U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 07-26-2014, 06:40 AM
Status: "Support the Mining Law of 1872" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,658 posts, read 11,115,133 times
Reputation: 19436

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by CCc girl View Post
Boo Ryan, today I will shop with only change and no bills just so I can p1$$ off people like you. I look at an elder in front of me and think, there but for the Grace of God is me.
Some stores use a special crayon to check the authenticity of large denomination bills. So here's my idea. Get one of these crayons. When you go to the store check all of the bills you receive in change to make sure that none is a counterfeit. Be sure to check each one carefully. Of course, I advise counting coins one by one. If someone should dare make some contumelious comment be sure to retort, "Wait 'til you're my age, etc." Mumbling to yourself is always a nice touch.

When you're stopped for a light and a tourist asks you a question always give a full and detailed explanation. If the light is still read start telling some long and rambling story about the builing that used to be across the street but was torn down in 1937. If it's a four lane street, work with a partner. The other one will pull up next to you and appear to be listening to your directions for the tourist, then get out of the other car and walk slowly over to you and begin to argue. Try to surround the tourist to prevent an escape. When the tourist finally gets away both you and your parter should walk, or better still waddle, back to your cars. Be sure to talk to yourselves when you do this.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-26-2014, 08:12 AM
 
Location: Edina, MN, USA
6,977 posts, read 7,468,919 times
Reputation: 16359
Quote:
Originally Posted by CCc girl View Post
Boo Ryan, today I will shop with only change and no bills just so I can p1$$ off people like you. I look at an elder in front of me and think, there but for the Grace of God is me.

{{{{{{{{{{{Zugor}}}}}}}}}} glad you're back!!!!!!!!!!
I think they're cute and I hope I can still do that at their age. If it's not an elderly person I want to get out my cattle prod.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-26-2014, 08:17 AM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,757 posts, read 4,271,197 times
Reputation: 6868
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryanberch View Post
Bravo. In the supermarket, when I see some "old lady" in line, I get into a different line. What's with the counting out every penny of change? Haven't they heard--use a debit or credit card and then you don't need that change purse you purchased in 1990! Seniors make up 25% of the population in my town and I just don't get how some of them have gotten stuck in 1960. And if they need to have a conversation with the checker because they don't realize others are waiting in line and have busy lives, then please just hire an escort for companionship.
I remember when I was a 16 year old bakery clerk and clenching my teeth every time a customer pulled out her change purse and counted out the coins. It drove me bats*** crazy. Up until a few weeks ago, I rarely used cash. After learning that some hospitals, physicians and insurance companies were purchasing identifiable data from information brokers to facilitate preventive care, I rebelled.

Your Doctor Knows You're Killing Yourself. The Data Brokers Told Her - Bloomberg

Hospitals Are Mining Patients' Credit Card Data to Predict Who Will Get Sick - Businessweek

I no longer use an identifiable loyalty card and I usually pay with cash. After I sign up for a few more loyalty cards under assumed names, I will always use cash for those purchases.

I've had alias loyalty cards for years, but I'm thinking about taking it to a new level.

I may start splitting my groceries into two separate purchases. I'll use my credit card and "identifiable" loyalty card to pay for the healthy pile and my alias loyalty card with cash to pay for the Ben & Jerry's, etc. It will be as if I'm shopping for my friend and need a separate receipt. If I go to the store intending to do this, I promise I'll only do this during the "off" hours.

Hmmm. Maybe I'll add a new but transient member to my household. The possibilities are endless.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-26-2014, 08:50 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,609,304 times
Reputation: 22437
Quote:
Originally Posted by lenora View Post
I remember when I was a 16 year old bakery clerk and clenching my teeth every time a customer pulled out her change purse and counted out the coins. It drove me bats*** crazy. Up until a few weeks ago, I rarely used cash. After learning that some hospitals, physicians and insurance companies were purchasing identifiable data from information brokers to facilitate preventive care, I rebelled.

Your Doctor Knows You're Killing Yourself. The Data Brokers Told Her - Bloomberg

Hospitals Are Mining Patients' Credit Card Data to Predict Who Will Get Sick - Businessweek

I no longer use an identifiable loyalty card and I usually pay with cash. After I sign up for a few more loyalty cards under assumed names, I will always use cash for those purchases.

I've had alias loyalty cards for years, but I'm thinking about taking it to a new level.

I may start splitting my groceries into two separate purchases. I'll use my credit card and "identifiable" loyalty card to pay for the healthy pile and my alias loyalty card with cash to pay for the Ben & Jerry's, etc. It will be as if I'm shopping for my friend and need a separate receipt. If I go to the store intending to do this, I promise I'll only do this during the "off" hours.

Hmmm. Maybe I'll add a new but transient member to my household. The possibilities are endless.
Yeah, since I have been in a field that buys that data . . . I refused to have ANY of the loyalty cards. In fact, I refused to have an ATM card. I managed to stick to my guns until maybe 5 years ago. My husband would not comply, so little by little, he completely eroded our avoiding data mining by hooking up everything to those cards. I just gave up eventually, got an ATM card, loyalty cards, etc.

I used only cash for the majority of my purchases. But then, that meant keeping careful track of my receipts. After while, I got tired of being accused of "missing something" when hubby was working on taxes, so I gave up on that, as well, lol.

If I were on my own, I wouldn't have any identifying info attached to any account -- use cash except for such things as airplane tickets. But I am not by myself and the damage has been done.

I do like the idea of using 2 different loyalty cards, insofar as that is a way of protecting data. As far as dividing stuff up and going through the work that takes, sounds awfully labor intense to me.

I would add . . . since every loyalty card I own is attached to a phone number, eventually, it becomes highly unlikely that folks won't match up two different cards to the same owner. Even if you use a landline number for one and a cell # for the other, those numbers are being matched up per single owner in some "cloud" somewhere.

Let me tell ya . . . what blew our minds a couple months ago was that a doc in one location gave hubby a particular script in a location 4 1/2 hours away from the docs we were working with at Duke Med. Since it was cheaper to buy at WalMart than to run it through insurance, hubby went to WalMart, did not submit insurance info, and purchased with his ATM card.

Less than a week later, we were at Duke Med Ctr, about 4 1/2 hours away from the first location, and when we were going over meds, it showed the purchase on a printout from Duke. Yep. The purchase at WalMart, which was not submitted for coverage under insurance/Medicare, and the date it was purchased, showed up on the list. It even notated that the prescription was filed with WalMart.

Post Surgery, we bought supplies at WalMart (gauze, ace bandages, etc). When we went back to Duke, they also had those supplies (again, no insurance submitted on that stuff, of course) on a list as part of a separate list of additional things we would need. How the hell did they do that? Hubby's name has obviously been flagged and I guess inventory numbers associated w/ various products are culled from any transactions at WalMart that are attached to his name via debit or credit card. That's all we could figure out.

Last edited by brokensky; 07-26-2014 at 09:00 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-26-2014, 08:59 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,017 posts, read 17,928,294 times
Reputation: 32336
Default ATM cards

Quote:
Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
Yeah, since I have been in a field that buys that data . . . I refused to have ANY of the loyalty cards. In fact, I refused to have an ATM card. I managed to stick to my guns until maybe 5 years ago. My husband would not comply, so little by little, he completely eroded our avoiding data mining by hooking up everything to those cards. I just gave up eventually, got an ATM card, loyalty cards, etc.

I used only cash for the majority of my purchases. But then, that meant keeping careful track of my receipts. After while, I got tired of being accused of "missing something" when hubby was working on taxes, so I gave up on that, as well, lol.

If I were on my own, I wouldn't have any identifying info attached to any account -- use cash except for such things as airplane tickets. But I am not by myself and the damage has been done.

I do like the idea of using 2 different loyalty cards, insofar as that is a way of protecting data. As far as dividing stuff up and going through the work that takes, sounds awfully labor intense to me.
Ani, please help me understand how an ATM card allows data mining. I only use mine to get cash and to deposit the occasional paper check via the ATM itself. Of course my bank can tell I am traveling if I use the card in a different city.

A credit card, that I understand. But not the ATM card, unless you are talking about using it as a debit card also. I avoid that by requesting that my bank issue me an ATM (only) card which is not also a debit card. They did so without objection, although I suppose I am a rarity.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-26-2014, 09:06 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,609,304 times
Reputation: 22437
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Ani, please help me understand how an ATM card allows data mining. I only use mine to get cash and to deposit the occasional paper check via the ATM itself. Of course my bank can tell I am traveling if I use the card in a different city.

A credit card, that I understand. But not the ATM card, unless you are talking about using it as a debit card also. I avoid that by requesting that my bank issue me an ATM (only) card which is not also a debit card. They did so without objection, although I suppose I am a rarity.
ATM cards totally confuse me, as essentially, they were issued to "work" like a traditional check "works." But actually, they are in a separate database that operates like a credit card.

Perhaps you have avoided such a database by not using your ATM card as a debit or credit card. I use mine as both.

I am overwhelmed by the web of surveillance that I have gotten into . . . some of it occurred when I willfully signed up for online banking and online bill payments. I knew what that was all about and because of convenience, I chose to go that route and give up some of my privacy (and I was aware that identity theft was a real possibility, as well). The rest of it is what I consider so passive . . . that the consumer in general has no clue he/she is being "tracked."

There is some server somewhere, I would suppose, that keeps a track of every purchase we make, whether in person or online. If they scan your license or take down that info, even then, without a credit card involved, your info must be matched up somewhere -- with an aggregate of all sorts of other info about each of us, down to how much electricity we consume monthly.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-26-2014, 09:07 AM
 
10,849 posts, read 8,193,902 times
Reputation: 17170
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
In other words, I assume that your responses are more on the level of rhetoric than of reality. Our fellow human beings are all worthy of our respect; going out of our way to irritate them just engenders more ill will, of which there is already far too much in this world.
Not just Ryan, but anyone who gets bent out of shape over an elderly person counting out cash is actively seeking any excuse to feel ill will. I'm happy to oblige. (disclosure: I carry only a CC and my cellphone, never ever cash, so would have to make the effort)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-26-2014, 09:14 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,609,304 times
Reputation: 22437
I would add . . . I talked to a Duke Power rep recently, and asked her how it was that a graph appears with my bill monthly, showing how much I electricity I use for cooking, as opposed to laundry, showers, electronic appliances and devices, etc. She said that there are sensors on different appliances as well as sensors on my meter that differentiate that info.

Sounded like BS to me, but then I read an article shortly afterwards that said we are all being tracked as to our private energy useage, and electric companies can differentiate down to day and time what appliances we are using, or how much hot water, or if we are using a dryer as opposed to a TV, etc. I find the whole thing mind boggling and it begs the question: WHY?????
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-26-2014, 09:16 AM
 
10,849 posts, read 8,193,902 times
Reputation: 17170
Quote:
Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
I would add . . . since every loyalty card I own is attached to a phone number, eventually, it becomes highly unlikely that folks won't match up two different cards to the same owner. Even if you use a landline number for one and a cell # for the other, those numbers are being matched up per single owner in some "cloud" somewhere.
I fill in all those forms with my Google voice # that I don't really use for anything else.
Problem is, of course, you have to assign the Google voice # to a working landline or cell; right now it's tied to my cell phone. Been thinking of buying a throwaway cell just for that purpose. The privacy would be worth the $15 or so.

I also have a special email address for all those junk requests.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-26-2014, 09:25 AM
 
10,849 posts, read 8,193,902 times
Reputation: 17170
Quote:
Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
Sounded like BS to me, but then I read an article shortly afterwards that said we are all being tracked as to our private energy useage, and electric companies can differentiate down to day and time what appliances we are using, or how much hot water, or if we are using a dryer as opposed to a TV, etc. I find the whole thing mind boggling and it begs the question: WHY?????
DH's 45-year career was in the electric power industry. It's total BS.
They can make assumptions based upon how many kw hours you consume in a given time period. For example, a tv uses way less energy than most household appliances and an electric-powered HVAC usually tops them all. But they're only guesses - for all the power company knows, you've plugged in the vacuum cleaner and power saw and let them run all day. They don't care.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:05 AM.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top