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Old 09-12-2011, 12:25 PM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,479,691 times
Reputation: 29071

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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Is that a cliff in view of your house/garden??? It's gorgeous! Looks like an Indian cave? I remember taking my kids when little to some cave south of Columbia Missouri. It was amazing, really lets you experience the power of nature--the original artist.

P.S. Love your house! Just my D-ex's style Is that you sitting on the porch whittling a stick?
That first post repeated the bluff picture on me so I deleted it. The one above is the right one.

The cliff with what might be a cave - we'll explore further since there are over 6,000 caves/caverns here - is about 15 or so miles from home down a dirt road which we still have a lot of. Same with the stream crossing in the next photo.

The cabin is maybe 2 miles down the country road we live just off of. It's paved.

What I really like are the layers of granite or marble in the bluff. We have both here, some of which is in the Washington Monument.
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Old 09-13-2011, 06:23 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,973,893 times
Reputation: 15649
Rescuing Horses post-retirement, age 61

"Hutchinson said she never planned to run a rescue operation. A former criminal defense attorney, she relocated to the St. Louis area from California after she married in 2005, and she is as surprised as anyone to be wearing mud boots and overalls instead of high heels and a power suit."

Read more: Equine
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Old 09-13-2011, 04:50 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,973,893 times
Reputation: 15649
Default Singing After Retirement

I may try out for the Young at Heart Chorus next year--though I'm not noted for my singing. Did anyone see the movie "Young at Heart"?

They have traveled all over the U.S. including LA, and around the world.


Young@Heart - Stayin' Alive - YouTube

Come As You Are
Young @ Heart Chorus:"Come as you are" - YouTube

My favorite clip - performing at the Jail...
Young @ Heart "Dancing in the Dark" - YouTube

Has anyone taken singing lessons after retirement?
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Old 10-01-2011, 02:24 PM
 
2,740 posts, read 723,538 times
Reputation: 7074
The photos are exquisite.

I find this 74 yo body builder inspiring and life affirming (she started at 56):


74 Year Old Female Body Builder - YouTube
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Old 10-01-2011, 03:13 PM
 
Location: California Mountains
1,448 posts, read 2,588,017 times
Reputation: 2334
"At 47, the 5-foot-5-inch-tall Winifred Pristell was dangerously obese, weighing 235 pounds -- a body mass index of about 40. A body mass index of 25 is considered overweight; obesity starts at 30.

One day while taking a bath, Pristell remembers feeling as though she was dying. She asked daughter, Cynthia, if she would walk with her.

"I couldn't walk but a block that first time," she said.

Every morning the two walked together, a little farther each day. Within a year, Pristell was up to three miles, five days a week, she said.

That's about the point she walked into a gym for the first time in her life. She tried aerobic exercises, stationary bikes, and other machines and contraptions.

Years would pass before she tried free weights and more than a decade before she began lifting weights competitively at the age of 60.

At 68, Pristell set world records for her age in bench press, 176.2 pounds, and in dead lift, 270 pounds.

She has arthritis in her hands, feet and back. Her fingers are stiff and gnarled and she can't make a fist with her left hand. One of her doctors recommended against continuing strength training. She's not willing to give it up just yet.

"We are all dealing with something. If you let whatever you're dealing with control your life, you have no quality of life," she said." -- (Excerpt from David Chircop of Herald Everett, WA)



Winifred Pristell turns 72 at the end of this year.

This video was taped in 2006:


HEAVY METAL - YouTube
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Old 10-01-2011, 03:15 PM
 
Location: California Mountains
1,448 posts, read 2,588,017 times
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A very good video and interview of Winifred Pristell in this two-year-old article:

winifred pristell : The Low Density Lifestyle
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Old 10-01-2011, 03:51 PM
Status: "Support the Mining Law of 1872" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,576 posts, read 10,920,803 times
Reputation: 19200
I'm far more impressed by Milton Friedman who was involved in active intellectual activities until he was in his nineties. He far surpassed any athlete who ever lived.

Milton Friedman - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 10-01-2011, 07:45 PM
 
Location: Arizona
419 posts, read 657,930 times
Reputation: 862
Default Meeting Gladys

A few days ago I attended my condo association's annual picnic & meeting held at the community pool. We are a condo community of 43 units and until this meeting I had not met the neighbors living on the adjoining street. I usually do not like these type of events but everyone was very friendly. So glad that I attended.

Soon after arriving, I had the pleasure to meet Gladys. She was dressed in jeans, a casual shirt & sandals. Gladys had just celebrated her 100th birthday. She lives alone with her 2 cats, does her own household chores & still drives (sorry NEG). While she arrived with close neighbors, she took a liking to me and we spent considerable time sitting together. She was happy & vivacious and paid particular interest to the financial statements of the association that were passed out. One neighbor assisted her with the numbers but she didn't seem to need his help.

I loved talking to this lovely lady about her cats and the fact that she has too much stuff but avoids taking her daughter's offer to help her sort through and get rid of her beloved stuff.

I do not know the story of this lady's life journey but her very demeanor would suggest a life well lived. We warmly hugged each other as the evening came to a close promising to see each other again soon.

I never knew a Centurian outside of a nursing home environment. Gladys may have never accomplished anything that would be considered noteworthy except for being a warm & caring person. To me, that is really all there is.
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Old 10-01-2011, 08:14 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,973,893 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by SCBaker View Post
A few days ago I attended my condo association's annual picnic & meeting held at the community pool. We are a condo community of 43 units and until this meeting I had not met the neighbors living on the adjoining street. I usually do not like these type of events but everyone was very friendly. So glad that I attended.

Soon after arriving, I had the pleasure to meet Gladys. She was dressed in jeans, a casual shirt & sandals. Gladys had just celebrated her 100th birthday. She lives alone with her 2 cats, does her own household chores & still drives (sorry NEG). While she arrived with close neighbors, she took a liking to me and we spent considerable time sitting together. She was happy & vivacious and paid particular interest to the financial statements of the association that were passed out. One neighbor assisted her with the numbers but she didn't seem to need his help.

I loved talking to this lovely lady about her cats and the fact that she has too much stuff but avoids taking her daughter's offer to help her sort through and get rid of her beloved stuff.

I do not know the story of this lady's life journey but her very demeanor would suggest a life well lived. We warmly hugged each other as the evening came to a close promising to see each other again soon.

I never knew a Centurian outside of a nursing home environment. Gladys may have never accomplished anything that would be considered noteworthy except for being a warm & caring person. To me, that is really all there is.
Lovely story! I don't think we have to accomplish anything big in life--what your new friend accomplished is all there is, a life well-lived. I helped three women in their eighties put together their memoirs--book-length, impressive writing, and we had them made into bound books. One (who died recently) was a farm wife/worker, one is a well to do woman (wife of an antique dealer whose whole life was being a mother and homemaker), and the other a wife/homemaker whose husband was an air force pilot. None had led "remarkable lives" in terms of fame and achievement, but these ladies are remarkable because of their grace and resilience and making an impact on their families and communities....and all with inner happiness despite life tragedies. Their books are amazing. Your friend Gladys sounds like "one of them."
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Old 10-02-2011, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Arizona
419 posts, read 657,930 times
Reputation: 862
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Lovely story! I don't think we have to accomplish anything big in life--what your new friend accomplished is all there is, a life well-lived. I helped three women in their eighties put together their memoirs--book-length, impressive writing, and we had them made into bound books. One (who died recently) was a farm wife/worker, one is a well to do woman (wife of an antique dealer whose whole life was being a mother and homemaker), and the other a wife/homemaker whose husband was an air force pilot. None had led "remarkable lives" in terms of fame and achievement, but these ladies are remarkable because of their grace and resilience and making an impact on their families and communities....and all with inner happiness despite life tragedies. Their books are amazing. Your friend Gladys sounds like "one of them."
I think it is fantastic that you spent so much time with these ladies helping them to put together their memory books. A win-win situation. I can tell that you were happy to hear their stories and they were probably thrilled that someone thought they were important enough to have something worthwhile to tell and record.

While growing up, I lived in a neighborhood filled with European immigrants. In my early twenties, I rented an upstairs flat from an older Belgian woman. She liked for me to sit on the front porch in the evenings with her. She told me as a young girl she and her siblings ran through fields to escape German soldiers during WW1. I just wish I had been more mature and had shown more interest in hearing all of the stories she was so eager to tell.

When I was a child, my dad bought all of his gas at Johnny's Mobil station. I followed suit when I turned 16 and began to drive. Johnny was a jolly man and would always tease me about my buying habits. If I was paying, I would ask him to give me 50 cents worth of gas. If by chance I had my dad's credit card then I would ask him to fill it up. Unfotunately, Johnny stayed too long in the neighborhood after it became crime & drug infested. He was robbed & murdered at his station in 1982.

My former MIL had three Jewish lady friends. I thought it was strange that they always wore long sleeved blouses even in the summer time. I learned later that they were holocaust survivers and always kept their arms covered because they were embarrased by the ID number that had been branded into their arms.

Most of these immigrants are now gone taking their stories with them. What a wealth of information to be had if only people had taken the time to listen.

I suspect there are millions of retirees quietly working behind the scenes to make life a little easier for the less fortunate and for those in need. Typically, they do not receive much recognition and do not expect it. Their rewards are the satisfaction of knowing that they are giving back to society. These people are truly an inspiration.
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