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Old 09-09-2015, 10:20 PM
 
10,851 posts, read 8,203,309 times
Reputation: 17210

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Quote:
Originally Posted by NYgal2NC View Post
I think a lot of us have been told to speak what's on our mind. But what about tact and love for the person you are saying it to? Am I being too sensitive?
No you're not being too sensitive. If tact and love are what's on your mind, then speak your mind. If not, then don't.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
However, one can be part of the "not PC crowd" while still retaining basic manners.
I want to agree with this but am struggling. Can you give a current example, ideally without turning this into a P&OC topic??

 
Old 09-10-2015, 02:23 PM
 
1,645 posts, read 631,336 times
Reputation: 3538
PhxBarb -- She is at Bronswood Cemetery in Oak Brook, on Madison St north of Ogden Ave, and a host of others are at the big Catholic cemeteries on Wolf Rd / Eisenhower Expressway, etc........ There is a beautiful pet cemetery south of Clarendon Hills. My dad and I used to take bicycle rides and sometimes go in there and walk around. What a fascinating place! Here's the link in case some of you want to take a peek:http://petcemetery.org/. I do not know anyone who actually has a pet buried there, but it is a beautiful resting place. PS -- I'm sure your mom will love the bulbs!!
 
Old 09-11-2015, 09:37 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,017 posts, read 17,939,286 times
Reputation: 32336
It is gratifying at the end of the day not to get down in the mud to wrestle with a pig. Let the moderators deal with it!
 
Old 09-11-2015, 10:17 AM
 
Location: middle tennessee
1,959 posts, read 1,029,782 times
Reputation: 7272
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
It is gratifying at the end of the day not to get down in the mud to wrestle with a pig. Let the moderators deal with it!
and think how relieved the pig must be
 
Old 09-11-2015, 11:33 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,017 posts, read 17,939,286 times
Reputation: 32336
Quote:
Originally Posted by newcomputer View Post
and think how relieved the pig must be
No, I rather imagine the pig enjoys it - why would they be acting like a pig in the first place?
 
Old 09-11-2015, 01:24 PM
 
1,594 posts, read 2,238,491 times
Reputation: 2791
9/11. Today let's remember those men and women whose lives were changed forever.

Peace to all.
 
Old 09-11-2015, 01:40 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,017 posts, read 17,939,286 times
Reputation: 32336
Quote:
Originally Posted by rigizug View Post
9/11. Today let's remember those men and women whose lives were changed forever.

Peace to all.
Thank you for the reminder. Indeed, let's remember those who died, those who were injured, and those whose loved ones died or were injured. Most of us, thank the heavens, were not so directly affected, but I believe something within us was severely injured, namely our sense of security inside of the national boundaries. In none of the four major wars fought by the United States during the 20th century was there any significant attack on our homeland (World War I, World War II, Korea, Vietnam). But then that changed dramatically on 9/11.

Three such "traumatic" events shattered my own personal mental world view: The assassination of President Kennedy (1963), the Watts riots (1965) and then the 9/11 attacks. In each case, it was sort of like the end of innocence. It was the disbelief born of "that's not how things are done in this country" face to face with the reality that things were uglier than our daily lives and daily experiences had led us to believe.
 
Old 09-11-2015, 05:33 PM
 
Location: University City, Philadelphia
22,607 posts, read 12,484,853 times
Reputation: 15595
I remember 9/11/01 ... I was living in northwestern New Jersey (just before I moved to Philly) and I had the day off. It was an uncommonly beautiful day. Gorgeous really ... warm but not too warm .... a cloudless brilliant blue sky day with the gentlest of a breeze. One of those days you would describe as one of the 'loveliest days of the year'.

I was living in a gated garden apartment complex than consisted of more than dozen low rise 2 and 3 story apartment buildings and two 10 story mid rise buildings. We had a club house and a swimming pool. The spacious grounds were impeccably maintained and the landscaping was very nice; there were even clusters of tall mature trees. Many a dusk I would see a herd of Virginia white tail deer roaming around. This was about 70 miles west of New York City.

Across the street was another much smaller garden apartment complex, not quite as nice as ours, but well maintained and entirely two story buildings with terraces. An elderly woman lived there I barely knew named Hilda. In the wee hours before the dawn she was packing her suitcase to visit her daughter in California. Early that morning Hilda boarded a flight that did not take her to California. It ended up crashed in a lonely meadow near Shanksville, Pennsylvania.

Last edited by Clark Park; 09-11-2015 at 05:41 PM..
 
Old 09-11-2015, 11:12 PM
 
Location: Verde Valley AZ
8,766 posts, read 9,841,864 times
Reputation: 11350
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Thank you for the reminder. Indeed, let's remember those who died, those who were injured, and those whose loved ones died or were injured. Most of us, thank the heavens, were not so directly affected, but I believe something within us was severely injured, namely our sense of security inside of the national boundaries. In none of the four major wars fought by the United States during the 20th century was there any significant attack on our homeland (World War I, World War II, Korea, Vietnam). But then that changed dramatically on 9/11.

Three such "traumatic" events shattered my own personal mental world view: The assassination of President Kennedy (1963), the Watts riots (1965) and then the 9/11 attacks. In each case, it was sort of like the end of innocence. It was the disbelief born of "that's not how things are done in this country" face to face with the reality that things were uglier than our daily lives and daily experiences had led us to believe.
Tonight, on MSNBC, they had a documentary 9/11:As It Happened. It was on for two hours and I watched the entire thing. I know I saw all those images when it happened but this time I saw things I didn't see before. I think I was so in shock a lot didn't sink in or something. Seeing the Manhattan skyline, after the Towers fell and the totally surreal look of it with all those clouds of smoke, debris and ash...still shocking and how terrifying for the people who lived it. It was a good documentary and I'm glad I watched it.

I wasn't "directly affected, no, but I had a few friends who were. They lost a relative or friend. One of my online friends, that I've known for many years, has written about having walk to 15 miles to get home that day. Another woman had a niece that had just gone to work in one of the Towers and she died. There were a few more. And my friend who was a major in the Air Force was attending a class across from the Pentagon and the entire class saw the plane go down and into the building. I can't imagine.

I share those same three "traumatic events" with you. I was young, had just turned 21 when JFK as assassinated and still nave as to 'the ways of the world'. And firmly believed that things like that didn't happen here. Total shock when they did.
 
Old 09-12-2015, 09:02 AM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,774,833 times
Reputation: 29102
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZDesertBrat View Post
Tonight, on MSNBC, they had a documentary 9/11:As It Happened. It was on for two hours and I watched the entire thing. I know I saw all those images when it happened but this time I saw things I didn't see before. I think I was so in shock a lot didn't sink in or something. Seeing the Manhattan skyline, after the Towers fell and the totally surreal look of it with all those clouds of smoke, debris and ash...still shocking and how terrifying for the people who lived it. It was a good documentary and I'm glad I watched it.

I wasn't "directly affected, no, but I had a few friends who were. They lost a relative or friend. One of my online friends, that I've known for many years, has written about having walk to 15 miles to get home that day. Another woman had a niece that had just gone to work in one of the Towers and she died. There were a few more. And my friend who was a major in the Air Force was attending a class across from the Pentagon and the entire class saw the plane go down and into the building. I can't imagine.
That was a day I called in to work and said I wasn't coming in. My oldest son and is wife lived in CT and both worked in NYC. I wasn't going to go to work until I knew their status. She normally got off the subway at the twin towers but had an errand that morning that caused her to get off one station further so she barely missed the tower collapses. I was getting ready for work and had the TV on to listen to the news so I rushed into the living room and watched all but the first hit live. I immediately stated trying to call my son and daughter-in-law but the circuits were always busy. I kept trying until about 4:00 p.m. when my son was able to get through and tell us the two of them were fine.

My former office in the Pentagon (Army Captain) was "ground-zero" of that plane hit. For me that was somewhat surreal. It hit too close to home.
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