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Old 11-20-2013, 08:14 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 19,171,694 times
Reputation: 15656

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Quote:
Originally Posted by CCc girl View Post
But, of course, do I have an extinguisher? No. Not even in the house or the barn. DOH!
In upstate NY and you're not disaster-prepared?? Shame!

Get those extinguishers! And the stuff for your car.

 
Old 11-20-2013, 11:13 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
20,328 posts, read 19,311,428 times
Reputation: 34750
Well, it seems that those of us who have emergency stocked cars may not be nuts after all. One thing I never did use was the extra set of gloves that I always kept in the glove compartment. Seems that if it's cold enough for gloves, I'd be wearing them anyway.

I have a car cell phone charger. Have the blanket. Don't know what I did with all those beacons and flairs and triangles that you are supposed to set up -- dh laughed me out of house and home over those.

My car is a station wagon so I could stock it up again (little by little so the other person doesn't notice) and feel safer this winter. I wonder what he did with my plastic box that I had everything stashed in!
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Old 11-21-2013, 03:21 AM
Status: "Support the Mining Law of 1872" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,668 posts, read 11,127,014 times
Reputation: 19463
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caladium View Post

Where I live we have fairly mild winters, and the reality of my life is I don't have any reasons to be driving in wilderness areas during a heavy winter storm. And if I did, I would already be wearing boots and a heavy winter coat--no need to have extra in the car.
The woman I mentioned who was trapped in her car wasn't in a wilderness area. I believe that she was on a main road but when she went off she went down an embankment next to the road and just wasn't visible.

Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Several friends have called me really nuts because of my emergency gear, which I learned to pack when I worked for the American Red Cross. I am a natural at putting together survival gear.
I've taken the Red Cross Basic and Advanced First Aid courses as well as CPR. Everybody should take them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Somehow I've misplaced my mini-axe that I was sure was in my Corolla trunk. I must find that, it's a great tool to have along with rope and tarps, etc. Now you're all probably convinced I'm a serial killer, or certifiably insane, lol. Laugh all you want, I will be the one prepared for anything.
These are a little pricy but the quality is outstanding. They'll do everything a hatchet will do. The only problem is that any 13 yo boy in your family will want one for Christmas.

Amazon.com: Ka-Bar Becker BK3 Tac Tool Fixed Blade Knife: Sports & Outdoors

Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Never thought of the beacons. Where do you get them and how much cost?
The first two are the ones that I bought. The third one looks better than the second but I didn't see it before. I wanted to have one that the vehicle battery powered and one with its own batteries.

Wolo Model 3200-A Emergency 1 Magnetic Mount Teardrop Style Rotating Warning Light - Amber : Amazon.com : Automotive

Amazon.com: Leland Marine Emergency Strobe Light: Sports & Outdoors

Fortune PL-300AJ Battery Powered Ultra Bright LED Standard Police Beacon, 5" Diameter x 5" Height, Amber: Amazon.com: Industrial & Scientific

Why don't you visit us on the S-S and P subforum more often? You have a lot of information to offer. I started a survival thread for us decrepit folks here but it got the boot to S-S and P.

Last edited by Happy in Wyoming; 11-21-2013 at 03:43 AM..
 
Old 11-21-2013, 05:56 AM
 
Location: Virginia
18,717 posts, read 27,131,671 times
Reputation: 42872
To each his own, I guess. To me it sounds like yet another reason to retire in a city/suburban area--and in a state with a milder climate. I hear what Happy in Wyoming is saying, and I get it--if I lived out in the middle of Wyoming I could see the need for all that survival gear, too. Where I live in suburbia, things are different. The only time people in my neighborhood would put all that stuff in a car would be if they were headed out on a camping trip.

Seriously, if you're thinking about retirement and considering where you might want to live, think twice about the advantages of living in a more densely populated area. Cities have a lot of benefits for retirees, including a lot of little things like being likely to have cell phone coverage no matter where you drive. You really don't have to worry about driving over embankments and not being seen for days. I can't think of any places where I live where no one would see a wrecked car for days. Even if there was such an embankment, if I went over it I'd call 911 and they would use the GPS to find my car.

Having said that, I do agree that even if you live in cities or suburbs, some emergency items are handy. While you're waiting for help, a lightweight blanket is nice if it happens to be a chilly night (but if you retire to an area with a mild climate there will be fairly few nights where it gets all that cold). The shoes are handy if you need to walk to get help--but the one time I did that I later realized I would have been better off just staying in the car. I could see having a basic first aid kit, some flares, some cash, and some small tools (screw driver, pocket knife, things like that). Everything should be able to fit into a small box.

Someone mentioned keeping a gun in the car. I don't live in a neighborhood where having a gun in your car is necessary--but if you think it's something you should have in your car, I suppose you'd need to put it in a place that's handy. It won't help to keep it in some box under the back seat.

But that's just me--I like to travel light. I need my space for all that stuff I buy at Costco. if other people like having lots of camping gear things in their car, it's cool. Who knows--you might yet get the last laugh some day.

Last edited by Caladium; 11-21-2013 at 06:18 AM..
 
Old 11-21-2013, 06:36 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 19,171,694 times
Reputation: 15656
It's not about where you live, but what can happen anywhere in any climate. When a rare tornado ripped through the closest city to me a few years ago, it flattened many neighborhoods. So many people were forced to go to shelters, hotels, and with family. They had to go there without their documents, meds, and everyday items. Not only weather events, but chemical spills, flooding and other emergencies can make being prepared a good idea.

When I worked for the Red Cross I produced a draft of a community disaster plan for the county, which included what local businesses would do to help out. There are now certificate and degree programs in disaster planning. Sadly, few communities have comprehensive plans and individuals most likely don't have the basic booklet that a few communities put in print.

Many emergency plans suggest that we have, for each family member, basic medical info, lists of prescriptions, copies of health insurance and home insurance, list of family contacts with phones, three days of basic daily necessities, eyeglasses, etc. either in the car or by the front door. In a tornado, by the front door doesn't work so well.

In an emergency it is possible that we will be separated from these things, including our handbags, wallets, or prepared packets. Deciding on how and where to have these items on hand is the hard part. It's like creating an estate plan. Once done, it's done. With luck we'll never need our preparation ~
 
Old 11-21-2013, 07:03 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,633,970 times
Reputation: 22439
I have needed my emergency supplies which I keep in my house on several occasions, both in Kansas and in NC. I have a small generator that I have used in NC and never had a need for in Kansas (which is surprising - as I am referring to a suburb inside the city limits of Charlotte).

At the mountain house, I can't even begin to relay all the instances when I have needed some sort of emergency assistance. Our electricity was off yesterday for several hours, lol. A transformer "blew" - why? I have no idea. The weather was quite lovely!

We have a "grab it" waterproof box that has all our important info in it (copies). That, coupled with our "emergency tub" (which has everything from lanterns to sterno and all sorts of things in between, including a flashlight that runs by winding a handle) have been used many times over the years. We constantly update our stash in that tub. Last year, I added a small battery operated generator so that we can charge our cell phones/computers - and power a coffee machine or hot plate).

Even though our primary home is in an upscale area inside the city limits - and we have underground utilities - we have had more outages of long duration in Charlotte than we ever experienced in Kansas and the mountains! Crazy!

We had a rare tornado touch down at our mountain house! Thousands of dollars of damage. No one has recorded a tornado EVER touching down on that side of the mountain, yet it happened!

We have all sorts of GPS tracking apps and iphones and ipads that send out GPS signals, but here in the mountains, there are so many "dead spots" . . . a car could slide off the main road to our house and b/c of dense foliage and deep drop offs, it is possible no one would find us for days - maybe weeks - unless someone was looking (which is one reason we stay in close touch with our son, who is able to track our daily movements via Find Friends app).

I guess all of this "emergency stuff" is just a way of life for me. As a native North Carolinian, I grew up with hurricanes affecting even western NC . . . bathtubs full of water (to use to flush toilets) were a way of life. I was much more casual about emergency prep til I went through Hurricane Hugo and a direct hit that wasn't supposed to occur. Being without electricity for 8 days was hell . . . not to mention the debris and clean up and damage repair.

For me, it is just smart to be safe, rather than sorry. Tornadoes, Nor'easters, Hurricanes, tropical storms . . . they can all wreak havoc. I would never have dreamed that my Kansas house, which was on the highest hill in my subdivision, would have flooded in the midwestern floods of '93, but yes, it flooded in my basement - nearly a foot. And this was a fully finished basement with kitchen, and a storage room, where all my work was stored - in bankers boxes. Lost everything - a lifetime of clippings of bylined newspaper and magazine articles, amongst the flotsum. That is when I quit storing anything in cardboard boxes; everything is in plastic tubs.

Live and learn.

The only thing I have never used in my car emergency kit is the swiss gadget that breaks out windows and cuts seatbelts and I pray I never have to use it. But after living this long and experiencing emergencies and accidents I could never have fathomed would have possibly occurred . . . I am prepared, lol.

The only thing I haven't done at the mountain house that would put me in a better position for an emergency is install a wood stove (there used to be one in this house). I had hoped to have that done by summer, but the renovation on the house did not progress to the point where I was able to claim the space for installation. I am keeping my fingers crossed that we won't regret not pushing harder to get one installed for this winter.
 
Old 11-21-2013, 07:16 AM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
2,516 posts, read 1,741,983 times
Reputation: 9036
Quote:
If we expect the unexpected, then it won't be unexpected and hence would ruin the surprise. ~anonymous
I'm not the surprise type.

Living in FL now, we have a go box (fire and water proof) with all our necessary papers/documents. There is so much public awareness here on preparedness for hurricanes. The box is also perfect for snowbirds, we take it between both places.

We've always been prepared, we had many power outages in our NY village for years until the power company beefed up the lines, so we always were stocked up with flashlights, etc. With Irene, the freak October snow storm and Sandy, we already had a generator, so we were okay and could help the neighbors with charging cell phones and powering their sump pumps.

Growing up in tornado alley we've never been complacent about emergency situations. Our first home together was on a river. There was a hundred year flood that enveloped our detached garage, with water in our basement. We were in our early twenties, but helped two widows on each side. We were low on TP and I have been overstocked on that ever since.

Along with the flood, we weathered out the blizzard of '78 there and had learned to be self sufficient as much as anyone can.The real lesson we learned then was that the authorities were not to be relied upon. Sandbag locations were inaccurate and the river was cresting way before they were predicting back then during the flood and no one can assist you when over three foot of snow comes in a short time. You are on your own after disasters and it's best to rely on yourself until things get sorted out.

As far as cars go, we've got mountains and ravines in NY, many retention ponds and swamp areas in FL. We routinely drive between FL, NY and IN, so we have the basics in the car too. Surprises can happen anywhere.

Last edited by jean_ji; 11-21-2013 at 07:38 AM..
 
Old 11-21-2013, 07:23 AM
 
Location: UpstateNY
8,612 posts, read 8,427,479 times
Reputation: 7530
Well said, all.

Lucky for us our power always seems to go out in the summers. Go figure??

Love the tub idea, Ani.

Will get on those extinguishers ASAP.
 
Old 11-21-2013, 07:25 AM
 
Location: UpstateNY
8,612 posts, read 8,427,479 times
Reputation: 7530
OMG jean_ji what are your NY and FL towns? (We're in NY and soon moving to FL)
 
Old 11-21-2013, 12:32 PM
Status: "Support the Mining Law of 1872" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,668 posts, read 11,127,014 times
Reputation: 19463
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caladium View Post
To each his own, I guess. To me it sounds like yet another reason to retire in a city/suburban area--and in a state with a milder climate. I hear what Happy in Wyoming is saying, and I get it--if I lived out in the middle of Wyoming I could see the need for all that survival gear, too. Where I live in suburbia, things are different. The only time people in my neighborhood would put all that stuff in a car would be if they were headed out on a camping trip.

My dream from my earliest childhood was to live in the rural mountain West. Now I've fulfilled that dream. I was just looking out the window at some strange rock formations that lie along the north side of the canyon where I live. The formations which extend for several miles are known as the Playground of the Gods. I see them every single day but each time is just as thrilling as the time before. I have a local park about thirty miles west; it's called Yellowstone National Park. Every year two million people come from all over the world for the vacation of a lifetime; but I live here.

Mild winters usually mean hot summers. I can always get warm on a cold day but I can't be cool outside on a hot day. I like four seasons.

I suppose it is less safe to live away from town and emergency services. But it's worth it. I never hear screaming children or traffic noise. The loudest sounds I normally hear here are families of coyotes making their rounds. The only unpleasant exception is an occasional motorcycle on the highway a mile away in the summer. I have enough land that I'm insulated from intrusion; my nearest neighbors are a 1/2 mile away.

The longer I live in Wyoming the more I realize it's not just a place; it's a way of life, a good one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Caladium View Post
Seriously, if you're thinking about retirement and considering where you might want to live, think twice about the advantages of living in a more densely populated area. Cities have a lot of benefits for retirees, including a lot of little things like being likely to have cell phone coverage no matter where you drive. You really don't have to worry about driving over embankments and not being seen for days. I can't think of any places where I live where no one would see a wrecked car for days. Even if there was such an embankment, if I went over it I'd call 911 and they would use the GPS to find my car.

I remember seeing a car turned over in a ditch about 25' deep within the city of Chicago. There was a construction project of some sort.

I know that cell phone service is continally improving but I wouldn't care to take the chance that there are no more urban deadspots.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Caladium View Post
Having said that, I do agree that even if you live in cities or suburbs, some emergency items are handy. While you're waiting for help, a lightweight blanket is nice if it happens to be a chilly night (but if you retire to an area with a mild climate there will be fairly few nights where it gets all that cold). The shoes are handy if you need to walk to get help--but the one time I did that I later realized I would have been better off just staying in the car. I could see having a basic first aid kit, some flares, some cash, and some small tools (screw driver, pocket knife, things like that). Everything should be able to fit into a small box.
Many hypothermia deaths occur at temperatures above 50. People need to be at 98.6.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Caladium View Post
Someone mentioned keeping a gun in the car. I don't live in a neighborhood where having a gun in your car is necessary--but if you think it's something you should have in your car, I suppose you'd need to put it in a place that's handy. It won't help to keep it in some box under the back seat.
Criminals have cars; trouble can happen anywhere. Wyoming ranks 49th in violent crime but I always carry a gun. Apart from defense guns make noise when necessary. Should it be necessary I can euthanize an injured wild animal as well, not something I enjoy.

I believe that people should live where they wish to live. I'm living my dream; I hope you are as well.
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