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Old 03-28-2015, 07:53 AM
 
Location: Tucson
446 posts, read 571,123 times
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I have been selling my books on Amazon as a first step. I have a ton of mint condition art books, some no longer in print which has increased their value. it is a start anyway. I only live in 900 square feet but you still amass a lot of "stuff". Getting ready to move and it feels great to let go of things.
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Old 03-28-2015, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,969,510 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
Good for you. Too many people become obsessed with disposing of beautiful things and beautiful memories.
Memories live in the heart, not on the shelf. A few beautiful things can suffice for many of us who contemplate having to give up stuff in view of advancing age/a move.
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Old 03-28-2015, 10:46 PM
Status: "I am Blessed." (set 4 days ago)
 
Location: Spurs country. "Go, Spurs, Go!"
3,402 posts, read 3,963,274 times
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I have an "attachment" personality, meaning things have meaning to me and it is hard to part with memories. I have downsized twice, the first in 2003, when I moved to Texas from Michigan and having lived in the same house, a tri-level with a finished basement, 2 1/2 car garage and large pole barn on 12 acres, for 27 years. Even with having only 1 child there was still alot of pictures and "memories" saved from babyhood to adulthood. We lived in the country on a main road way up on a hill. While the house was for sale, I sorted and had an ongoing garage sale for weeks, putting out new items daily. I put the sign (similiar to a "For Sale" sign) at the end of the driveway facing both directions so it would be viewed by folks driving to and from work, and put a sheet over it when nobody was home. I would have it uncovered every night so folks returning home from work could drive up whenever they could. I finished with a big, advertised sale when the house was sold (done by me). All furniture was sold, took only boxed items.

When I moved back to Michigan in 2012 (I lasted less than 5 months, I learned the old adage is true in my case, "you can't go back"), I had an estate sale (paid a company), which included unpacking boxes I had never unpacked when I moved from there in 2003! Again, (almost) all furniture was sold, took only a few things I couldn't replace, rest was boxed items. Those boxed items get ya every time!

I bought a smaller home that fits me perfectly as a single woman, and my mantra is "If I don't absolutely LOVE it, if I'm not going to use it or display it, it is NOT coming into my house." I really don't miss anything I got rid of, in fact, if I had any doubts about getting rid of it, I kept it, and as I unpack boxes of "decor", I am finding I really don't have a place for some things, or I don't have the room, or I am "not in love with it" anymore. Also, if I got rid of it, I am NOT buying it again.

I still love going to yard sales, thrift stores and estate sales. However, I am discovering that just about EVERYTHING available is what I got rid of myself! I am not kidding, I sometimes feel I am at my own sale again.

I hope some of my story helps some of you having trouble getting started or finishing. I like not having the weight of a lifetime of "stuff" around me.
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Old 03-30-2015, 10:39 AM
 
174 posts, read 187,694 times
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Yes, I agree with Newenglandgirl. We are in the process of downsizing and want to move south to a warmer climate. I was raised in the 50s by Depression Era parents. Two things were instilled in me: you never threw anything out and if it was broken, you'd tape it or glue it or figure out how to fix it. You could never be wasteful. That was a sin. Being a senior now, I realize that I sometimes still have the mindset of a person living during the depression. It's paralyzing to say the least. I have packed up dozens of boxes over the years with clothing and household goods and I don't miss any of it. I have a big house to empty, but am confident that we'll get through it, one room at a time. I know that my spouse and my grown children are the most important thing to me, and NOT my stuff. I don't like the burden of holding on to my possessions and I certainly don't want my kids to have to be burdened by all of our belongings. MichiganTransplant is right, I too, "will like not having the weight of a lifetime of "stuff" around me. This forum is helping me to move on. Thanks to all.
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Old 03-30-2015, 07:00 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,969,510 times
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It's most hard to give up things of memory, but it's also hard to give up things of value.

Today, for instance, I took two very expensive sherpa dog coats to an animal shelter because my two dogs refuse to wear dog coats (they think coats are for sissies). Things like that, which we believe will someday be useful and would cost so much to replace, can keep us in a state of denial.

I have several friends who keep in their attics their grown children's baby items like cribs, even though they are not going to use them for grandkids (these items would be outlawed nowadays as unsafe, lol). I refuse to give up a small but unneeded collection of fine cast iron pots (including iron muffin and corn pone bakeware; if I dropped one on my foot I'd be SOL). I have a nephew who inherited his grandfather's entire collection of opera 78 records, and he won't give them up though he has no record player.

When looking around to downsize, I ask myself if I'm in denial. If I admit yes, then out it goes.
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Old 03-30-2015, 10:14 PM
 
9,678 posts, read 15,855,639 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
It just occurred to me that a lot of boomers are still affected by our parents' mentality acquired from the Great Depression, to save everything in case scarcity returns and/or prices of things skyrocket. She saved linens like they were going out of style, and I inherited this thing of hoarding linens (sheets, blankets, towels). I'm not so bad with other things, but if you run out of TP you can come to my house.

I grew up with that Depression-era mentality, too, and it was doubly so, since my grandparents lived with us! Waste not, want not, I heard throughout my childhood.

That was a different era, and frugality had a different meaning. Hold onto your stuff, you might not be able to replace it. However, nowadays, hoarding stuff can be an act of wastefulness. People back in our parents and grandparents generations didn't move around so much, and didn't need to tote their stuff around. It was ok to store it in the garage, attic, etc, it could be of use again someday, or it would be passed down to the next generation. Seldom did people move, at least not like we do now.

The cost of storing and moving and shipping today cancels out any gain you might get from hanging onto old stuff you might use someday. We are doing a cross-town move, and have already figured out its cheaoer to buy new, everyday dishes, utensils, etc, than to buy boxes, wrapping paper, bubble wrap, storage boxes, rent truck, rent movers with brawn. My DH, the engineer, is trying to come up with an algorithim as to how much it cost t move a cubic inch a certain weight. This should be interesting!

Would be nice to have a nice formulas to have to know how much this item is costing to to move, Of course, it wouldn't be spot on, but it could be an eye-opener .That Grandfather clock that
sat in in Great Marys LR for generations might just not be the thing to tote halfcross the country to take up residence ii our new abode.


so, WTD with large, awkward pieced that are simply too heavy, awkward, expensive to move. Perhaps you could donate them to a small museum, display area, vintage restaurant, or perhaps donate to a thrift store, others enjoy them and you don't have the hassle and expense to hau hem around.


just to state---hanging onto items that have no current value is actually a form of financial irresponsibility. Eventuality that stuff ha to go somewhere, ad its all dumped on the last guy in line!
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Old 03-31-2015, 06:20 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,969,510 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryleeII View Post
just to state---hanging onto items that have no current value is actually a form of financial irresponsibility. Eventuality that stuff ha to go somewhere, ad its all dumped on the last guy in line!
Unfortunately, what doesn't go into reuse goes into dumps/landfill, adding to the burden on our planet.
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Old 03-31-2015, 11:59 AM
 
174 posts, read 187,694 times
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What an interesting idea Marylee, to have a formula for cost of moving. The best I can come up with from 2 people that recently moved from CT to North and South Carolina. They said it's about $1000 for every 2000 pounds. So if you have a 4 bedroom home at about 12,000-14,000 lbs., it would cost $6000. to $7,000 to go about 700 miles. Have NO idea of the real cost. This is just an estimate from people who moved, but I don't know what other services they required. It would be interesting to know the price "per pound" to move 500 miles or 1000 miles. Knowing this estimated figure would help one decide if it is worth bringing that 2 pound cookbook with you or to leave it behind! Like the idea of a somewhat workable formula.
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Old 03-31-2015, 02:50 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,969,510 times
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When we moved halfway cross the country 25 years ago with kids in tow, we rented the largest U-haul truck we could get and DH drove the truck and, following behind, I drove the car with the kids. It really wasn't all that hard to do, once everything was loaded. It saved a ton of money and it made us really have to decide what to bring with us and what not to. The only downside is that we got separated in Wheeling, WV. After we pulled out of a rest stop I followed the wrong U-haul and only figured it out many miles later when someone stuck an elbow out the window and it wasn't a man's. We didn't have mobile phones. How our two vehicles ever got reunited I don't know, I'll have to ask him.
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Old 04-01-2015, 02:01 PM
 
1,567 posts, read 578,952 times
Reputation: 3341
New England Girl --- That is a funny moving story! You can pass that one along to your grandchildren when they get bigger. So did you find out how you two caught up with each other?
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