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Old 10-05-2011, 06:57 AM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,746 posts, read 4,226,506 times
Reputation: 6866

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Quote:
Originally Posted by accufitgolf View Post
Is automating someone in your life the best for them or for you? I have news for some of you concerning your parents. Ever consider that maybe they do not want to be available to you 24/7?

Ever consider that one thing being retired means is that one is not answerable to anyone any more?
I absolutely agree. I don't believe that seniors are necessarily "resistant to change". The way I see it, there's a finite number of minutes in each day. The older I get, the longer it takes me to learn something new. Does the benefit of learning the new technology outweigh the effort and/or loss of some of those minutes? Sometimes yes, sometimes no. It's all about choices. It is patronizing to describe a senior as "resistant to change" because he or she don't choose to adopt the technology that YOU apparently believe is for his or her own good. Really? Silly children.
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Old 10-05-2011, 07:19 AM
 
Location: Florida
2,291 posts, read 4,954,452 times
Reputation: 5236
My mother is 85, uses her ATM card, has a cell phone that she has trouble using. Computer, yes, I
bought her one 5 years ago, it sits in her spare room and she still does not know how to use it. She
does't want to learn, although she intially wanted one.

My father who died at 84, used his ATM, cell and loved to pound around on the computer.

Me, I have used a PC since 1982, started when I worked for an electronics company. I've had a cell
phone since 1988, weighed a ton and really couldn't do much on it, ATM, yes, basically all I use.

I don't believe that all seniors are resistant to change, some are just afraid to change. Fear of the unknown.
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Old 10-05-2011, 07:39 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,235,178 times
Reputation: 22386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dollydo View Post
My mother is 85, uses her ATM card, has a cell phone that she has trouble using. Computer, yes, I
bought her one 5 years ago, it sits in her spare room and she still does not know how to use it. She
does't want to learn, although she intially wanted one.

My father who died at 84, used his ATM, cell and loved to pound around on the computer.

Me, I have used a PC since 1982, started when I worked for an electronics company. I've had a cell
phone since 1988, weighed a ton and really couldn't do much on it, ATM, yes, basically all I use.

I don't believe that all seniors are resistant to change, some are just afraid to change. Fear of the unknown.


That is exactly what I think is my parents' situation. It may be that they feel overwhelmed and possibly incompetent and for folks who conquered the world in so many ways - from WWII, Korea, to raising families in lean times - it can't be good to face something that makes them feel out of control or seems so very very difficult and/or confusing.
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Old 10-05-2011, 08:17 AM
 
7,342 posts, read 16,666,859 times
Reputation: 4568
Some parents and grandparents need to be warned about the language that can show up on Facebook! While some parents and grandparents could handle it, others can very well say "why on earth did I get an account on this website?". Thing is, some parents and grandparents could see what their adult kids, grandkids and their friends are writing and think OMG to what is being said! Facebook can be a great communication tool, but the language or abbreviations can be shocking!
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Old 10-05-2011, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Bay Area, Calif.
2,435 posts, read 2,849,772 times
Reputation: 2581
Maybe because newness does'nt always mean better. And many things were fine before they were 'improved',
like a couple of the Windows operating systems and more cars than I can mention here.
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Old 10-05-2011, 10:03 AM
 
491 posts, read 599,234 times
Reputation: 2095
Quote:
Originally Posted by lenora View Post
I absolutely agree. I don't believe that seniors are necessarily "resistant to change". The way I see it, there's a finite number of minutes in each day. The older I get, the longer it takes me to learn something new. Does the benefit of learning the new technology outweigh the effort and/or loss of some of those minutes? Sometimes yes, sometimes no. It's all about choices. It is patronizing to describe a senior as "resistant to change" because he or she don't choose to adopt the technology that YOU apparently believe is for his or her own good. Really? Silly children.
I would agree, and add for me the $$ needed to support those things make them not worth it. I do have a cell phone(my only phone) but I really don't need one with internet etc. I wouldn't use it enough to justify cost. Even texting adds up, so I dropped it from my phone. Plus, I am busy enough in real life hands on things to not need any more technology. It really isn't my thing.
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Old 10-05-2011, 12:52 PM
 
29,830 posts, read 34,918,975 times
Reputation: 11752
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Since those of us posting here have to use a computer to do so, we may not be completely representative of seniors, especially of older seniors. I am wondering how many people you know personally who do not have
1. Email
2. A cell phone
3. An ATM card
My mother, who died six years ago at age 90, stubbornly resisted any move in that direction and had none of the three. I currently know three people who do not have email, ages approximately 65, 78, and 90. Except for the 90-year-old, an aunt, I am wondering how unusual this is. Even the homeless could have email and use a public library for access to it.

This is sort of a poll without the actual poll. I didn't set up a poll because I thought the various permutations - what older people don't have and their ages - would be a little too complex to encompass in a poll. Please feel free to expand your answers beyond the three items I listed if you think it makes sense in order to discuss this topic.
I wonder how much of it is about change vs adaptation. As we age and retire do we need to adapt as much? Do all folks even need email, cell phones or ATM cards? Certainly when working and active we need to more often embrace new technology but perhaps as we age our lifestyles may become less changing and not as much need to adapt.
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Old 10-05-2011, 01:02 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,698 posts, read 23,704,584 times
Reputation: 35450
As a left handed person, dial phones drove me crazy. One of us was backwards and I constantly mis-dialed numbers. Hurray for push button phones.
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Old 10-05-2011, 01:21 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 84,044,795 times
Reputation: 18051
My guess is the same has when people can't afford all those things anymore but fail to give them up. its what they are use to and in this case less dependent on.People use to be able to make change at one time too;hard habit to break when people give you the wrong change time and agian if they don't have a register to tell tehm.
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Old 10-05-2011, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,698 posts, read 23,704,584 times
Reputation: 35450
Quote:
Originally Posted by texdav View Post
My guess is the same has when people can't afford all those things anymore but fail to give them up. its what they are use to and in this case less dependent on.People use to be able to make change at one time too;hard habit to break when people give you the wrong change time and agian if they don't have a register to tell tehm.
Very good point! People are shocked when I tell them I gave up my cell phone service. But I really wasn't using it and I figured I could save a few bucks in canceling the service. So far it hasn't been a problem.

I once had a sales lady count back change to me even though her register told her what it was supposed to be. I pointed out to her that she didn't have to do that any longer and she laughed and just said "Old habits die hard."
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