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Old 09-11-2011, 02:47 PM
 
Location: Ohio
15,165 posts, read 13,444,634 times
Reputation: 20602

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
The subject of the article stated that she did this to save money for the NHS (British government owned National Health Service). Consequently, we might question her cognitive ability. We might also wonder if this were, at least in part, an advertising message. BBC has the same benevolent owner as NHS.

It's not uncommon for elderly people to have heart attacks and resume normal lives. This isn't 1950; there has been progress in medecine. I've known two men in their early eighties who had heart attacks and were hiking with their dogs afterwards. I understand that anecdotal evidence proves little, but in these cases it proved a heart attack doesn't mean it's vegetable time.

Should people die when they reach a certain age? Is death preferable to a life below peak health? I don't think so; you'll find no sign on my chest showing a desire to die.

A ‘Duty to Die’? - Thomas Sowell - National Review Online

Nat Hentoff on Euthanasia
That is not what she said. You seem to have just dismissed this part of the article.

Quote:
Quote from the article:

"She added she was determined to have the final say if she falls seriously ill.
'Much better dead'
"If I'm found lying about and can't say something, I want [medics] to accept that," she said.
"I'm 81 and don't need any more use. What do you think I'm going to do with the frightful thought of getting to 100? I hate it.
"My mother-in-law lived to be 106 and in the last six years of her life she'd have been much better dead. She was miserable."
She clearly states what her wishes are. She didn't say saving the NHS money was the REASON she is choosing DNR.... she only mentioned that it would.

I guess this shows why she needs the tattoo.

What I find disturbing.....the comment from the doctor that the tattoo isn't legal. Shame on anyone who would go ahead and resucitate someone who has made their wishes so abundantly clear.

I am not afraid of dying.....I am afraid of ending up in a nursing home wearing a diaper and slobbering all over myself.

I have a Living Will and a Health Care Power of Attorney....and I expect my wishes to be carried out without any second guessing from anyone.....hopefully.

BTW....what does the "P. T. O." and the arrow mean? {Please Turn Over and kiss my a**?}
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Old 09-14-2011, 10:40 AM
 
10,839 posts, read 14,872,141 times
Reputation: 5095
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annie53 View Post

I am not afraid of dying.....I am afraid of ending up in a nursing home wearing a diaper and slobbering all over myself.


-----------------------

My Father had to visit his Mother in a nursing home for almost 3 years. He was out voted 3-1 to put her there.

The 4 sons took turns, going to her house daily to check on her. If she was going to die in her sleep, there was no need for anyone to be there overnight. She was 94. Over a month, each son, only had to make 7 visits.

Then I think she fell, and though she did not break a hip, etc. they decided to move her out.

I visited her as little as I could. I could not stand the smell when you got near the building and how you could "smell" the atmosphere.
Once I asked her if she wanted to live or die. She said LIVE. So, END of SUBJECT. However, if she had said she wanted to die, I might be in jail today for helping her. She told me of stories, that when she needed to use the bathroom she was told NO.

So, my Father said, if any of his children put him in a nursing home, he'd dis-inherit them in his will.

Two of his brothers, who voted to put their Mother there, were in nursing homes. One still is, and the other died at home, last year after requesting to go home to die. He knew he was near the end. He asked for this and got it, about 2 weeks before he died, in his OWN HOME.

I have an Uncle 88 and I know a lady 88. I have suggested, they are in such good health, they may be the type that live to 100 or more. Both said they do not want to live to 100. If we changed the 100 to 99, would they still say no? How low would we have to go, before they would want to live to that age? It sure is not 88, because they are already there.
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Old 09-14-2011, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,745 posts, read 4,222,137 times
Reputation: 6866
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
The subject of the article stated that she did this to save money for the NHS (British government owned National Health Service). Consequently, we might question her cognitive ability. We might also wonder if this were, at least in part, an advertising message. BBC has the same benevolent owner as NHS.

It's not uncommon for elderly people to have heart attacks and resume normal lives. This isn't 1950; there has been progress in medecine. I've known two men in their early eighties who had heart attacks and were hiking with their dogs afterwards. I understand that anecdotal evidence proves little, but in these cases it proved a heart attack doesn't mean it's vegetable time.

Should people die when they reach a certain age? Is death preferable to a life below peak health? I don't think so; you'll find no sign on my chest showing a desire to die.

A ‘Duty to Die’? - Thomas Sowell - National Review Online

Nat Hentoff on Euthanasia
A heart attack is not the same thing as a cardiac arrest. CPR is not performed simply because one has a heart attack. At the age of 59, I am quite willing to undergo treatment for a heart attack. But should I arrest, I do not want CPR, especially if the arrest occurs outside a hospital. God forbid someone "brings me back" when my vital organs have been deprived of oxygen for more than a couple of minutes. Medical science has not yet figured out how to replace the aging brain cells lost due to anoxia. No thanks.
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