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Old 03-01-2014, 07:03 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 19,171,694 times
Reputation: 15656

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
I never heard of hostas until a few minutes ago.
You're not missing anything.



 
Old 03-01-2014, 07:18 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
20,328 posts, read 19,311,428 times
Reputation: 34750
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
You're not missing anything.


Oh, that's great--and so true. With all the attractive landscaping plants available why hostas. I have dug them where I used to live and given them away to get rid of them.
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Old 03-01-2014, 07:41 PM
 
Location: Edina, MN, USA
6,977 posts, read 7,473,925 times
Reputation: 16359
Hosta lover here. There are many different varieties and I have a couple of the blue ones and many others. Viva la hosta
 
Old 03-01-2014, 08:04 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
20,328 posts, read 19,311,428 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Umbria View Post
Hosta lover here. There are many different varieties and I have a couple of the blue ones and many others. Viva la hosta
It must take a special kind of person to love hostas.

I'm not a hosta appreciator.

I guess you either love them or hate them. (except for those who have never heard of them)
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Old 03-01-2014, 09:36 PM
 
Location: SoCal desert
8,092 posts, read 13,357,744 times
Reputation: 14875
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
I never heard of hostas until a few minutes ago.
Not surprised.
They don't like our climate.

I've tried, LOL
 
Old 03-02-2014, 06:01 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 19,171,694 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gandalara View Post
Not surprised.
They don't like our climate.

I've tried, LOL
There are so many beautiful ornamental grasses you can nurture in SoCal that need no care I can't imagine why anyone would even try hostas. Even their pale flower isn't special and hardly lasts. There's nothing more depressing than wilted yellowed hosta leaves August thru winter. This summer in the middle of the night while DH is sleeping I'm going to go out and take them all up, claiming a some wild animal got them. Only problem is he'll go out and buy more.
 
Old 03-02-2014, 06:06 AM
 
Location: UpstateNY
8,612 posts, read 8,427,479 times
Reputation: 7530
Ours stay green until late September. They're very popular up here. Neighbors come in the spring to get free ones from my well established ones. The variegated green and white leafed ones are most prized.

Our brief reprise from the cold leaves tonight, back to brrrrrrrrrr until Friday. Blech.
 
Old 03-02-2014, 06:53 AM
 
Location: Waterville
332 posts, read 432,833 times
Reputation: 775
Hostas are wonderful plants. Unless we are speaking of the old-timey hold-overs from the 1800's. Bleech.

The Japanese have introduced many splendid new cultivars in a range of color, form, and size that add dimension and visual interest to a shade garden. They can be very expensive. If you are a sun-worshipper and believe that garden plants need always to possess colorful blooms, then the shade garden is not for you. However, if like me, you cannot abide heat and sun, the shade garden is an edenic idyll that relaxes the eye and soothes the jangled nerves. Upon the departure of the white winter canvas what can be more satisfying than a blanket of green in all its infinite variety of hue?
 
Old 03-02-2014, 08:38 AM
 
Location: too far from the sea
20,328 posts, read 19,311,428 times
Reputation: 34750
Quote:
Originally Posted by foglover View Post
Hostas are wonderful plants. Unless we are speaking of the old-timey hold-overs from the 1800's. Bleech.

The Japanese have introduced many splendid new cultivars in a range of color, form, and size that add dimension and visual interest to a shade garden. They can be very expensive. If you are a sun-worshipper and believe that garden plants need always to possess colorful blooms, then the shade garden is not for you. However, if like me, you cannot abide heat and sun, the shade garden is an edenic idyll that relaxes the eye and soothes the jangled nerves. Upon the departure of the white winter canvas what can be more satisfying than a blanket of green in all its infinite variety of hue?
Well, I must be thinking of the old-timey ones. The ragged, bug eaten ugly hostas that take up space along the foundations of old houses.

I had a shade garden that I started in my forested backyard--it had local woodland wildflowers (purchased from a special farm, not stolen from the woods) and dwarf crested iris, astilbe, various native ground covers like Partridge berry, deep green moss, but nary a hosta to be found!

I'll concede that probably some of the newer versions are nice. I've seen way too many of the ugly ones to ever appreciate any hosta.
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Old 03-02-2014, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Waterville
332 posts, read 432,833 times
Reputation: 775
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
Well, I must be thinking of the old-timey ones. The ragged, bug eaten ugly hostas that take up space along the foundations of old houses.

I had a shade garden that I started in my forested backyard--it had local woodland wildflowers (purchased from a special farm, not stolen from the woods) and dwarf crested iris, astilbe, various native ground covers like Partridge berry, deep green moss, but nary a hosta to be found!

I'll concede that probably some of the newer versions are nice. I've seen way too many of the ugly ones to ever appreciate any hosta.
Have never seen any bug that dined on hosta. But yes, those old-timey ones are shapeless. Of the newer ones there are some whose individual leaves are taller than me. Then there are the minis. Paired with any of the heucheras and heucherellas, backed up with rhododendrons and aruncus, et voila, c'est bonne.

Your woodland garden sounds lovely.
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