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Old 03-29-2013, 03:52 PM
 
Location: Ohio
15,159 posts, read 13,423,732 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
A majority of Americans now live in suburban areas across the country. As they age in suburbia (as we age) there is little or no public transportation. Many people do not have relatives at all, or none nearby for necessary driving. I am amazed at how little thought people have given to this. Driving is survival for these people, whether ill-advised or not.
I am struck by the number of accidents that are crazy- people driving through the front lobby of a building, driving into a store- with complaints that they used the wrong pedal or something. These accidents do seem to always be extremely old drivers, like 80s-90s and up.
I worry what will happen as people age in suburbia.
I don't hear of these types of accidents very often, certainly not compared to all of the everyday accidents caused by distracted drivers......yet, when an elderly driver has an accident, it makes the headlines instead of a blip on page four.

I have to wonder, why is that?

IMO, elderly drivers are being targeted because they are easy to identify because of their age.

Whereas, the VAST majority of accidents are caused by non elderly drivers who are usually driving recklessly.......too fast, texting, talking on the phone.

One other question I would like to ask.......all of you who say you would turn in grandpa.....would you turn in a younger family member who you KNOW always texts while driving?

"Officer, my husband always texts while driving and I am afraid he is going to kill someone. You can catch him on his way to work, he will be heading south on Wilson Rd. at 7:35 am. driving a blue Honda Accord.....license number XXX000."

Why would you report one to the police and not the other?
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Old 03-29-2013, 05:04 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,745 posts, read 4,216,058 times
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Per capita rate of passenger vehicle crash involvements by driver age, 2010


Rate of fatal crash involvements among passenger vehicle drivers 70 and older per 100,000 people, 1975-2010

"In terms of fatalities, older drivers are a danger mostly to themselves and their passengers, who also typically are older and thus more vulnerable to injuries. 25, 26, 27, 28 In 2010, 74 percent of people killed in crashes involving a driver 70 or older were either the older driver themselves (61 percent) or their older passengers (13 percent). One study found that, per licensed driver, drivers 75 and older kill fewer pedestrians, bicyclists, motorcyclists and occupants of other vehicles than do drivers ages 30-59 25 . However, drivers 75-79 and older have more insurance claims for damage to other vehicles per insured vehicle year than drivers ages 35-69."

IIHS-HLDI

I would prefer to work with the elderly than automatically assume that a slow, elderly driver needs to have his or her license revoked. For example, there are assistive devices for handicapped drivers that could also help the elderly. Municipalities could add left turn lanes with signals at more intersections, etc. Drivers with poor night vision could continue to drive during the daytime.

Obviously, some elderly would still need to give up the car keys. But I'd wager not nearly as many as some posters seem to think.
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Old 03-29-2013, 05:31 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,732,288 times
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^^^^^ Come on, Lenora! Someone as astute as you (about as astute as people get around here) is bound to realize that per capita accident rates are a very poor indicator of how dangerous drivers are at a given age compared to accident rates per miles driven. The older people get past a certain age, the fewer miles they drive.
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Old 03-29-2013, 07:39 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,745 posts, read 4,216,058 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
^^^^^ Come on, Lenora! Someone as astute as you (about as astute as people get around here) is bound to realize that per capita accident rates are a very poor indicator of how dangerous drivers are at a given age compared to accident rates per miles driven. The older people get past a certain age, the fewer miles they drive.
It's more complicated than that. The older people get the more they avoid highway driving, too. So? Are they actually more likely to injure or kill others than younger drivers? The stats say no.
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Old 03-29-2013, 08:19 PM
 
18,852 posts, read 31,708,488 times
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The issue is NOT older drivers.

The issue is older drivers who have an obvious disability, vision problems, dementia, side effects from medication, and this has been identified by family members as an impediment to activities of daily living, and that includes driving.

This is not a discussion of taking away driving privileges of seniors who have no cognitive or physical problems.

Now, who wants to defend seniors who are legally blind should still be driving?
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Old 03-29-2013, 08:31 PM
 
Location: Chesapeake Bay
6,048 posts, read 3,870,699 times
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The older drivers can get involved in minor accidents though.

My grandfather fit in that category. He was driving in his late 80s. It reached the point that when he drove to town on Saturdays he'd hit a mailbox or fence or sometimes bang into a car. He was well known around town and quite wealthy. Every Sunday afternoon my uncle would drive around with a box of cash paying people off.

The local sheriff was afraid (politics) to do anything about the situation so my uncle finally got a friend from the state troopers to put an end to it all.
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Old 03-29-2013, 09:28 PM
 
125 posts, read 199,074 times
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Serious thread, reminds me of when I was a kid many years ago at this local burger joint. My friend and I were having dinner, the place was empty except for the elderly owner who was tending the cash register, the cook, waitress, and another elderly customer who was seated at the counter talking with the owner. Anyways, the elderly customer after finishing his meal, said his goodbyes to the owner and left. Then out of no where, this huge crashing noise, a car barrels through one of the mostly glass walls and into the restaurant. It was the elderly customer who had just left behind the wheel. He missed my friend and I by about 5 feet or so. The customer who had his windows rolled down, was cussing profusely and seemed like he was ok. The owner "George are you ok?! ", The customer " yeah, I think so..sumbitch,%#&$@" The owner "George I always wanted a drive thru but this ridiculous"

Somehow he put the car on drive versus reverse. He was probably in his eighties. It was quite a scare, since then when I see very elderly people on the road I try to give them space and make sure they see me.
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Old 03-29-2013, 11:00 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,745 posts, read 4,216,058 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jasper12 View Post
The issue is NOT older drivers.

The issue is older drivers who have an obvious disability, vision problems, dementia, side effects from medication, and this has been identified by family members as an impediment to activities of daily living, and that includes driving.

This is not a discussion of taking away driving privileges of seniors who have no cognitive or physical problems.

Now, who wants to defend seniors who are legally blind should still be driving?
I do not know of one driver who is legally blind. I assume you mean one whose vision is worse than 20/200 after correction.

Again, the handicapped have obvious disabilities and side effects from meds are not limited to the elderly. So, what is the problem? If a senior can't see, then he shouldn't drive. But if he can see well enough and is not confused to the degree it interferes with his judgment, then he can probably drive as well as the average drivers on the road.

How about we retest everyone who causes an accident, even the little fender bender? Sounds fair to me.
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Old 03-30-2013, 06:49 AM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,745 posts, read 4,216,058 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
^^^^^ Come on, Lenora! Someone as astute as you (about as astute as people get around here) is bound to realize that per capita accident rates are a very poor indicator of how dangerous drivers are at a given age compared to accident rates per miles driven. The older people get past a certain age, the fewer miles they drive.
Drivers ages 70-79 had approximately the same injury rate per mile driven as drivers ages 30-39, drivers ages 80-84 had driver injury rates per mile driven similar to those of drivers ages 25-59, and drivers ages 85 and older had injury rates per mile driven similar to those of drivers ages 20-24. Mileage-based rates of deaths of other people outside of the subject driverís vehicle followed similar patterns with respect to the subject driverís age as well, with the exception that the rate was lowest for drivers ages 50-59.
https://www.aaafoundation.org/sites/...sk%20FINAL.pdf

Now, excuse me while I conduct further research regarding the impact (pun intended) of airbag deployment on small framed women with osteoporosis.
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Old 03-30-2013, 07:34 AM
 
Location: The South
5,214 posts, read 3,632,069 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Turu View Post
since then when I see very elderly people on the road I try to give them space and make sure they see me.
I think I am one of those type of people,(elderly) and when I see someone, usually a young person with either of his arms held up to the side of his head, driving I try to stay out of their way.
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