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Old 11-22-2013, 05:11 AM
 
30,037 posts, read 35,229,823 times
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Forums are a compilation of other peoples lives and realities and perhaps ours being shared. It is up to each if us to dream and create our own personal reality. That's why I chuckle about some of the threads when we have anonymous strangers trying to convince us what we should think or want. For better or worse my life is my reality and the wife and I aren't complaining and sunrise and sunset are Gods message to us to hear as we want as are the seasons of the year.

 
Old 11-22-2013, 06:50 AM
 
Location: Verde Valley AZ
8,766 posts, read 9,841,864 times
Reputation: 11350
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gandalara View Post
Ah, but we desert dwellers fill our vehicle spaces with water. Lots and lots of water
Right! You never know when your car will overheat...or you might get thirsty! lol
 
Old 11-22-2013, 06:53 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 19,171,694 times
Reputation: 15656
I woke up to this story this morning, love it. A solo trip from here to the great states of Oklahoma and South Dakota at age 75, appreciating the simplest things. Maybe now that we have the new car we'll do something similar.

A Prius, a GPS and plenty of books on tape were all this 75-year-old Amherst woman needed to make a mostly solo 6,400 mile journey | Amherst Bulletin
 
Old 11-22-2013, 07:04 AM
 
Location: Maine
2,021 posts, read 2,736,091 times
Reputation: 2824
Thank you very much for sharing the story, Newenglandgirl. Ms. Eddy's intrepid spirit is inspiring, and her openness to seeing the parts of the United States she has never been to is a refreshing change.
 
Old 11-22-2013, 07:04 AM
 
Location: Virginia
18,717 posts, read 27,131,671 times
Reputation: 42872
Well, I'm back from pancakes and feeling much happier and more aligned with the real world. What a tonic it can be to go out and spend time in reality. Feeling better about moving here. That must have been a weird case of buyers remorse. It may not be Southern California but I do like it here quite a bit. I'm going to try to spend a lot more time exploring and less time on the internet. It's funny how you can use he internet to learn about anew town, but at the same time too much internet time can make me lose a realistic sense of what it's like to live in my own town. Strange, but true.

If I don't get back to this forum before then, have a nice thanksgiving everyone.
 
Old 11-22-2013, 10:04 AM
 
30,037 posts, read 35,229,823 times
Reputation: 11966
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caladium View Post
Well, I'm back from pancakes and feeling much happier and more aligned with the real world. What a tonic it can be to go out and spend time in reality. Feeling better about moving here. That must have been a weird case of buyers remorse. It may not be Southern California but I do like it here quite a bit. I'm going to try to spend a lot more time exploring and less time on the internet. It's funny how you can use he internet to learn about anew town, but at the same time too much internet time can make me lose a realistic sense of what it's like to live in my own town. Strange, but true.

If I don't get back to this forum before then, have a nice thanksgiving everyone.
Bada Bing and enjoy!
 
Old 11-22-2013, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Edina, MN, USA
6,977 posts, read 7,473,925 times
Reputation: 16359
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caladium View Post
Well, I'm back from pancakes and feeling much happier and more aligned with the real world. What a tonic it can be to go out and spend time in reality. Feeling better about moving here. That must have been a weird case of buyers remorse. It may not be Southern California but I do like it here quite a bit. I'm going to try to spend a lot more time exploring and less time on the internet. It's funny how you can use he internet to learn about anew town, but at the same time too much internet time can make me lose a realistic sense of what it's like to live in my own town. Strange, but true.

If I don't get back to this forum before then, have a nice thanksgiving everyone.
Could your emotions be an endorphin withdrawal? Endorphins are a drug and when you stop the running activity that you were doing in prep for your marathon, your body does go through a withdrawal and all sorts of emotion feelings can crop up. I had a neighbor that ran every morning - all 12 seasons. Then he damaged his knee and had to stop for a month. We rode the same bus to work and he got crabbier and crabbier - glad when he started running again. Huge personality change.
 
Old 11-22-2013, 07:35 PM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,633,970 times
Reputation: 22439
Quote:
Originally Posted by old_cold View Post
A warning about plastic tubs in ani.
We had a few stacks of them in the basement a couple of years ago that simply floated when the cellar got flooded (about 12 inches). Being stacked, any the top ones fell off when the bottom one started swimming and since they are waterproof lids, you can guess the rest.
Thank you for mentioning this. I can just see everything floating around . . .

Duct tape, here I come, lololol!!!

I typically do duct tape them when they are in storage for long periods but I have gotten very slack about replacing the tape in the last few years! GOOD REMINDER!!
 
Old 11-22-2013, 07:41 PM
Status: "Support the Mining Law of 1872" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,668 posts, read 11,127,014 times
Reputation: 19463
Default More survival kit miscellany

Flat tires are rare these days but they do happen. I was once driving a less traveled road in the Navajo Indian Reservation in the Four Corners area. I was on a dirt road and hadn't seen another car from the time I got on it. Suddenly the truck was wiggling around and wallowing; I had a very fast leak, not a blow out but I lost my air within thirty seconds. I had a good spare and all the tools to change the tire or so I thought. Before jacking up my truck I took the spinner, found the right size hole, and tried to turn it. It wouldn't turn. Whoever had put that wheel on had cranked up his impact wrench and put it on as securely as possible. I found the original tire tool and gave it a try, figuring it would give me more leverage. I'm sure it did but not enough.

My late wife told me to take a break and fixed sandwiches. After we ate I contemplated what to do next while my wife looked around for some piece of junk that might help. Truly, the gods were with her. She found a piece of pipe about two feet long. It slid over the tire tool and gave me the leverage I needed. I'd been afraid that the pipe might break with catastrophic results but it held.

I later learned that a piece of pipe used that way is called a cheater bar, a poor substitute for what mechanics usually call a breaker bar. A breaker bar is a bar at least 18" long. One end has a grip of roughened metal or something rubber-like. The other end has an anvil that fits into the back of a socket. They're available in different drive sizes. I bought a 1/2" that was 30" long. It was expensive; but I thought I better buy the best. Today, you can buy a used Snap-On on eBay for a much lower price than I paid twenty-five years ago. I later bought a 36" so both vehicles would have them.

Now, I could have avoided the problem if I had told the mechanic to back off and he had actually done so. But it never ocurred to me at the time so the base of a broken bottle nearly did me in. A breaker bar takes up very little room. I urge you all to buy one for each vehicle that leaves your driveway. I know that AAA fixes flats but you must be able to reach them. I was a hundred miles from a gas station and I have no idea how far from an AAA contractor.


A knife is one of the most basic tools that exists. Many people think that good knives cost a bundle but that is not the case. The Swedish Mora knife is a splendid tool at very reasonable price. It's the epitome of a good general purpose knife. It should be in your car.

Amazon.com: Morakniv Companion Fixed Blade Outdoor Knife with Sandvik Stainless Steel Blade, Green, 4.1-Inch: Sports & Outdoors

If you want more car survival talk there's currently a thread on S-S and P. Take a look but if you're inspired to discuss it post it here where people here are far less interested in defeating and destroying you. The S-S and P subforum is plagued by several of these worthies, one of whom is currently very active.

Car preparedness

I don't normally carry food in my survival kit during the summer months because of rapid spoilage due to extreme heat in vehicles. When I do carry it my choice has usually been peanut butter. But I've recently found some tasty pickled Polish sausage. The texture is good as well; it's not reminiscent of sawdust. Pickled meat has a very long shelf life. With the exception of very hot weather this could be an excellent vehicle food. You could, of course, pack some into a smaller jar if you wished.

An outside vendor sells this. You can cut the cost of shipping from 14.95 to 7.50 if you add a 4.50 jar of Border View Michigan Sauce. I know that sounds strange but it's true; it's like being paid three dollars to get the Michigan sauce. I hope that they don't catch this soon. Michigan sauce comes from upstate New York where it's made to create a Michigan-style hot dog, at least in their opinion. It's rather yummy. And it's not hot. It would be a neat dip for little sausages at cold weather gatherings.

Glazier Pickled Polish Sausage 3.8Lb: Amazon.com: Grocery & Gourmet Food

Michigan Sauce Meat Sauce for Your Hot Dog: Amazon.com: Grocery & Gourmet Food
 
Old 11-22-2013, 07:42 PM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,633,970 times
Reputation: 22439
CALADIUM: what I carry in my car has nothing to do with getting older. I have been doing this (and perfecting what I need) since I had my first car. My Dad was my mentor -- as he was a Marine and was well prepared for emergencies.

One year for my birthday, my dad gave me some new tarps to carry in my car, lol. I have used them many times! Even for picnics - put them on the ground b/f I throw down my blanket so my blanket stays dry, lol.

There is one thing I didn't mention that I always keep in any car we own. A CORK SCREW!!!! You never know when a bottle of wine might rate at the top of the emergency list, lololol!!!!
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