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Old 01-25-2017, 01:18 PM
 
Location: Paranoid State
13,047 posts, read 10,641,492 times
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I fired up my snowblower 3 times yesterday: before skiing, after skiing, and before going to bed. 20" of snow yesterday; 51" total in the past week. The skiing has been epic.

 
Old 01-26-2017, 10:25 AM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
2,516 posts, read 1,741,983 times
Reputation: 9036
This morning was Goodies for Grandparents for the second grader today and we went along with the other grands to her school. The other grands are from England and are here for six months every year. Our time here is overlapping more this year and it's been nice to see them so often.

They loved our granddaughter's school, both are retired teachers, and it was interesting to hear their perspective on the school. I find it quite large from the rural/suburban school system I went to and use that as my frame of reference. They see the small classroom sizes, 14 kids to a classroom in a public school, and the overall size is inconsequential to them. They see the teacher/student ratio and believe that is more important. That changed how I see what I thought of as a too large elementary school.

We both watch the grandkids and traded stories. I told of our four-year-old grand son saying "Mamma, you should be more patient!" referring to what I say about other drivers in heavier in-season traffic. Of course he's right and isn't it great to have your own words being used against you? They loved that story.

It was a relief to hear that the grandkids are quite good for them, like they are for us, until the parents arrive to pick them up and then they go wild. I thought it was just us.

It was a good morning and great to connect with the other grands, enjoying our granddaughter showing us around and to see so many other grandparents there for their grandkids.

Last edited by jean_ji; 01-26-2017 at 10:37 AM..
 
Old 01-27-2017, 07:04 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,017 posts, read 17,939,286 times
Reputation: 32336
I love reading up on history. Just found out what George Washington said when he was crossing the Delaware: "Something's wrong here - I paid for a seat!"
 
Old 01-27-2017, 10:51 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
20,328 posts, read 19,311,428 times
Reputation: 34750
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
I love reading up on history. Just found out what George Washington said when he was crossing the Delaware: "Something's wrong here - I paid for a seat!"
@ ER, lol.

jean_ji, it was interesting to read about your experiences. We are supposed to be in England in March with the grand kids and I was wondering how they will behave for us. The oldest, a 10 yr old girl, was kind of bratty last time but I have visions of sitting down with her this time and doing calligraphy with her--the two of us. Would be nice if that could happen. She is now into crafts and I am bringing a calligraphy kit and a book to go with it. I can dream anyway.
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Old 01-28-2017, 05:06 AM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
2,516 posts, read 1,741,983 times
Reputation: 9036
Being into crafts she may love doing that with you. I hope she does, it's great to share what we love.

I knit and in November I asked my granddaughter if she wanted to knit a present for her Mom. To my surprise she was excited about the idea. We decided on a scarf with chunky yarn and big needles. The fun part was watching her progress and keeping at it. She would knit a bit every time she was over after school and could not wait to show her Dad. She taught him how to make a stitch and was getting frustrated with him and realized how difficult it is to teach someone.

On Christmas, her Mom opened her present and reacted perfectly: shock, disbelief, amazement, and making a big deal out of it. I have a feeling my son may have told her how much effort our granddaughter put into it for her. The beaming smile our granddaughter had that morning was great to see. Our DIL wore the scarf all morning even though it was 70 degrees.

I loved that our granddaughter stuck with it. I gave her a tape measure with a wooly sheep head on it and she got into seeing how long it was after each knitting session. I loved I could share this with her and that she wanted to do it. She wants to make something for her Dad next time. Our four year old grandson told me he wants to knit too, but he wants to make a sweater for his Mom. I told him maybe, when he's seven like his sister.

At 10, your granddaughter will have the fine motor skills calligraphy requires. My advice is to toss out the invitation very casually and to see if there's any interest on her part. If not, let it go and don't take it personally. If she is, make it fun for her. As much as you have your heart set on calligraphy, be open to anything she wants to do and don't miss an opportunity.

I tend to be neat and orderly. Letting the grandkids help in the kitchen was really hard until I resigned myself to the idea it would be messy and not how I thought it should be. Both kids can crack a egg now, but it took a lot of eggs to get to this point. Stirring stuff can still slop out of the bowl in amazing ways and a peanut butter sandwich with s few goldfish crackers stuck in isn't half bad.

Keep an open mind and don't miss an opportunity, even if it isn't exactly what you had envisioned..
 
Old 01-28-2017, 07:43 AM
 
6,618 posts, read 5,275,385 times
Reputation: 13732
Oh. I want to learn how to knit.
 
Old 01-28-2017, 09:18 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,017 posts, read 17,939,286 times
Reputation: 32336
Young children are fortunate when they benefit from (a) loving mentor(s) whether it be grandparents, aunts or uncles, scout leaders, teachers or neighbors who go the extra mile, etc. I don't know what is sadder than chldren who are utterly alone - and some are alone even in the midst of others. We can see them on the playground during recess or at lunch, never with another child, just alone. A number of times I have intervened in such siturations.

There is a current thread in the Psychology Forum, something about adulthood being a slow death, in which a poster relates attending summer camp in the fourth grade and never during that time talking with another child because she didn't know how! That's almost enough to make one sit down and cry. I am not claiming that such extreme cases are common, but the fact that they exist is a profound sorrow.

And there are many other less extreme cases where the parents of children are overwhelmed with other responsibilities or just psychologically unsuited to give their children loving support. Various sorts of caring mentors, perhaps grandparents foremost among them, can make a life-long difference.

We teachers will never again see so many of the students that pass through our hands and thus never know how they turn out. This is expressed in a beautiful metaphor by Albert Schweitzer:

"No ray of sunshine is ever lost, but the green which it awakens needs time to sprout, and it is not always granted to the sower to see the harvest. Everything which is worth doing is done on faith."
 
Old 01-28-2017, 09:51 AM
 
Location: Western Colorado
11,202 posts, read 12,681,779 times
Reputation: 26582
A balmy 10 degrees this morning, 11 degrees higher than yesterday mornings low. Crystal clear, beautiful sunrise. Dogs had fun on their morning walk. It might get up to 22 today!
 
Old 01-28-2017, 11:52 AM
 
Location: Idaho
4,727 posts, read 4,619,362 times
Reputation: 9377
Two more, (work), days before I start my pseudo retirement. Starting next Wednesday, I'll stay home from work burning accrued vacation, and a few sick days here and there to take care of some dental work. Over the next two months, I'll have to go in a few days when my expertise will be required to make sure my replacement doesn't goof up.

Otherwise, I'll be at home, mostly spent in downsizing and packing. A little bit of work on the house needs to be done too, but I'll hire most of that out. Then the house will go on the market as soon as it is ready and I'll start hunting for my new home. The dates are all pretty flexible.

For all intents and purposes, I've turned over all my work responsibilities to my replacements at the beginning of January and have only been going in to update the operations how-to documents and answering questions. The difficult part now is sorting e-mail and determining what needs to be passed down. That's a lot of e-mails and it took me about three hours yesterday just going through the e-mail from 2016. And, I'm not quite finished yet with that year. At least I only need to go back to 2008.

Sure feels nice to not have those responsibilities and the stress it creates. But that stress has been replaced by another stress. The stress of downsizing and the unknown of the timing of everything. Also the stress of giving up a well-paying, pretty secure employment. I'll be fine in retirement, but need to decide when to start SS benefits and when to start an annuity and for how much. I can only pray to the good Lord for guidance. And, read the stuff posted here in the Retirement forum. Even though I don't comment on much, I do read a lot of it.
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Old 01-28-2017, 12:11 PM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
2,516 posts, read 1,741,983 times
Reputation: 9036
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Young children are fortunate when they benefit from (a) loving mentor(s) whether it be grandparents, aunts or uncles, scout leaders, teachers or neighbors who go the extra mile, etc. I don't know what is sadder than chldren who are utterly alone - and some are alone even in the midst of others. We can see them on the playground during recess or at lunch, never with another child, just alone. A number of times I have intervened in such siturations.

There is a current thread in the Psychology Forum, something about adulthood being a slow death, in which a poster relates attending summer camp in the fourth grade and never during that time talking with another child because she didn't know how! That's almost enough to make one sit down and cry. I am not claiming that such extreme cases are common, but the fact that they exist is a profound sorrow.

And there are many other less extreme cases where the parents of children are overwhelmed with other responsibilities or just psychologically unsuited to give their children loving support. Various sorts of caring mentors, perhaps grandparents foremost among them, can make a life-long difference.

We teachers will never again see so many of the students that pass through our hands and thus never know how they turn out. This is expressed in a beautiful metaphor by Albert Schweitzer:

"No ray of sunshine is ever lost, but the green which it awakens needs time to sprout, and it is not always granted to the sower to see the harvest. Everything which is worth doing is done on faith."
I was thinking of you as I wrote my post. With your teaching experience, you would have insight into how to judge a kid's interest in things and how best to engage them.
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