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Old 07-17-2013, 06:04 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 19,171,694 times
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'Morning from New England, it's a hot one. I have a question...I was chatting last eve with a friend here who has significant asthma (she's 60-ish). She asked if I knew whether it would be worth it healthwise to relocate to a very different part of the country. Our area, heavily forested in a valley, we found ranks low in terms of air quality (ozone factor) much of the year (though there's no polluting industry to speak of other than printing plants). I said I didn't know but would ask on the board here if any older folk with asthma or other health problems significantly improved their condition by relocation. I assume that any lung-related problems would do better in dry climates, but maybe not higher altitudes. I will pass along to her your comment.

 
Old 07-17-2013, 07:54 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,633,970 times
Reputation: 22439
I can speak for for the Charlotte, NC area . . . where we have (surprisingly) a lot of days w/ mediocre air quality and days when we get alerts. Evidently, there is some air stream that comes down from Canada and brings acid rain as well as pollutants from industrial areas (anyway, that is what I was told years in the past).

We also are a region with many botanicals which makes it a bad area for allergies.

So this is an area I would think should be ruled out, if that helps any at all. :-)
 
Old 07-17-2013, 08:00 AM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,774,833 times
Reputation: 29102
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
'Morning from New England, it's a hot one. I have a question...I was chatting last eve with a friend here who has significant asthma (she's 60-ish). She asked if I knew whether it would be worth it healthwise to relocate to a very different part of the country. Our area, heavily forested in a valley, we found ranks low in terms of air quality (ozone factor) much of the year (though there's no polluting industry to speak of other than printing plants). I said I didn't know but would ask on the board here if any older folk with asthma or other health problems significantly improved their condition by relocation. I assume that any lung-related problems would do better in dry climates, but maybe not higher altitudes. I will pass along to her your comment.
I believe you assume correctly. I have COPD. Consequently, air quality is extremely important to me and ozone levels are a huge part of it. Drier climates are indeed better. However, I'm not a fan of arid conditions and locations. High altitudes can definitely lead to respiratory "challenges" (less oxygen). Both very cold air and very high humidity can cause coughing spasms.

Years ago I was researching places to retire and looked up the cleanest air locations in the country. As of today, here are the ones designated as the Top 10 by the American Lung Assoc.

Cheyenne, WY
Santa Fe, NM
Bismarck, ND
Great Falls, MT
Honolulu, HI
Anchorage, AK
Amarillo, TX
Redding, CA (Who knew?)
Duluth, MN
Fargo, ND

Unfortunately, as with so many best/cheapest/healthiest, etc. listings, none of them are anywhere I'd particularly want to retire. While our current location doesn't make anyone's list but for ours, and while it's not ideal in terms of air quality, it's many times better than Sacramento was and I immediately noticed the difference when we came here house hunting. The air really is very clean and extreme cold and humidity are rarely a negative factor. In fact, today is the first really humid day we've had all summer.

As I've mentioned before, you really shouldn't live anywhere at which you can see the air you breathe.
 
Old 07-17-2013, 10:26 AM
 
Location: SoCal
6,096 posts, read 9,651,342 times
Reputation: 5882
Quote:
Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
... She said that no one respects someone who will just accept "whatever."

All this was in regard to my never stating "what I wanted" for lunch when someone was going to get take out for the group. I always felt that whatever the majority wanted would be fine with me. I just never really gave a rat's arse, to be frank, lol.

But I have often wondered if there is a kernel of truth in what she said. Maybe people DO respect those who are so adamant about every aspect of life and demand that their wishes and expectations be met. Maybe it makes people feel that having to earn a pat on the back for living up to impossibly high standards (or impossibly wacky demands) means they are more worthy.
Maybe it's something in addition to not respecting someone who will just accept "whatever".

A person who will just accept "whatever" is leaving all the decision-making up to me. That's hard work! I want that person to share the burden of making decisions.

I don't find overly demanding people pleasant to be around. But I'm much more comfortable being with people who freely state their preferences and wishes.
 
Old 07-17-2013, 10:41 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,633,970 times
Reputation: 22439
Quote:
Originally Posted by oddstray View Post
Maybe it's something in addition to not respecting someone who will just accept "whatever".

A person who will just accept "whatever" is leaving all the decision-making up to me. That's hard work! I want that person to share the burden of making decisions.

I don't find overly demanding people pleasant to be around. But I'm much more comfortable being with people who freely state their preferences and wishes.
About lunch? You are that burdened about deciding whether you prefer a pizza or an egg sandwich? You would rather 7 people spend 20 minutes jockeying over who really wants the pizza more than the egg sandwich? It is such a terrible moment in your life that you feel you have to be ugly to others who are just trying to row with the flow (one less voice adding to the noise) . . .



I can't remember when, other than a date, I ever needed to state my preferences and wishes to anyone else. When do all these times come up in your life?

If I desire something, I go get it. There is no discussion with anyone about it.

That applies to the egg sandwich or the mercedes benz.

And anyone in my life who is demanding or has a list of expectations won't be in my life long at all, other than a client, lololol. I have to get the big bucks to put up with anyone who thinks they are that precious that I must cater to them.
 
Old 07-17-2013, 04:09 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 19,171,694 times
Reputation: 15656
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
Unfortunately, as with so many best/cheapest/healthiest, etc. listings, none of them are anywhere I'd particularly want to retire. While our current location doesn't make anyone's list but for ours, and while it's not ideal in terms of air quality, it's many times better than Sacramento was and I immediately noticed the difference when we came here house hunting. The air really is very clean and extreme cold and humidity are rarely a negative factor. In fact, today is the first really humid day we've had all summer.

As I've mentioned before, you really shouldn't live anywhere at which you can see the air you breathe.
I myself never had an allergy living in Missouri (twice). But upon coming back here have acquired some challenges that I believe are tied to poor air quality. My friend mentioned has only lived here, and her asthma is adult-onset. She doesn't want to go into older age struggling like she is. She's wondering if a move could really help, though of course there's no way to really know until she does it. What is COPD? A form of asthma?
 
Old 07-17-2013, 04:24 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
20,328 posts, read 19,311,428 times
Reputation: 34750
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
I myself never had an allergy living in Missouri (twice). But upon coming back here have acquired some challenges that I believe are tied to poor air quality. My friend mentioned has only lived here, and her asthma is adult-onset. She doesn't want to go into older age struggling like she is. She's wondering if a move could really help, though of course there's no way to really know until she does it. What is COPD? A form of asthma?
When I used to live in your area, the air quality bothered me a lot in the summer. The ozone warnings in the summer--on those days I would be sick from just going out of the house and I remember my Ex actually throwing up when he went outside from the air. It was hot and humid and polluted.

The nasty air quality was not the fault of our area; it came from the NYC area and was funneled up the valley where it was dumped upon us. My dad used to say our area was like a bowl that all the pollution would accumulate in. Add to the smelly air (and it did smell) the woods and fields of our beautiful valley and you get some of the nastiest weeds and mold imaginable.

I feel better having moved, even though it's just within the same state. Back "home" looks nice in a picture but doesn't always feel good when you're there.
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Old 07-17-2013, 04:35 PM
 
Location: Edina, MN, USA
6,977 posts, read 7,473,925 times
Reputation: 16359
When I moved from a smaller town to the metro, my skin always felt dirty - and it was dirty. I'd wash my face the minute I got home from work and it was filthy - all those stinky buses. Now, not traveling into downtown, this is not the case. It doesn't look dirty downtown, but obviously the air is bad.
 
Old 07-17-2013, 04:43 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 19,171,694 times
Reputation: 15656
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
When I used to live in your area, the air quality bothered me a lot in the summer. The ozone warnings in the summer--on those days I would be sick from just going out of the house and I remember my Ex actually throwing up when he went outside from the air. It was hot and humid and polluted.

The nasty air quality was not the fault of our area; it came from the NYC area and was funneled up the valley where it was dumped upon us. My dad used to say our area was like a bowl that all the pollution would accumulate in. Add to the smelly air (and it did smell) the woods and fields of our beautiful valley and you get some of the nastiest weeds and mold imaginable.

I feel better having moved, even though it's just within the same state. Back "home" looks nice in a picture but doesn't always feel good when you're there.
I hear you, on heavy humid days it does get bad, but it never smells poorly here nor is there any smog like in LA, etc. It's usually pretty clear and many days in spring, fall and winter give us cool and crisp, clean air. When it gets bad is during these super hot humid stretches that can last a week or more. I don't know whether it's pollen or mold that's higher in New England, but either one is bad for those with allergies. Add to it all the rain we have had since April, compounding the problem.
 
Old 07-17-2013, 04:44 PM
 
30,037 posts, read 35,229,823 times
Reputation: 11966
Quote:
Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
About lunch? You are that burdened about deciding whether you prefer a pizza or an egg sandwich? You would rather 7 people spend 20 minutes jockeying over who really wants the pizza more than the egg sandwich? It is such a terrible moment in your life that you feel you have to be ugly to others who are just trying to row with the flow (one less voice adding to the noise) . . .



I can't remember when, other than a date, I ever needed to state my preferences and wishes to anyone else. When do all these times come up in your life?

If I desire something, I go get it. There is no discussion with anyone about it.

That applies to the egg sandwich or the mercedes benz.

And anyone in my life who is demanding or has a list of expectations won't be in my life long at all, other than a client, lololol. I have to get the big bucks to put up with anyone who thinks they are that precious that I must cater to them.
When we go out for meals especially Chinese with multiple folks and are sharing I often give up my choices as I like it all and might find a new dish I haven't tried before
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