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Old 09-26-2011, 07:13 AM
 
182 posts, read 206,646 times
Reputation: 288
Should of kept my Apple stock and bought more Aol and sold before it tanked.
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Old 09-26-2011, 04:25 PM
 
Location: East Sacramento
1,004 posts, read 1,178,426 times
Reputation: 501
Im not fully retired, but close.
If you stay in your home, make sure its EXACTLY where you want to be. Once you retire, you pretty much lose the ability to buy a place.
My neighborhood is changing rapidly and we are not happy with it.
If you're thinking about that cabin in the mountains, beg borrow and steal a way to get it! Or that beach condo.
Do it now, its a lot harder later!!!
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Old 09-27-2011, 07:26 PM
 
703 posts, read 828,513 times
Reputation: 746
The one thing I wish we had done differently 30 years ago when my parents retired was insist that they tell us what their plan was for the future and how much help they were expecting from us. I made several half-hearted attempts and was told to mind my own business.

Two years into retirement, my father had health issues. They needed help and have continued to need help ever since. For the past twenty-eight years, we have spent no end of time, energy, and funds helping them out. I retired early to care for my Mom, passing up several years' salary and increased SS and pension benefits. My husband and I are both retired now and instead of traveling and sleeping in, I'm caring full-time for my Mom who doesn't know up from down.

I would encourage everyone to discuss with their parents what their plans are for dealing with issues of aging. Do they have long-term care insurance? Are they planning to move into a retirement community when they can no longer handle home maintenance and yard work? Where will they live when they can no longer manage meals and medications?

I love my parents, but their lack of planning had a significant impact on our lives, finances, and retirement. With people living decades longer than they used to...
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Old 09-27-2011, 08:02 PM
 
Location: Boca Raton, FL
3,983 posts, read 4,858,420 times
Reputation: 3477
Smile I love your last sentence....

Quote:
Originally Posted by PatRoy1 View Post
I am now growing old with my best friend. That's the best part.


I love that last part. My family didn't take many vacations so I didn't grow up that way. My husband's parents took the 2 weeks each year - many memories. I would change that and would have taken more vacations with my children.

We were just out in Calif for a family wedding and my daughter commented on how nice it was that we were together for 3 (almost 4) days! Loved that comment from her.
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Old 09-28-2011, 10:17 AM
 
703 posts, read 828,513 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bette View Post
[/b]

My family didn't take many vacations so I didn't grow up that way. My husband's parents took the 2 weeks each year - many memories. I would change that and would have taken more vacations with my children.

We were just out in Calif for a family wedding and my daughter commented on how nice it was that we were together for 3 (almost 4) days! Loved that comment from her.
Isn't it sweet when the grown kids say how much they love being the family.

I was thinking about our long car trips down the AlCan and cross country. The kids fussed and carried on for the first day or so, then they settled in and had such a good time. Played games with one another, traded books, snuggled in together to sleep.

Tom recalled the time he was driving through a whiteout blizzard across Montana while the kids and I sang Walking in a Winter Wonderland.

Years ago there was a story in Readers Digest --The Day We Flew Kites. The Day We Flew Kites

Reminds me of how important it is to every once in awhile give the day to day responsibilities and just enjoy being with each other.
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Old 09-30-2011, 01:00 PM
 
760 posts, read 701,094 times
Reputation: 724
I always had a strong work ethic and worked long and hard at my job. Even so I was fired once and lost my job several times due to downsizing and mergers. I did not learn but continued to work hard. No way would I do that again. I would not spend 99% of my energy looking out for my employer's interests but would instead spend more on my own interests and enjoyment of life. More relaxation, exercise and healthy living and less work.
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Old 09-30-2011, 03:28 PM
 
Location: Hills & Hollers of the Aux Arcs
18,722 posts, read 15,340,744 times
Reputation: 16538
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
I always had a strong work ethic and worked long and hard at my job. Even so I was fired once and lost my job several times due to downsizing and mergers. I did not learn but continued to work hard. No way would I do that again. I would not spend 99% of my energy looking out for my employer's interests but would instead spend more on my own interests and enjoyment of life. More relaxation, exercise and healthy living and less work.
Now yer talkin'! Took a divorce to make me see the light but it sure made my last dozen working yeasrs more enjoyable and less stressful. Life bumped work in the priority column!
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Old 09-30-2011, 11:43 PM
GLS
 
1,990 posts, read 3,371,371 times
Reputation: 2320
I would have enjoyed "today" more. Planning is fine, but I spent too much time worrying about "tomorrow".
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Old 10-01-2011, 08:12 AM
 
4,348 posts, read 3,363,249 times
Reputation: 11695
O.K. now for my advice which may be very different than some of what you have heard.

Get yourself into a good career. Not only one that pays well, but one that you enjoy. I consider myself fortunate that most Monday mornings, I'm eager to get to my office and get started. Many people (including my wife) dread Monday morning and wish the weekend lasted forever. I don't like the idea of people being in debt 100K to go to school and the advice about going to a state school is good advice. However, in my mind there are three things that justify going into debt: education; a home; and a car purchase.

Don't expect to retire at age 60, or start with the notion that you have a "right" to do so. If you get to sixty and are able to financially afford to retire, than great. However, the reality is that as human life expectancy increases people are probably going to have to work longer. Its the only way that society can sustain itself. This makes it all the more critical that you choose a job and career path that will enable you to work until you are old. For example, being a sheet metal worker might pay very well. However, you'll find damn few sheet metal workers on the job at age 60 or beyond. The work is just too physically demanding and injuries become more commonplace as one ages.

Don't count on living to retirement age. Whether that age is 62, 65, or 70 many people die before retirement age comes. We still have many premature deaths in this country from heart attacks, strokes, and cancer. Don't take every spare penny you've got and put it towards retirement. What happens if you don't make it that far in life? You've died without have many of the things that make life enjoyable occur. Man does live by bread alone. Spend some of your money on things that make you happy whether these be new clothes, a good stereo system, or vacations.

Have a retirement plan. Start young and contribute whatever you can afford. Whether it be a pension from a government, an IRA, a 401K, or whatever. Make regular contributions and don't take anything out.

Realize that even if you do survive to your senior years, you may not be physically in shape to enjoy B]things that you now take for granted. [/b] I've had the sad experience of traveling abroad and running into Americans who waited too long to travel. Many look haggard, worn out, and sick. I don't believe in that condition that they could enjoy a trip very much.

Take care of your family. I know that retirement for me will be a downright bad experience if I feel I neglected my children. Not everyone can afford to send their children to college. I count myself fortunate that--at least, right now--I can. However, I think everyone can provide the children some assistance in going to school or at least learning a trade. Another form of neglect is spending all your time in work-related pursuits and never having time to be with your kids whether it be doing chores around the house or going on a vacation together. Don't be in a position where your kids grow up where you feel you barely had a relationship with them.

Develop hobbies and past-times that you and your spouse can enjoy after your kids have grown up. The day will come when the kids leave home and you don't want to be staring across the dinner table at your spouse wondering what to say because you were so busy that you never developed a relationship outside of raising your children. I admit this is an area that I need to work on myself. My focus so far has been work and family.

Take the advice of the old Kenny Rogers song "The Gambler" about life.

"You have to know when to hold up,

Know when to fold up,

Know when to walk away,

Know when to run,

You never count your money while you're sitting at the table,

There'll be time enough for counting, when the dealings done"

and finally he says "that the best you can hope for is to die in your sleep"
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Old 10-01-2011, 12:39 PM
 
703 posts, read 828,513 times
Reputation: 746
Great advice.

Is Kenny Rogers the one who sang about how one should "never gamble more than you can stand to lose?"
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