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Old 06-09-2012, 06:01 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 19,158,772 times
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Baby boomers had better embrace change


I almost created a new thread on this but thought the better of it as most likely it would be moved to politics and controversies where many of do not wish to go.

But there's some interesting food for thought for boomers, and I hope we can comment on it here.

Baby boomers had better embrace change - The Washington Post
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Old 06-10-2012, 09:35 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,603,015 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Baby boomers had better embrace change


I almost created a new thread on this but thought the better of it as most likely it would be moved to politics and controversies where many of do not wish to go.

But there's some interesting food for thought for boomers, and I hope we can comment on it here.

Baby boomers had better embrace change - The Washington Post
I read the article, NEGirl, but find it a non-issue. The Boomers I personally know are fascinated with other cultures, have friends from different cultures, and have embraced the food and often, celebrations, from other countries.

This would include on a physical level - seeking out yoga instructors, tai chi, aryuvedic medicine, acupunture, etc . . . and looking to folks from other cultures as the experts in those fields.

Interest in food and creating thai dishes, japanese recipes, mediterranean diet, Indian cuisine . . . shopping at hispanic markets and asian markets . . . taking cooking classes . . . recognizing that diabetes is lower in other cultures and incorporating those eating styles . . .

So I am not sure what the author is really trying to get to with the concern about diversity. Boomers have, as a group, typically been very curious about other cultures and enjoyed incorporating their traditions, food, clothing styles, etc - and we have been the first generation to really be able to travel extensively and experience other cultures firsthand. Immigration doesn't concern anyone I know. Illegal immigration IS a concern, but only in relation to tax dollars and entitlements. Even if someone is here illegally - and they are working and contributing - the Boomers I know would like to see them on a pathway to citizenship. Good citizens come in all shapes, colors and with various cultural backgrounds -- and bring new and interesting traditions with them to this country.
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Old 06-10-2012, 09:59 AM
 
Location: land of ahhhs
278 posts, read 301,523 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Baby boomers had better embrace change


I almost created a new thread on this but thought the better of it as most likely it would be moved to politics and controversies where many of do not wish to go.

But there's some interesting food for thought for boomers, and I hope we can comment on it here.

Baby boomers had better embrace change - The Washington Post
OK, I'll bite
It's still the Washington Post, and while maybe not as blatantly liberal as in the past, still.....after all, it is Washington. I guess that's why government is seen as the answer to everything. Quote from article:

"Because of their numbers and clout, the voices of baby boomers will be heard. Letís hope they, in turn, hear the message that their future, as well as the nationís, is tied to the well-being of todayís diverse, striving younger Americans."

This to promote special treatment of narrowly defined groups? I'm all for great education for all, equal opportunity, etc. I was born in '46--I understand racism. A while back I was getting a manicure and sitting next to a black woman (I'm white). These nail parlors seem to all be run by and employ small Asian women. As we were sitting waiting for polish to dry under those weird lights they use, watching the activity in the salon, she turned to me and said, "they sure are different from us aren't they?" We both got a chuckle out of that when the realization struck. The point is, I think this will take care of itself with what's already in place. No, society is not perfect; after all, women are still, for the most part, underpaid. And I think it's generational differences rather than race or immigration status that cause the conflict. Our kids should have had more kids if they worry about the financial burden of the boomers (not that I'll ever get to retire). My two each have one, and they're done. For more on generational differences and solutions, check out Tamara Erickson. But, I ramble--huge subject, many implications, and unedited post
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Old 06-11-2012, 06:21 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 19,158,772 times
Reputation: 15656
Final P of that article:

"Because of their numbers and clout, the voices of baby boomers will be heard. Letís hope they, in turn, hear the message that their future, as well as the nationís, is tied to the well-being of todayís diverse, striving younger Americans."

There are many majority boomers who do understand and embrace change demographically, and as Anifani points out, are curious and educated about other cultures. And yet, outside of my particular lifestyle arena, I continually hear from my sisters and others in the boomer group that this diversity is not welcome (put in not so nice words).

Besides the political aspect, I'm trying to get the overall larger point of the article, and for some reason it's eluding me. I don't feel out of touch with the changing population; it's heavily affected the city closest to me. I see a new vitality from diversity.

What bothers me is that the article seems to imply that boomers are living in a bubble and are somehow ignorant or fearful of change, and while that's true for many, it's just as not true for many.
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Old 06-11-2012, 09:58 AM
 
Location: land of ahhhs
278 posts, read 301,523 times
Reputation: 489
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Final P of that article:


Besides the political aspect, I'm trying to get the overall larger point of the article, and for some reason it's eluding me..
I think that is the take home--there is no "point". This seems like filler to me, or maybe something to provoke thought (and posts on C-D).
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Old 06-11-2012, 01:34 PM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,603,015 times
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NEGirl - that is how the article made me feel, too! I was scratching my head trying to figure out where all these out of town Boomers are. Then I did remember a casual friend who continually complains about "illegals." (but she is in the WWII generation - not actually a Boomer). Then I also realized a close friend has this as one of her topics (but again, she is NOT a Boomer -she 5 years shy of being a Boomer).

My mother stays in a snit about "illegals," too . . . but she is 82.

Maybe it is just that my friends tend to be moderate to liberal on social issues, in general. But I don't think that is necessarily it . . . I have listened to people's opinions evolve of the last five or so years - and many who were concerned about undocumented non-citizens now feel that folks should be given a path to citizenship if they have been here and been productive. So . . . I don't know what the author's "call to action" is really based on. ????

Oh - and I also agree - the article DID imply Boomers are out of touch and in a bubble. It think that is just plain weird and my hubby is the first year of Boomers and he and his contemporaries have been quick to embrace the internet and all the technology that goes along with it . . . and are pretty savvy with research, as well. SO i am a bit perplexed what the author was really intending.
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Old 06-11-2012, 03:21 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 19,158,772 times
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Thanks all, so it seems we don't get the point of the article....

On another note, I just picked up the latest Pen / O.Henry "Best Stories of the Year 2012" and am enjoying reading these late at night/early morning. I highly recommend short story anthologies to those like me who find it tedious to get through a long novel. Alice Munro and Wendell Berry are among the writers included. These short stories are rather long, not the short-shorts. Another one is "Best American Short Stories 2012" seen on display at local bookstores and BN.
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Old 06-11-2012, 07:02 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,756 posts, read 4,270,439 times
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I thought the point of the article was this: Boomers need to recognize and accept that the well being of our country and the Boomers' financial well being depends on the success of the younger generations. The predominant group among the younger generations will be Hispanics. Hispanics and several other minority groups are among the least educated groups in the U.S. Less education = low earnings = reduced tax revenue = less funds for Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, Senior assistance, etc.

Boomers (and Generation Xers) need to get their head out of their butts and realize it is in their best economic interests to ensure that Hispanics and others are afforded an adequate education, etc.

That said, its too bad that the article failed to mention that the Millennial Generation should exceed the size of the Boomer generation in a few years. It is one huge generation and some of those "kids" are just beginning to realize their potential political strength. They are also the ones who currently have the largest unemployment rate.
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Old 06-12-2012, 06:49 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 19,158,772 times
Reputation: 15656
Quote:
Originally Posted by lenora View Post
That said, its too bad that the article failed to mention that the Millennial Generation should exceed the size of the Boomer generation in a few years. It is one huge generation and some of those "kids" are just beginning to realize their potential political strength. They are also the ones who currently have the largest unemployment rate.
Every time I pass the local schools and see hundreds of kids going in and out and playing on the playgrounds, and think about how many scenes like this there are in every town and city across the entire U.S., I have to wonder what their future is in terms of jobs and advancement. As for political strength, I wonder how many will actually be engaged in voting and activism, and even knowing how to use that strength. But for some reason, maybe because I could be a grandmother some day, I'm thinking about the next generations and what's in store for them, will they be much better off than the boomers, or much worse. Where will the jobs be.
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Old 06-12-2012, 07:05 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,603,015 times
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Lenora - nice insight on the article. That makes sense to me.

Here is my take on my son's generation . . . born in 1983, referred to as Gen Y or Millenials (I birthed later than most my contemporaries, lol). I spend more time with this group than any other age group. Why? They are our hope. So I have mentored several of them and helped them start businesses, while still in college. They all are running their own businesses now and the one thing I required of them was to mentor others so they, too, could create their own work.

I find this generation fresh, accepting, ecumenical in their beliefs, open to possibilities. They understand conventions but tend to think unconventionally. They grew up playing video games with other kids around the world so they have no barriers with understanding other cultures. Many speak at least a bit of several other foreign languages, with Japanese being very popular. They form short term alliances as needed. They know how to work together to reach a goal, but respect each other's independent thought and creativity. They are not bound by space or place. They will confer with other team members from across the country or in another country, via Skype. They will stay tirelessly on task as needed, but know how to take a break and renew their spirits. They seek a true mind, body, spirit connection. They don't see the world as confining . . . they see it as expanding.

I teach them corporate structure, how to create contracts, how to cold call, the elements of strategic planning, demographic research, etc. They share with me the latest tech info and gadgets and apps - and SEO. I show them what elements go into good website copy; they teach me the coding to create a website, lol. I teach them how to gauge trending; they point out the latest net memes. Collaborating with them is exciting, uplifting and very productive.

They ARE our hope. I think they are the world's hope.

Last edited by brokensky; 06-12-2012 at 07:15 AM..
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