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Old 04-01-2014, 02:59 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 19,169,159 times
Reputation: 15656

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Quote:
Originally Posted by CCc girl View Post
I wonder how many mods there are? I also wonder how many posters are here sometimes. Mind boggling.

Still no water in the basement and the melt is running down my back stone steps from the barn like a small creek.

YAY
It is MUD season in the North! Hooray! Just got my shoe stuck in the mud on a path around a pond while walking the dogs. Must soon take them for their "spring cleaning" drive-thru dog wash. Then they'll get all mucked up all over again, lol.

 
Old 04-01-2014, 03:01 PM
 
Location: Nebraska
1,157 posts, read 1,020,100 times
Reputation: 1030
Looks like we might lose some of our TV stations. Our cable company is in a dispute with Viacom. We don't watch any of the stations affected.
 
Old 04-01-2014, 07:10 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,017 posts, read 17,936,627 times
Reputation: 32336
Default Here's a novel retirement location criterion:

I just noticed a thread in the Vegetarian and Vegan Food Forum requesting suggestions for vegan-friendly retirement locations. Apparently some people take that stuff pretty seriously, as one poster mentioned his wife takes a vegan knitting class! (I assume that means they don't knit with wool).

Sometimes I wonder if there is anything so bizarre that it can't be found on City-Data! LOL
 
Old 04-01-2014, 07:13 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 19,169,159 times
Reputation: 15656
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
I just noticed a thread in the Vegetarian and Vegan Food Forum requesting suggestions for vegan-friendly retirement locations. Apparently some people take that stuff pretty seriously, as one poster mentioned his wife takes a vegan knitting class! (I assume that means they don't knit with wool).
You haven't seen the latest scarves knitted with cooked pasta?
 
Old 04-01-2014, 07:38 PM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,627,864 times
Reputation: 22439
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
I just noticed a thread in the Vegetarian and Vegan Food Forum requesting suggestions for vegan-friendly retirement locations. Apparently some people take that stuff pretty seriously, as one poster mentioned his wife takes a vegan knitting class! (I assume that means they don't knit with wool).

Sometimes I wonder if there is anything so bizarre that it can't be found on City-Data! LOL
I guess folks with similar interests like to do other things together but that is so . . . unusual. Do they bring a lot of food to meet ups where they sit and knit and eat vegan goodies? Not putting anyone down - to each his own - but it does seem quite curious, why it would matter what someone's gastronomic preferences are in regard to a knitting group.
 
Old 04-01-2014, 07:40 PM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,627,864 times
Reputation: 22439
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
you haven't seen the latest scarves knitted with cooked pasta?
:d:d:d
 
Old 04-01-2014, 08:15 PM
 
Location: Waterville
332 posts, read 432,771 times
Reputation: 775
Quote:
Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
I guess folks with similar interests like to do other things together but that is so . . . unusual. Do they bring a lot of food to meet ups where they sit and knit and eat vegan goodies? Not putting anyone down - to each his own - but it does seem quite curious, why it would matter what someone's gastronomic preferences are in regard to a knitting group.
My guess is that these knitters use non-animal fibers only. Yarn can be spun from bamboo, hemp, flax, soy,and something called milk protein fiber. The total vegan is conscientious in her attempt to avoid animal exploitation. This means that silk is also on the no-no list.

The spinning and knitting folks comprise a surprisingly large sub-culture, and plant fibers are now being used by many non-vegans. They have some interesting properties but they cannot be felted.
 
Old 04-02-2014, 06:15 AM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
2,516 posts, read 1,741,983 times
Reputation: 9036
Quote:
The spinning and knitting folks comprise a surprisingly large sub-culture, and plant fibers are now being used by many non-vegans. They have some interesting properties but they cannot be felted.
I belong to that sub culture, it's always interesting. Vegan knitters work with non animal fiber, either out of personal convictions or allergies to animal fibers. Shearing animals for fiber is acceptable to me other than practices used by some Australian breeders. As far as the plant based fibers, many are produced using a rayon type extrusion process that isn't very environmentally friendly.

Silk production kills the silk worm although there is a silk sold by a company doesn't kill the worms, for a higher price of course. There is even organic wool, I'm leery of that claim and again it is higher priced. I wanted to grow a cotton plant, but they are not allowed in FL, or any cotton producing state because of boll weevils.

I've processed a sheep fleece; washing, carding and spinning it to use in weaving and knitting. It was interesting to do, but labor intensive. I'm happy buying processed fiber but still spinning it. Spinning can be a very meditative activity, it is for me. I belong to a guild in NY and one in FL, both have many members, I'm always happy to find others that love all things fiber.

There is wool fiber and yarn produced called super wash that does not felt. The fiber is processed dissolving the microscopic scale structure, which is what grabs together and felts. Of course there are sheep breeds that have fleeces that are more difficult to felt too.

Oops, sorry, my passion is showing.
 
Old 04-02-2014, 09:32 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,627,864 times
Reputation: 22439
Quote:
Originally Posted by foglover View Post
My guess is that these knitters use non-animal fibers only. Yarn can be spun from bamboo, hemp, flax, soy,and something called milk protein fiber. The total vegan is conscientious in her attempt to avoid animal exploitation. This means that silk is also on the no-no list.

The spinning and knitting folks comprise a surprisingly large sub-culture, and plant fibers are now being used by many non-vegans. They have some interesting properties but they cannot be felted.
How interesting! Now I get it!!!!

Thank you for sharing this information.
 
Old 04-02-2014, 09:35 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,627,864 times
Reputation: 22439
Quote:
Originally Posted by jean_ji View Post
I belong to that sub culture, it's always interesting. Vegan knitters work with non animal fiber, either out of personal convictions or allergies to animal fibers. Shearing animals for fiber is acceptable to me other than practices used by some Australian breeders. As far as the plant based fibers, many are produced using a rayon type extrusion process that isn't very environmentally friendly.

Silk production kills the silk worm although there is a silk sold by a company doesn't kill the worms, for a higher price of course. There is even organic wool, I'm leery of that claim and again it is higher priced. I wanted to grow a cotton plant, but they are not allowed in FL, or any cotton producing state because of boll weevils.

I've processed a sheep fleece; washing, carding and spinning it to use in weaving and knitting. It was interesting to do, but labor intensive. I'm happy buying processed fiber but still spinning it. Spinning can be a very meditative activity, it is for me. I belong to a guild in NY and one in FL, both have many members, I'm always happy to find others that love all things fiber.

There is wool fiber and yarn produced called super wash that does not felt. The fiber is processed dissolving the microscopic scale structure, which is what grabs together and felts. Of course there are sheep breeds that have fleeces that are more difficult to felt too.

Oops, sorry, my passion is showing.
Nothing wrong with showing your passion! So glad you explained this as I was totally unaware of the many facets of spinning, different yarns, fibers, etc.

I would think it could be quite meditative.

In literature, women who are sitting and spinning are often the "wise women" or even the "magickal" women in their culture/the story.
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