the neighbors and their children having a good time. Now we barely know them, the yards are a mess, people with four or five cars block the sidewalk because they park them in the drive and street instead of the garage, which is full of junk.

We want to live in an area where every drive way doesn't have a basketball hoop in it. Where the yard behind us doesn't have a basketball court in it. Where the yard next door looks like a junk yard in those areas where it doesn't look like a migrants garden. Where we aren't constantly bombarded with balls, Frisbees, etc coming over are fence at all hours, with the resultant door bell ring asking for it all back. Where I can sit in my back yard without having to constantly dodge all that stuff coming over the fence. Where we can find people that are intelligent, care about their home and yard, and don't think the entire world should revolve around their spoiled kids.

We want some control. If an HOA is what it takes I'm all for it.

And we were impressed with Sun City Anthem. If we move there I want the same view KiwiKate has from her back yard.
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Old 08-12-2011, 12:51 PM
 
29,764 posts, read 34,848,700 times
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I am hoping to have my wife consider a Del Webb in about 10-12 years when we hit our mid 70's or there abouts. I have visited the Del Webb in Cary and have driven by the Sun City community.
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Old 08-12-2011, 01:12 PM
Status: "Support the Mining Law of 1872" (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,570 posts, read 10,909,082 times
Reputation: 19190
Quote:
Originally Posted by AK-Cathy View Post
My in-laws (lovely people but we have nothing in common with them) live in a Del Webb project in Henderson (Vegas) and to me it is a sterile, lifeless piece of hell with neat, well manicured if not overly uniform homes. We never see people outside unless it's to walk pets or jog even in the nicest of weather. Everyone is bunkered in.

While visiting the in-laws a few years ago, we observed a sleek, well groomed, expensive looking couple in brand new matching jogging suits trotting up the hill on Christmas morning as we were off in search of fancy coffee. We watched them sidestep a struggling rabbit ahead of us that had recently been hit by a car (that we mercifully dispatched and moved to the scrub brush) without breaking step or batting an eye over the welfare of a fellow creature in distress.

This spoke volumes to me and confirmed what we both had felt about the place from the get-go as being a hard, artificial and soulless place that attracted the same in it's people. I realize that it was one incident but it confirmed our observations in general. Though retired and looking for downsizing options, never is a word that I'll use in regard to those kinds of places.
You are so right. Those dystopic hells attract the shallow who become even shallower as a result of community pressure. They have no values or morals beyond what their peer groups give them. I can't even imagine not helping an animal in distress even if the only thing I can offer is as painless a death as possible. It's no fun; it ruins my day, at least. But I've had to do it a number of times and I'll almost certainly be called to do it again.

I do understand the desire to live where there are no children. I hate them and their noise and their doting parents. But living in a pretty prison isn't the only answer. My nearest neighbor is over 1/3 mile. No kid can scream that loud although in this case the folks who live there are long past their child-bearing years. There are so many great rural areas of all descriptions and climates where people can have their way. They can make noise but nobody else can. They can have a private junkyard but no one else can. My dogs can bark with joy when they come in or go out and chase and play at 3 A.M. But the only other dogs I hear are coyotes. The list is endless.

As far as activities are concerned, I don't need someone else to provide them. I could fill every day three times over with things I must or wish to do. Bingo Ceramics I have my animals, my library and the other things that fill my life right here at home. Even my work is here at home.

And the only gate is my personal gate, the one I own.

Planned communities are prep schools for nursing homes.
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Old 08-12-2011, 01:15 PM
 
Location: Maryland
1,534 posts, read 3,779,985 times
Reputation: 2307
We looked at 4 (I think, a mind is a terrible thing to ...) Del Web communities (as well as a bunch of non-Del retirement setups) and generally thought they were pretty nice, just not our cup of tea. We opted to stay put in a non-retirement community situation, at least for the foreseeable future, as a matter of personal preference. I can reiterate some comments from a number of Del inhabitants we've met in our travels.

We do group touring with a company that caters to the US retiree market and have met upwards of 40 or so couples living in Del communities across the US. The general consensus we've heard about them has been very positive. The communities by all accounts are well run and seem to have a high satisfaction component from the folks we've met.

About the only negative I can recall is the situation where folks related that they really didn't use all the recreation facilities available (& included in their monthly fees), for a variety of reasons (health problems, etc.). We've met a number of folks who found that the physically active (tennis, golf, etc.) retirement lifestyle didn't work out for them as originally envisioned. Other than that, I haven't heard any real negatives.

The Del residents we've met fit just about any cross section of the social distribution you might construct regarding political, religious or other non-financially related groupings. Our experience suggests that the Del folks are not any different than any other bunch of age & financially situated similar retirees. That unscientific observation is about all I can offer. JMO

Last edited by Pilgrim21784; 08-12-2011 at 01:30 PM..
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Old 08-12-2011, 01:17 PM
 
8,181 posts, read 11,900,573 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
Those dystopic hells attract the shallow who become even shallower as a result of community pressure. They have no values or morals beyond what their peer groups give them.
I rest my case.
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Old 08-12-2011, 01:50 PM
 
5,822 posts, read 13,308,406 times
Reputation: 9289
Cookie cutter houses, organized clubs are not for everyone. We lived in an HOA for 11 years and have sworn completely off of them. I don't care for the "policing" by board members over tiny, meaningless infractions. AFA the community clubs, several friends who live in these 55+ find at times it is a throw back to junior high school cliques.

For some people these are a good fit...just not for everyone.
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Old 08-12-2011, 03:45 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,723,738 times
Reputation: 32304
Default How about some reasoning to back this up?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
Those dystopic hells attract the shallow who become even shallower as a result of community pressure. They have no values or morals beyond what their peer groups give them. I can't even imagine not helping an animal in distress even if the only thing I can offer is as painless a death as possible. It's no fun; it ruins my day, at least. But I've had to do it a number of times and I'll almost certainly be called to do it again.
How is it you came to your conclusion? Are you basing it on one single example of the jogging couple who ignored an injured rabbit? One couple's actions or lack of actions don't mean anything. How do you know the people in planned communities are shallow? Have you lived in one, or are you just supposing? Does living in the country prove one is not shallow? It's easy to spout judgments without giving a line of reasoning to back them up. How did you choose your user name? You don't sound happy to me; you sound full of resentment and misanthropy. (Full disclosure: I don't live in a planned community and don't plan to, but neither do I believe in knee-jerk categorizations of others.)
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Old 08-12-2011, 04:14 PM
 
28,231 posts, read 39,866,600 times
Reputation: 36735
Quote:
Originally Posted by AK-Cathy View Post
My in-laws (lovely people but we have nothing in common with them) live in a Del Webb project in Henderson (Vegas) and to me it is a sterile, lifeless piece of hell with neat, well manicured if not overly uniform homes. We never see people outside unless it's to walk pets or jog even in the nicest of weather. Everyone is bunkered in.

While visiting the in-laws a few years ago, we observed a sleek, well groomed, expensive looking couple in brand new matching jogging suits trotting up the hill on Christmas morning as we were off in search of fancy coffee. We watched them sidestep a struggling rabbit ahead of us that had recently been hit by a car (that we mercifully dispatched and moved to the scrub brush) without breaking step or batting an eye over the welfare of a fellow creature in distress.

This spoke volumes to me and confirmed what we both had felt about the place from the get-go as being a hard, artificial and soulless place that attracted the same in it's people. I realize that it was one incident but it confirmed our observations in general. Though retired and looking for downsizing options, never is a word that I'll use in regard to those kinds of places.
So you judge an entire community by one couple.

Please don't move anywhere near us.
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Old 08-12-2011, 04:15 PM
 
28,231 posts, read 39,866,600 times
Reputation: 36735
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
You are so right. Those dystopic hells attract the shallow who become even shallower as a result of community pressure. They have no values or morals beyond what their peer groups give them. I can't even imagine not helping an animal in distress even if the only thing I can offer is as painless a death as possible. It's no fun; it ruins my day, at least. But I've had to do it a number of times and I'll almost certainly be called to do it again.

I do understand the desire to live where there are no children. I hate them and their noise and their doting parents. But living in a pretty prison isn't the only answer. My nearest neighbor is over 1/3 mile. No kid can scream that loud although in this case the folks who live there are long past their child-bearing years. There are so many great rural areas of all descriptions and climates where people can have their way. They can make noise but nobody else can. They can have a private junkyard but no one else can. My dogs can bark with joy when they come in or go out and chase and play at 3 A.M. But the only other dogs I hear are coyotes. The list is endless.

As far as activities are concerned, I don't need someone else to provide them. I could fill every day three times over with things I must or wish to do. Bingo Ceramics I have my animals, my library and the other things that fill my life right here at home. Even my work is here at home.

And the only gate is my personal gate, the one I own.

Planned communities are prep schools for nursing homes.
See my previous post.
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Old 08-12-2011, 05:21 PM
 
28,231 posts, read 39,866,600 times
Reputation: 36735
flipsideoffifty,

You have to admit you got quite a range of opinions. Hope something in all this helped you.
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