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Old 08-12-2014, 11:13 AM
 
Location: Edina, MN, USA
6,977 posts, read 7,473,925 times
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It is so sad about robin W - what a great performer. Alcohol is a depressant and I think after so many years your brain just doesn't recover.

He hid behind laughter & jokes. Huge loss.

 
Old 08-12-2014, 12:48 PM
 
Location: UpstateNY
8,612 posts, read 8,427,479 times
Reputation: 7530
I think Depression was the killer here. Not being depressed. Apparently there is a difference. Sad sad sad.
 
Old 08-12-2014, 04:29 PM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,633,970 times
Reputation: 22439
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZDesertBrat View Post
I think one of the things that helped me enjoy Santa Fe was staying in a B&B rather than an overpriced motel. The owners were lovely people, had good suggestions for things to do and see and were just super. I had my own little "casita" which was really nice and a private patio to enjoy.
Oh, AZDesertBrat -- that sounds absolutely delightful! Maybe good fortune will shine on me and at some point, I will be able to return. I will remember your advice and seek out my own little casita!
 
Old 08-12-2014, 04:37 PM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,633,970 times
Reputation: 22439
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhxBarb View Post
Ani: I too was shocked and near tears hearing this awful news. Depression is an illness I have encountered and thankfully found the right help for many years ago, thanks to a wonderful psychiatrist who meant everything to me, because he saved my life. When something like the death of RW happens, it makes me stop and think how lucky I am to have found a "cure". For people who have never suffered from this, you just have no idea how awful it can be.
Yes, and that is what I thought about, too, Barb. My first hope was that Williams' soul was at peace and then to remember his family and what a struggle there are doubtless dealing with right now.

My second thought was in re: to myself and my own depression, which I struggled with for several years, silently and alone. In the final months, I woke up every day and had a talk with myself about finding one reason to not end my misery. It always ended up being -- my son -- that everyone else could accept my decision to exit the planet, but my son wouldn't and he might feel he was in some way responsible, as that is what often happens to children of parents who complete suicide.

So I know that deep, dark hole of despair and only wish that someone amongst us could have reached Williams at that moment when he decided he had no reason to stay alive that day. Hit me hard, too.
 
Old 08-13-2014, 09:36 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,017 posts, read 17,939,286 times
Reputation: 32336
I returned last night from my road trip in the longest day's drive of the 25 days I was gone: 784 miles from Albuquerque, New Mexico to Los Angeles. I drove a total of 5,335 miles, averaged 24.8 miles per gallon (not bad for driving mostly between 80 and 85 miles per hour), and spent $830.70 on gas. Never exceeded 110 miles per hour the whole time. No mechanical problems, no speeding tickets, no accidents, no illnesses. I normally drove about 10 mph over the speed limit, but always tried not to stick out; if most people were going 80, I went 81.

1. Driving conditions: I was mostly on interstates - some of the most boring driving there is. It is amazing how much work is being done on the interstates, which I suppose is necessary to keep the aging roadways in good condition. No matter what state I was in, sooner or later (often sooner) there would be one lane shut down, sometimes for quite a few miles. Good thing I was in no particular hurry.

2. Highlights: Almost all the museums I visited (about a dozen), the Ricky Skaggs bluegrass concert at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, and the flamenco performance in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The most off-beat museum was the Rattlesnake Museum in Albuquerque - lots of live specimens but no petting allowed. Other highlights were visiting 10 cousins, some of whom I hadn't seen in eight years.

I loved my trip but after being gone about two and a half weeks I started getting the desire to be home. So yes, it's good to be home.

Last edited by Escort Rider; 08-13-2014 at 10:09 PM..
 
Old 08-14-2014, 06:15 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 19,171,694 times
Reputation: 15656
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
I returned last night from my road trip in the longest day's drive of the 25 days I was gone: 784 miles from Albuquerque, New Mexico to Los Angeles. I drove a total of 5,335 miles, averaged 24.8 miles per gallon (not bad for driving mostly between 80 and 85 miles per hour), and spent $830.70 on gas. Never exceeded 110 miles per hour the whole time. No mechanical problems, no speeding tickets, no accidents, no illnesses. I normally drove about 10 mph over the speed limit, but always tried not to stick out; if most people were going 80, I went 81.

1. Driving conditions: I was mostly on interstates - some of the most boring driving there is. It is amazing how much work is being done on the interstates, which I suppose is necessary to keep the aging roadways in good condition. No matter what state I was in, sooner or later (often sooner) there would be one lane shut down, sometimes for quite a few miles. Good thing I was in no particular hurry.

2. Highlights: Almost all the museums I visited (about a dozen), the Ricky Skaggs bluegrass concert at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, and the flamenco performance in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The most off-beat museum was the Rattlesnake Museum in Albuquerque - lots of live specimens but no petting allowed. Other highlights were visiting 10 cousins, some of whom I hadn't seen in eight years.

I loved my trip but after being gone about two and a half weeks I started getting the desire to be home. So yes, it's good to be home.
Post some pics (not of the snake museum). Did you happen to stop by the Barbed Wire Museum in Hays, KS?
 
Old 08-14-2014, 07:21 AM
 
Location: too far from the sea
20,328 posts, read 19,311,428 times
Reputation: 34750
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
I returned last night from my road trip in the longest day's drive of the 25 days I was gone: 784 miles from Albuquerque, New Mexico to Los Angeles. I drove a total of 5,335 miles, averaged 24.8 miles per gallon (not bad for driving mostly between 80 and 85 miles per hour), and spent $830.70 on gas. Never exceeded 110 miles per hour the whole time. No mechanical problems, no speeding tickets, no accidents, no illnesses. I normally drove about 10 mph over the speed limit, but always tried not to stick out; if most people were going 80, I went 81.

1. Driving conditions: I was mostly on interstates - some of the most boring driving there is. It is amazing how much work is being done on the interstates, which I suppose is necessary to keep the aging roadways in good condition. No matter what state I was in, sooner or later (often sooner) there would be one lane shut down, sometimes for quite a few miles. Good thing I was in no particular hurry.

2. Highlights: Almost all the museums I visited (about a dozen), the Ricky Skaggs bluegrass concert at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, and the flamenco performance in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The most off-beat museum was the Rattlesnake Museum in Albuquerque - lots of live specimens but no petting allowed. Other highlights were visiting 10 cousins, some of whom I hadn't seen in eight years.

I loved my trip but after being gone about two and a half weeks I started getting the desire to be home. So yes, it's good to be home.
There's no place like home!

I didn't realize so much work was being done on the interstates. We keep hearing how the nation's infrastructure is falling apart so it's reassuring to know that something is being done about it. I wish the state roads around here could get some attention, and the bridges--yeeeeeek.

I took a driving vacation across the country and back again in the olde days and camped all the way. It was totally great. Camped at that base of Mt Rushmore and looked up in through the tent windows at a row of presidents, swam in the Great Salt Lake, car broke down on those boring straight miles of salt flats, enjoyed Bryce and Zion Parks. Favorite place was Yellowstone. We did stay with some relatives so I did get to see regular places too.

Ended up in the Everglades National Park in August=big mistake. Florida in August=big mistake. Now we just drive down to Virginia for Christmas or up to Maine for summer gorgeousness.

You are quite a driver, ER, to tackle a trip like that all on your own and be responsible for every little thing that could or did happen. I think it also requires an independent spirit. Welcome home.
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Old 08-14-2014, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,017 posts, read 17,939,286 times
Reputation: 32336
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
There's no place like home!

I didn't realize so much work was being done on the interstates. We keep hearing how the nation's infrastructure is falling apart so it's reassuring to know that something is being done about it. I wish the state roads around here could get some attention, and the bridges--yeeeeeek.

I took a driving vacation across the country and back again in the olde days and camped all the way. It was totally great. Camped at that base of Mt Rushmore and looked up in through the tent windows at a row of presidents, swam in the Great Salt Lake, car broke down on those boring straight miles of salt flats, enjoyed Bryce and Zion Parks. Favorite place was Yellowstone. We did stay with some relatives so I did get to see regular places too.

Ended up in the Everglades National Park in August=big mistake. Florida in August=big mistake. Now we just drive down to Virginia for Christmas or up to Maine for summer gorgeousness.

You are quite a driver, ER, to tackle a trip like that all on your own and be responsible for every little thing that could or did happen. I think it also requires an independent spirit. Welcome home.
Thank you. Some people like road trips and some people don't. Another poster in another thread recently wrote that "car trips are a special hell for people who can't afford to fly. Only a bus could be worse." Needless to say I don't agree. Anyway I'm glad you have fond memories of road trips from your younger days.

One concession I've made to age is that I no longer take a tent, even as a back-up. Motels are so much more convenient and comfortable for me at age 70.
 
Old 08-14-2014, 07:58 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,633,970 times
Reputation: 22439
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
I returned last night from my road trip in the longest day's drive of the 25 days I was gone: 784 miles from Albuquerque, New Mexico to Los Angeles. I drove a total of 5,335 miles, averaged 24.8 miles per gallon (not bad for driving mostly between 80 and 85 miles per hour), and spent $830.70 on gas. Never exceeded 110 miles per hour the whole time. No mechanical problems, no speeding tickets, no accidents, no illnesses. I normally drove about 10 mph over the speed limit, but always tried not to stick out; if most people were going 80, I went 81.

1. Driving conditions: I was mostly on interstates - some of the most boring driving there is. It is amazing how much work is being done on the interstates, which I suppose is necessary to keep the aging roadways in good condition. No matter what state I was in, sooner or later (often sooner) there would be one lane shut down, sometimes for quite a few miles. Good thing I was in no particular hurry.

2. Highlights: Almost all the museums I visited (about a dozen), the Ricky Skaggs bluegrass concert at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, and the flamenco performance in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The most off-beat museum was the Rattlesnake Museum in Albuquerque - lots of live specimens but no petting allowed. Other highlights were visiting 10 cousins, some of whom I hadn't seen in eight years.

I loved my trip but after being gone about two and a half weeks I started getting the desire to be home. So yes, it's good to be home.
Glad you arrived safely! I thought about you when I saw all the flooding yesterday in Albuquerque!

That was quite the trip. The longest road trip I have taken was 1000 miles each way and that was a regular trip back and forth from Kansas City to NC. I enjoy driving and so have often thought I would be a good candidate to take a trip across country. I have had some issues come up mechanically with vehicles over the years, but things one might expect - tires, water pump, windshield wipers suddenly shredding. Rock cracking my windshield. But no accidents.

I know folks that take off on journeys of a month or more but I find I want to be back home b/f three weeks are up. I know what you mean . . . ready to get back and settle in after 2 1/2 weeks. So good you could do this and catch up with relatives, too.

You've had quite the adventure!
 
Old 08-14-2014, 08:20 AM
 
Location: Edina, MN, USA
6,977 posts, read 7,473,925 times
Reputation: 16359
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Thank you. Some people like road trips and some people don't. Another poster in another thread recently wrote that "car trips are a special hell for people who can't afford to fly. Only a bus could be worse." Needless to say I don't agree. Anyway I'm glad you have fond memories of road trips from your younger days.

One concession I've made to age is that I no longer take a tent, even as a back-up. Motels are so much more convenient and comfortable for me at age 70.
Great trip! I seem to remember reading the same type of comment about people driving because they can't afford to fly. When you consider the gas (interstate gas prices are much higher) + lodging it's not cheaper to go by car but it's my choice also - if I have the time. There's so much more freedom that way and you're not tied to schedules. Plus flying these days is a real pain. I flew a lot with my jobs but I didn't really see the country because I flew over it so I saw the airport and the building I was in all day + a restaurant or two. There were times I extended my stay and then toured the area.

For some reason, when my dogs are with me I don't feel quite alone - even though one can be a PIA. You really should take a pup with your next time.

You don't fit the stereotype of the 70 year old driver - a regular hot rodder.

I'm always happy when I pull into my driveway. Glad you made it without incident.
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