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Old 09-21-2011, 12:01 PM
 
Location: Sequim, WA
786 posts, read 1,907,721 times
Reputation: 888

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As a federal retiree...there was no way I could go back to work for the federal government without losing retiree benefits...not that I would want to go back to work for the feds anyway! Personally, I think that's the way it should be. I don't see how the states can afford to allow retirees to double dip. Plus...in my opinion, I would like to see people (who can afford it) retire if possible so that more of these out of work young folks could get jobs. My son (mid 20s) is fortunate to have a decent job, but he has friends he graduated from college who simply cannot find a job these days. Just as the economy requires money to "flow," society needs for jobs to "flow" as people retire...workers move up the chain, and new bodies enter the workforce.
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Old 09-21-2011, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,744,100 times
Reputation: 32309
Default Calif. teachers' ret. is a totally separate system from other state employees.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
California has had a "Retired Annuitant (Irritant)" program for state employees for years - retire one day and start drawing your pension and come back the next day back on the payroll for up to nine months out of the year. A "lovely" way to double-dip. I believe it's being phased-out, as well it should be.
California teachers can also "double dip", but only to the extent of $31,020 per year, which works out to about 50% time more or less, depending on what the salaries are in a given school district (and these vary considerably). So their earnings limitation is expressed in dollars rather than in months. This limitation applies to teaching in the public school system in California only; teaching in private schools, working in private industry, and teaching in another state or country are not subject to the earnings limitation. This is certainly generous to the retired teachers. Should the limit be somewhat lower? In my opinion, yes. But I see nothing wrong with them doing a bit of substitute teaching without incurring a penalty. Boy, a teacher could make out like a bandit by retiring in Calif., then moving to another state and teaching full-time!
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Old 09-21-2011, 05:52 PM
 
18 posts, read 20,314 times
Reputation: 29
I couldn't wait to retire from a high-stress job at 60. A colleague died of a heart attack before he could retire. Another colleague didn't want to retire until he had a heart attack and coronary bypass surgery; he died a few years later.

Another colleague didn't want to retire. He had a nightmare about retiring. Then he had a change of heart, and one day I saw him clicking his heels at the prospect of his coming retirement.

The heel clicker and I are both still around, and I've never once regretted having retired when I did.
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Old 09-21-2011, 06:22 PM
 
Location: Baltimore
1,802 posts, read 7,299,478 times
Reputation: 1914
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrgoodwx View Post
As a federal retiree...there was no way I could go back to work for the federal government without losing retiree benefits...not that I would want to go back to work for the feds anyway! Personally, I think that's the way it should be. I don't see how the states can afford to allow retirees to double dip. Plus...in my opinion, I would like to see people (who can afford it) retire if possible so that more of these out of work young folks could get jobs. My son (mid 20s) is fortunate to have a decent job, but he has friends he graduated from college who simply cannot find a job these days. Just as the economy requires money to "flow," society needs for jobs to "flow" as people retire...workers move up the chain, and new bodies enter the workforce.
I'm a state government retiree, and I never had any thoughts of going back to work after I retired 2 1/2 years ago. But I had accumulated a lot of specialized knowledge over my 30+ years of service, and they kept asking me to consider coming back part time as a consultant. After being retired a little over a year I agreed to try it. I have to say that I have found the best of both worlds. I work when I want and on the projects that I want, and I usually work from home. There is a certain satisfaction in knowing that my advice is both sought and respected.

There is a maximum amount that I may earn before it affects my pension, and I make sure that I do not exceed that maximum. In truth, my income is not that much lower than it was when I was working full time in a high stress position, and I work 20 to 24 hours a week without any of the headaches or responsibililty that I had before. I am (only?) 56 years old, and can see myself continuing this way for several more years. My boss recently told me I have a job as long as I want one. Life is good.
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Old 09-21-2011, 07:48 PM
 
Location: Sequim, WA
786 posts, read 1,907,721 times
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janetvj...It sounds like your contributions are needed. Some years ago, there was some kind of initiative discussed in the federal government in which employees could "ease into retirement." The idea was to let them go to part-time and help train new-comers so that their expertise was not lost. I don't know whatever happened to that initiative...I guess it fell in the same hole that a lot of ideas fall into.
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Old 09-21-2011, 08:36 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,691 posts, read 33,700,331 times
Reputation: 51915
I was so excited (new adventure, new location) when I got closer and closer to retirement that it couldn't come fast enough. It wasn't that I disliked my job, I was just gung-ho for something totally different in my life. I liked the sweeping change. Besides leaving the job and the move to a new state, getting rid of most of my things, too, before I moved (about 6 weeks after I retired). It was like I was cleaning out my old life.

Leading up to my retirement I very much enjoyed the retirement and relocation research. I liked the exploration year after I moved, too. Everything was new and fascinating and worthy of exploration. I had made two other state moves in my life but because of the job, never had the time or put in the effort to really get to know my new locations.

Never thought about my last job (worked for the same employer for 34 years in different jobs) after I walked out the door.

I don't know if I would have felt the same exhiliration of retirement if I was going to retire in place.
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Old 09-21-2011, 09:10 PM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,492,863 times
Reputation: 29076
Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
I was so excited (new adventure, new location) when I got closer and closer to retirement that it couldn't come fast enough. It wasn't that I disliked my job, I was just gung-ho for something totally different in my life. I liked the sweeping change. Besides leaving the job and the move to a new state, getting rid of most of my things, too, before I moved (about 6 weeks after I retired). It was like I was cleaning out my old life.

Leading up to my retirement I very much enjoyed the retirement and relocation research. I liked the exploration year after I moved, too. Everything was new and fascinating and worthy of exploration. I had made two other state moves in my life but because of the job, never had the time or put in the effort to really get to know my new locations.

Never thought about my last job (worked for the same employer for 34 years in different jobs) after I walked out the door.

I don't know if I would have felt the same exhiliration of retirement if I was going to retire in place.
We looked upon our 2,000 mile relocation as a grand adventure; and so it remains.
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Old 09-21-2011, 09:37 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,955,483 times
Reputation: 18050
Doubt has to whetehr i wanted to retire no. Some apprehension of if I plan well;alittle. 11 years later ;no doubt .
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Old 09-27-2011, 10:58 AM
 
Location: Central Florida
103 posts, read 195,644 times
Reputation: 65
Yesterday I turned my paper work in to retire after 32 years in law enforcement at the age of 54 . I have dreamed of this day as my job has never defined who I am it has always been just a job. Now that it is here I can't sleep and am undergoing unexpected stress. I know I'm not going to miss the job but I will miss the people and the interaction. I worry about the future especially in this economy but with my kids grown and moved away I want to relocate to Florida and I know that with the housing market where it is now is the time to act. My pension is 75 % of my salary and I have some money saved and investments but due to a divorce and starting over I am still saddled with a mortgage and the usual necessary bills. I will have to work, preferrably, part time as I have not paid into for S.S.the necessary quarters. Staying would increase my pension slightly but not dramatically. I also fear that due to some physical problems I can not hold up to the physical demands of the job much longer. I am struggling with whether I am making the right choice. I'm afraid if I don't do it now and make the jump now I'll miss my window of opportunity and will never move but I worry whether I'll be able to make it financially and don't want to be forced back into a full time job starting over.

Last edited by CouchTater; 09-27-2011 at 11:11 AM.. Reason: typos
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Old 09-27-2011, 11:49 AM
 
2,737 posts, read 3,271,057 times
Reputation: 4101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sagitarrius48 View Post
This is my last year teaching, and I know I am OVER IT, but I still find myself "teary-eyed" at times knowing whatever I do this year, it will be the last time. I cried when I picked up my room keys, I welled up at Open House when I explained to a set of parents that this was my last one (but then, too, I am not sure if it was due to a parent asking if I taught at another high school in '85, only to discover she had been one of my students! ). And as we ending reading The Crucible in my last period class on Friday, tears began to fall as I realized I would never be teaching it again.

SO is this normal? I know I am ready mentally, but at times like these, I begin to wonder if I really should be leaving!
If all falls in line, I'm about 7 years away from retirement. I cringe at the thought of writing down the words "Assumed the shift" that one final time in the control room log. I frequently reminisce of past experiences, incidents, emergencies, and those comical moments which occur in any line of work. My co-workers, no matter how liked or otherwise, have been permanently stamped in my mind. I assume it's nothing more than a matter of adjustment.
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