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Old 12-24-2013, 07:02 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 19,171,694 times
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I try to have on hand as many simple non-electric kitchen tools as possible. One indispensable one is a Foley food mill (will work well in place of electric blender). I'd keep one at the second house. You never know when in the mtns your electricity will go out. If you have a generator, that's a different story, but I rather like the idea of having no electricity for a period, as long as I have on hand lanterns and proper tools. Makes being in the mtns a nice alternative to regular life.

 
Old 12-24-2013, 11:40 AM
 
Location: too far from the sea
20,328 posts, read 19,311,428 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
I try to have on hand as many simple non-electric kitchen tools as possible. One indispensable one is a Foley food mill (will work well in place of electric blender). I'd keep one at the second house. You never know when in the mtns your electricity will go out. If you have a generator, that's a different story, but I rather like the idea of having no electricity for a period, as long as I have on hand lanterns and proper tools. Makes being in the mtns a nice alternative to regular life.
That sort of thinking goes along with your car preparedness. Is this a New England thing? Or a trait of those of us who live in disaster prone areas?

I do the same thing, of course. I have two egg beaters, finally got rid of the meat grinder, and a few other non electric gadgets. Just in case. I feel terrible not having a fireplace to cook over (I have the old cast iron pots with their covers) and to keep warm. You are better at this than I am!
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Old 12-24-2013, 03:39 PM
Status: "Support the Mining Law of 1872" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,668 posts, read 11,127,014 times
Reputation: 19463
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
I try to have on hand as many simple non-electric kitchen tools as possible. One indispensable one is a Foley food mill (will work well in place of electric blender). I'd keep one at the second house. You never know when in the mtns your electricity will go out. If you have a generator, that's a different story, but I rather like the idea of having no electricity for a period, as long as I have on hand lanterns and proper tools. Makes being in the mtns a nice alternative to regular life.
I bought one a couple of years ago and I have found it a nightmare to use. It keeps jamming. Perhaps you could make a video and post it.

Regarding hand tools for the kitchen as well as some old cooking techniques, I'm appending a link to food historian Ivan Day's website. He actually has a hearth in his home. Using a hearth is actually the only way to roast meat; cooking in any enclosed space is really baking. For those who would like more, I've appended a link to Bee Wilson's great history of kitchen equipment and much more. I learned about Ivan Day while reading her book.

Merry Christmas.

Historic Food Welcome

Amazon.com: Consider the Fork: A History of How We Cook and Eat eBook: Bee Wilson: Books
 
Old 12-24-2013, 03:48 PM
 
Location: UpstateNY
8,612 posts, read 8,427,479 times
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I had a bunch of vintage kitchen tools but sold them pending our move, they were great for display and I really enjoyed displaying them. I did keep the food mill.

Merry Christmas all, we are blessed.
 
Old 12-24-2013, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Edina, MN, USA
6,977 posts, read 7,473,925 times
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Happy Holidays to all the geezer chatters
 
Old 12-24-2013, 04:29 PM
 
Location: UpstateNY
8,612 posts, read 8,427,479 times
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Hey, I resemble that remark
 
Old 12-24-2013, 05:01 PM
 
Location: Florida
20,143 posts, read 20,252,538 times
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My favorite and much used non-electric kitchen tool is a hand chopper by Zyliss I first bought one, years ago, at a Pampered Chef party.
It's since been replaced by better(?? )models but I use it almost daily and will continue to do so until my hand can't tolerate the slamming any longer.
No worries about the power going out or a blender or food processor being out of commission.
For only the two of us most of the time, this thing requires a lot less cleanup and is just as fast.
 
Old 12-24-2013, 05:20 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
20,328 posts, read 19,311,428 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
I bought one a couple of years ago and I have found it a nightmare to use. It keeps jamming. Perhaps you could make a video and post it.

Regarding hand tools for the kitchen as well as some old cooking techniques, I'm appending a link to food historian Ivan Day's website. He actually has a hearth in his home. Using a hearth is actually the only way to roast meat; cooking in any enclosed space is really baking. For those who would like more, I've appended a link to Bee Wilson's great history of kitchen equipment and much more. I learned about Ivan Day while reading her book.

Merry Christmas.

Historic Food Welcome

Amazon.com: Consider the Fork: A History of How We Cook and Eat eBook: Bee Wilson: Books
I am very interested in this sort of thing. I'll definitely come back and take a better look at that website. One time I was going to take a class in Open Hearth Cooking and I have a book on it from Old Sturbridge Village in MA. Of course, there is the slight problem of no longer having a fireplace on which to do it.

MERRY CHRISTMAS TO ALL.
__________________
my posts as moderator will be in red. Moderator: Health&Wellness~Genealogy. The Rules--read here>>> TOS. If someone attacks you, do not reply. Hit REPORT.
 
Old 12-24-2013, 06:13 PM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,633,970 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PAhippo View Post
hey, green shorts, red feet.

could be the start of the latest fashion trend.
Gotta add a little fur trim . . . sounds Elven!!!!
 
Old 12-24-2013, 06:20 PM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,633,970 times
Reputation: 22439
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
I try to have on hand as many simple non-electric kitchen tools as possible. One indispensable one is a Foley food mill (will work well in place of electric blender). I'd keep one at the second house. You never know when in the mtns your electricity will go out. If you have a generator, that's a different story, but I rather like the idea of having no electricity for a period, as long as I have on hand lanterns and proper tools. Makes being in the mtns a nice alternative to regular life.
I used to have one - well, actually, I had one that was my grandmother's - she used it mainly when preparing foods for canning. It was so beaten up by the time my son was born, I got a new one, as I prepared all his food so I didn't have to buy commercial products.

I don't know what happened to it along the way and hadn't really thought about it til you mentioned it. Other than pureeing stuff, I don't think I ever used it once I no longer fixed my son pureed baby food.

I do have a french press . . . as long as I can boil coffee, I am going to have my coffee!!! lol
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