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Old 11-05-2013, 05:42 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,017 posts, read 17,939,286 times
Reputation: 32336

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Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
It has a lot to do with everything when there is ice and snow on the road. That's not happening quite yet, but any time now. Probably not a problem where you live.
Good point. Indeed, it's not a problem where I live, so it didn't occur to me to relate to darkness as equaling additional difficulty in driving on ice and snow.

 
Old 11-06-2013, 07:55 AM
 
Location: Western Colorado
11,202 posts, read 12,681,779 times
Reputation: 26582
It's 7 degrees this morning with snow on the ground. SOOOOO happy to be retired! Watching the worker bees scurrying about. Think I'll get another cup of coffee.
 
Old 11-06-2013, 08:47 AM
 
Location: Verde Valley AZ
8,766 posts, read 9,841,864 times
Reputation: 11350
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Good point. Indeed, it's not a problem where I live, so it didn't occur to me to relate to darkness as equaling additional difficulty in driving on ice and snow.
When I lived in the mountains of No. Idaho I had to deal with this every winter. If I wanted to spend the day in town...which I didn't do very often!...I had to leave home in the dark and got home in the dark. Because it got dark around 4 PM. At one point I worked at a place in town from 2-10 PM and driving home at night could be a real 'adventure' on icy roads. AND you had to watch out for the Elk and Moose that loved to hang out along the hiway!

Back home, here in AZ, it gets dark by 6 PM right now. In summer it stays light till a little after 8 PM. I guess, if we went on DST, it would stay light till 9 PM? Living in Alaska was the real adventure though. It was full daylight 24/7 in summer and nearly complete dark 24/7 in winter. Both took some getting used to.

I guess I'm just glad I don't have to worry about changing the clocks twice a year!
 
Old 11-06-2013, 09:15 AM
 
Location: Virginia
18,717 posts, read 27,131,671 times
Reputation: 42872
I dunno, maybe this is more of a problem in Massachusetts. Another reason to move south for retirement? Maybe...

All I know is last night I went to a planning meeting for the associates group at the fire department in my new town. I was probably the youngest person there. We talked about the various events going on for the winter, both things that we sponsor to raise money (chili cook off, new year's party, a senior's "prom" that includes auctioning off dates with firemen) and community events that we need to attend because a large fire is involved (winterfest marshmallow roast, parties with bonfires, Christmas fireworks show, etc.)

We also raise a lot of money taking photos with Santa and having Santa visit the neighborhoods on the fire truck--and most of those things are done at night to accommodate the parents (since they have to work).

Getting to the point, a large percentage of these events are after dark. So, thinking about this thread, I asked if we should hold some of these events during the day to accommodate all the people who can't go to events after dark. Especially those who might be adversely affected by daylight savings time.

They looked at me like I was nuts.

Apparently this is not an issue for anyone down my way.

And it's true... I noticed on my way home that lots of senior citizens are out driving after dark--it's not a big deal here. Of course, one reason may be that icy roads aren't that common. And, if a bad winter storm does come our way, they have alternate days the bigger events can be held.

I would hate to have a retirement in a place where half the year I felt I could only go out during daylight. I guess you deal with it by watching a lot of movies and having lots of things to do in your house--but personally, that would get me depressed. I like being out and active in my community
 
Old 11-06-2013, 09:37 AM
 
Location: SoCal
6,096 posts, read 9,651,342 times
Reputation: 5882
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caladium View Post
I dunno, maybe this is more of a problem in Massachusetts. Another reason to move south for retirement? Maybe...
I wonder if that's it. The farther north you go, the more extreme the difference in hours of daylight vs. darkness in a day. Maybe that makes the change seem more annoying.

Quote:
All I know is last night I went to a planning meeting for the associates group at the fire department in my new town. I was probably the youngest person there. We talked about the various events going on for the winter, both things that we sponsor to raise money (chili cook off, new year's party, a senior's "prom" that includes auctioning off dates with firemen) and community events that we need to attend because a large fire is involved (winterfest marshmallow roast, parties with bonfires, Christmas fireworks show, etc.)

We also raise a lot of money taking photos with Santa and having Santa visit the neighborhoods on the fire truck--and most of those things are done at night to accommodate the parents (since they have to work).

Getting to the point, a large percentage of these events are after dark. So, thinking about this thread, I asked if we should hold some of these events during the day to accommodate all the people who can't go to events after dark. Especially those who might be adversely affected by daylight savings time.

They looked at me like I was nuts.
Most likely because most of the stuff you mentioned is inherently dark-skies activities. Who wants a bonfire or fireworks in the daylight?

Quote:
Apparently this is not an issue for anyone down my way.
Or you self-select by socializing with people for whom it's not an issue.

Quote:
And it's true... I noticed on my way home that lots of senior citizens are out driving after dark--it's not a big deal here. Of course, one reason may be that icy roads aren't that common. And, if a bad winter storm does come our way, they have alternate days the bigger events can be held.

I would hate to have a retirement in a place where half the year I felt I could only go out during daylight. I guess you deal with it by watching a lot of movies and having lots of things to do in your house--but personally, that would get me depressed. I like being out and active in my community
I'm soooooo glad I don't live any more where winter means lots of snow and icy roads!
 
Old 11-06-2013, 10:45 AM
 
Location: Edina, MN, USA
6,977 posts, read 7,473,925 times
Reputation: 16359
I drive - light, dark, snow, dry. Most of the time icy roads are taken care of right away - I know they are the worst. When long distance driving I like driving at night - less traffic, if there's construction they are usually done for the day. My neighbor tried to tell me "No, no you can't drive at night!!" - What?! Of course I can and do. It's like the goblins come out - and I guess in some respects they do. I do a lot of my grocery shopping at midnight and sometimes later so I don't have to take my daytime hours to do it. Nice.

But, although I usually don't pay attention to the time change except to change a couple clocks, I have started waking up around 5 a.m the last few days which is much earlier than the 1 hour time difference. I feel totally rested and ready to go. My dogs are ready to go at that hour too (maybe their stirring is what wakes me - ).
 
Old 11-06-2013, 11:17 AM
 
Location: UpstateNY
8,612 posts, read 8,427,479 times
Reputation: 7530
yep, you guys nailed it. We huddle in the cottage until spring. A few years ago it was a challenge that we were up to, now it's to the point we dread it.

Yes, we get our chores done and keep the animals well, but only go out when necessary.

I'll bet we have over 300 DVD's.

So ready to move south. sigh......
 
Old 11-06-2013, 01:12 PM
 
Location: Virginia
18,717 posts, read 27,131,671 times
Reputation: 42872
Quote:
Originally Posted by Umbria View Post
I drive - light, dark, snow, dry. Most of the time icy roads are taken care of right away - I know they are the worst. When long distance driving I like driving at night - less traffic, if there's construction they are usually done for the day. My neighbor tried to tell me "No, no you can't drive at night!!" - What?! Of course I can and do. It's like the goblins come out - and I guess in some respects they do. I do a lot of my grocery shopping at midnight and sometimes later so I don't have to take my daytime hours to do it. Nice.

But, although I usually don't pay attention to the time change except to change a couple clocks, I have started waking up around 5 a.m the last few days which is much earlier than the 1 hour time difference. I feel totally rested and ready to go. My dogs are ready to go at that hour too (maybe their stirring is what wakes me - ).
Ahhh... a woman after my own heart! I used to do the midnight grocery shopping, too. Now I live in an area that doesn't have stores open that late, but I still tend to hit them after 9, when I'm headed home from whatever it is I did that evening.

I'm sleeping a little later these days, mostly due to the temperature change. In the summer I got up before 5 to do my daily circuit. Now it's a little too chilly at 5 a.m. to be out doing a few miles--I cuddle under the covers and wait until the sun comes out.

But, sometimes I wake up at 4 or 5 anyway. If I'm up, that's a good time to get things done, too. <cat breaks in to point out that the most important chore to be done at 5 a.m. is feeding him! That's why he woke me up!>

I've never had a problem driving at night, except during rutting season. Actually, for longer trips I think driving late at night or in the wee hours of the morning is safer. And a lot more pleasant.
 
Old 11-06-2013, 01:51 PM
 
Location: Edina, MN, USA
6,977 posts, read 7,473,925 times
Reputation: 16359
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caladium View Post

I've never had a problem driving at night, except during rutting season. Actually, for longer trips I think driving late at night or in the wee hours of the morning is safer. And a lot more pleasant.
Yes. I've had people say things like stay off the road after dark - all the truckers are drugged up to stay awake. If they're drugged up at night they're probably drugged up during the day too. Look at all the empty space at night - there's no reason to be driving next to anyone. Much safer. The only downside is if you have car trouble - ewwww - scary.

Driving back from FL I drove all night - coming into Mpls there was fresh dusting of snow, the roads were almost empty (around 4:30 a.m.) and the street lamps had a glistening glow to them (maybe I was tired) and it was really serene. I felt like I had the city to myself. When the garage door went up~~~~there's nothing better than home.
 
Old 11-06-2013, 03:39 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 19,171,694 times
Reputation: 15656
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caladium View Post

Getting to the point, a large percentage of these events are after dark. So, thinking about this thread, I asked if we should hold some of these events during the day to accommodate all the people who can't go to events after dark. Especially those who might be adversely affected by daylight savings time.

They looked at me like I was nuts.
In the northern part of the U.S., there is little to no correlation between going back to standard time in the fall and doing things after dark. Going back to standard time only means that it starts to get dark at around 5 p.m. instead of 6 p.m. There are few to no events or meetings held at those times. More like 7 or 8 p.m. So either way, DST or standard time, you're in the dark after a certain early hour in winter.
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