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Old 10-10-2011, 06:54 AM
 
7,341 posts, read 16,660,022 times
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I don't think it's a "generalization", I think it plain and simple the truth and fact. I seen the same thing happen where I use to work at! And, no matter what the cost, they were going to buy it! Just chuck down the old credit card!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
I have noticed a difference of attitude between younger people and older regarding electronic devices. The younger people where I used to work seemed to feel compelled to have the latest and the greastest in technology whatever it may be. They loved to come to work and show off their latest acquisitions.

The older folks I know usually choose what they need and can afford. It isn't such a status thing. Of course this is a generalization.
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Old 10-10-2011, 11:59 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,212,814 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theatergypsy View Post
No, they shouldn't feel left out. Why is it so difficult to pick up the phone and call Grandma and Grandpa? Or stick a few pictures in an envelope with a little note and (oh, God!) mail them to Grandma and Grandpa. Is it such an inconvenience to cater to the people who made your life on this planet possible?

Because your choice is email and texting, why is it necessary to insist that G and G learn? And if daytime calls at work are interruptive, why not let G and G know that and offer to chat with them on the phone in the evening? Are you so far away that an occasional visit is prohibitive? Isn't it rather arrogant to think that your way is the only way?

I shudder when I read an obituary that says "Online condolences can be sent to www.FuneralsRus.com"

I have the techno stuff, but I can certainly sympathize with the people who would rather see and hear their loved ones than the impersonal Facebook venue.
That was quite a jump with assumptions on your part!

My sisters and I live close to my parents. In fact, they have two homes and I even have a second home near their second home. They receive calls from someone in the family at least once daily and we are in and out of their homes - adult children and grandchildren, as well.

I can't believe you would address me with this condescending tone - suggesting that I should give my mother a time to call me, lol. Like I haven't? And like she wouldn't hear from me in the evening if she simply waited until after normal working hours? And like she didn't have a career and knows full well personal telephone calls are limited in any business setting?

And to suggest my sisters and I and our children do not write thank you notes, send cards, etc . . . your post is full of all sorts of assumptions, none of which apply to me and my family, but it surely sounds like someone in your life has ticked you off for you to transfer all this stuff to me, lol. DANG.

My mom would be very closely connected if she would choose to share info thru/ email (never would expect her to text) as she now has to type things up, copy them, and then mail them. This is very time consuming and also can be costly (she copies a lot of info b/c she is into genealogy). If she had her data on the computer, all she would have to do is cut and paste. How much easier it would be if she could send an email and get a quick reply back, including to other genealogists (not just family members and friends).

I hope you resolve whatever situation exists in your life and has made you so angry about technology - and to other folks posting on forums.
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Old 10-11-2011, 04:05 AM
 
Location: Location: Location
6,353 posts, read 7,838,998 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
That was quite a jump with assumptions on your part!

My sisters and I live close to my parents. In fact, they have two homes and I even have a second home near their second home. They receive calls from someone in the family at least once daily and we are in and out of their homes - adult children and grandchildren, as well.

I can't believe you would address me with this condescending tone - suggesting that I should give my mother a time to call me, lol. Like I haven't? And like she wouldn't hear from me in the evening if she simply waited until after normal working hours? And like she didn't have a career and knows full well personal telephone calls are limited in any business setting?

And to suggest my sisters and I and our children do not write thank you notes, send cards, etc . . . your post is full of all sorts of assumptions, none of which apply to me and my family, but it surely sounds like someone in your life has ticked you off for you to transfer all this stuff to me, lol. DANG.

My mom would be very closely connected if she would choose to share info thru/ email (never would expect her to text) as she now has to type things up, copy them, and then mail them. This is very time consuming and also can be costly (she copies a lot of info b/c she is into genealogy). If she had her data on the computer, all she would have to do is cut and paste. How much easier it would be if she could send an email and get a quick reply back, including to other genealogists (not just family members and friends).

I hope you resolve whatever situation exists in your life and has made you so angry about technology - and to other folks posting on forums.
DANG. Talk about assumptions. Not angry about technology. Had you bothered to read you would know that I am "hooked up". No situation in my life that has made me angry about anything. And not angry about you or any other folks posting.

I don't think I was being condescending when I replied to your post based on what information you imparted therein. You were the one who sounded as though you harbored some resentment that your parents were refusing to use the technology that you had supplied. You indicated (or so it seemed) that your parents either didn't know or didn't care if they interrupted your work schedule. I simply offered alternatives that you may or may not have considered.


Your recent response indicates that your Mother could avail herself of tons of help in her genealogical pursuits, and I definitely agree. But she must have at least a passing acquaintance with the 'net if she refers to info she got off the "world wide web".

Please be aware that the responses you garner are usually based on the facts that you include in your initial post, and generally are not meant to be a personal attack. DANG
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Old 10-11-2011, 06:41 AM
 
Location: Toronto, Ottawa Valley & Dunedin FL
1,409 posts, read 2,357,372 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zarathu View Post
Facebook friends are not real friends. This is just HYPE by facebook. Older people generally want to have real relationships, not these internet facebook things.
I'm sorry, but I disagree. It depends how you use Facebook, of course.

All my Facebook friends are *real friends*, people I know personally. Many of them I don't get to see that often, so Facebook is a great way to keep in touch with them, find out what they're doing, and share photos. With some of them, I share emails once in a while as well. This goes for family as well--I know what my nephew in Calgary is doing, sometimes my niece posts from Colorado or my other nephew from D.C. Otherwise I wouldn't hear about them.
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Old 10-11-2011, 06:49 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,212,814 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theatergypsy View Post
DANG. Talk about assumptions. Not angry about technology. Had you bothered to read you would know that I am "hooked up". No situation in my life that has made me angry about anything. And not angry about you or any other folks posting.

I don't think I was being condescending when I replied to your post based on what information you imparted therein. You were the one who sounded as though you harbored some resentment that your parents were refusing to use the technology that you had supplied. You indicated (or so it seemed) that your parents either didn't know or didn't care if they interrupted your work schedule. I simply offered alternatives that you may or may not have considered.


Your recent response indicates that your Mother could avail herself of tons of help in her genealogical pursuits, and I definitely agree. But she must have at least a passing acquaintance with the 'net if she refers to info she got off the "world wide web".

Please be aware that the responses you garner are usually based on the facts that you include in your initial post, and generally are not meant to be a personal attack. DANG
I am fully aware that responses are based on what is posted . . . and since I have been posting on CD for quite a few years, I know when someone is being presumptive and condescending, as well.

I will accept that you didn't mean your comments as a personal attack.

Back to the topic: my parents, who are very intelligent, professional folks, are intimidated by computers and sophisticated electronics in general. My dad made a crystal radio when he was about 10 years old, as a boy scout. He was very interested in technology in its early forms. My mom started typing in high school and consistently upgraded her typewriters with electronic models as she got older.

But it appears that somewhere along the line, the technology became complex to the point that they both felt they could not longer "fix" things that might go wrong in the manner they could when things were more "simple" (i.e., straighten out those jammed keys, replace a transistor).

They are also bowled over that so many items we all take for granted now are so expensive - and my family and I believe that they are afraid they will "ruin" the iPhone or iPad or Mac somehow. It appears they are very intimidated by the sophistication of the items - and if something went wrong, they would not be able to recover info or would be responsible for "messing things up."

My parents read many publications, watch the news and so are fully aware what is going on out there. My mom has been told on numerous occasions (she relays to us) that folks would send her info via email and then are very surprised that she doesn't have an email account. She DOES have an account (she has two - I set one up and my nephew set up the other) but she won't get on the computer to download things - she asks us to do it. OR - she simply says she doesn't have an account b/c she doesn't want to get into having to explain that HER files are not online.

And before i get a lecture about how I should offer to help my mom by uploading her files (sigh) . . . we HAVE offered to do this many times but she gets very angry about that and says she does not want her info floating around out there for anyone to access. We have tried to explain about private files, keeping stuff on her desktop . . . we have demonstrated all this to her . . . etc etc etc.

Despite all this, both my parents are fascinated w/ our iPhones, iPads and Macs . . . and when I walk in the door, that is one of the first things they ask about - wanting to see what is on my FB page, what photos have been uploaded, etc. They will call me and ask me to google something for them - and print off the info and bring it to them.

But they won't access any of this on their own. I have made the equipment and training available. Have set down many times and gone over things with them, as has the rest of the family. We leave notes! We give them videos! We are patient!

They simply won't take the next step.
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Old 10-11-2011, 06:57 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,212,814 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wwanderer View Post
I'm sorry, but I disagree. It depends how you use Facebook, of course.

All my Facebook friends are *real friends*, people I know personally. Many of them I don't get to see that often, so Facebook is a great way to keep in touch with them, find out what they're doing, and share photos. With some of them, I share emails once in a while as well. This goes for family as well--I know what my nephew in Calgary is doing, sometimes my niece posts from Colorado or my other nephew from D.C. Otherwise I wouldn't hear about them.
Same here, Wwanderer. The bulk of my high school classmates moved after graduation and other than knowing where their parents were - I lost touch with most of them (I moved, too). It has been a real blessing getting reconnected with these folks 40 years later, finding out the story of their lives since we parted at 18 . . . sharing photos of the places they live now, their kids and grandkids . . . and sharing the fun things as well (recipes, music, videos, etc).

How you use FB is up to you! I was reluctant to get on FB b/c I thought it would be too intrusive. But my son set me up in 2007. I never used it til one of my friends explained that she was getting in touch w/ classmates and it had been wonderful! So I finally tried out FB - set up my privacy settings to where I was comfortable w/ the limitations on what info was shared . . . and over the last 4 years - I have enjoyed FB very much.

Also, it may surprise some of you that many folks have several FB accounts out there . . . if you want one that only family members see, you can always create it under a fake name or using your name in a different way (your maiden name as your first name, for instance). But with all the privacy settings, there is no reason anyone you don't want to access your info will be accessing it.
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Old 10-11-2011, 04:09 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,950,422 times
Reputation: 6717
Quote:
Originally Posted by lenora View Post
My father is 85. He has a land line, cell phone, internet (FIOS) and email. I suspect he has stopped checking his email because of all of the spam. He keeps his portfolio online but he will not pay bills online. (Nor will he access his medical records online.) He may, however, purchase the new IPhone 5. He does not use an ATM card.

My ex MIL is 88. She, too, has the land line, the cell, internet and email. I don't recall if she uses an ATM card.

I personally do not know anyone who is in their 60's who does not have a cell phone, internet access, email, or an ATM card. Seriously.
I'm in my 60's - no ATM card. Cash a check every few months (about $200-300) for what little cash I spend (I am big into using credit cards to get points/miles).

Cheap prepaid cell phone (I hate telephones from the years I spent working and being on the phone 3-4 hours a day). My husband has the same. FWIW - I agree with the posters who say that a cellphone is an absolute necessity (I got my first one when my car broke down and I discovered that pay phones no longer existed). OTOH - when it comes to the cell phone - it's don't call me unless there's an emergency - I'll call you. BTW - if I were alone and/or thought my health was precarious - I'd look into getting some kind of medical alert gizmo that I could wear 24/7. My late FIL - who was otherwise allergic to technology - had one of those and it saved his life a couple of times.

I've owned computers since the 1970's and am "fluent" in computers. House now has 3 notebooks with wifi network. Three printers. My husband has one - I have a multi-function printer - and I also have an older printer with a parallel port (I have an old DOS program I use a lot that will only print to an LPT port). Cable TV with HD and DVR. Landline phone/answering machine with 2 phone lines. So when I have to be on the phone - I can be "hands free" on a speaker phone. We also have a bunch of cordless phones in the house.

My husband is the "music" guy - he uses a couple of iPods - iTunes and an MP3 player. We each have a Kindle. GPS and other tech bells and whistles in car (my husband does the music stuff for the car).

IOW - we use the technology we want to use - and avoid the technology we don't care for. Just like I avoid new appliances with overly complicated electronics (nothing like having an oven that won't work because it needs a $500 motherboard). I think the newspapers that I read every day make me smarter than a "smart phone" .

I find that one problem with computers that has surfaced as I've gotten older is my attachment to some legacy software. For example - I have an old stock charting program that absolutely refused to run on Windows 7 - so I am still using Windows XP (which Lenovo will do as a custom install when you buy a Thinkpad). Older people aren't the only ones who have this problem - younger people who are into gaming frequently have the same problem (I did my trouble-shooting with the stock program mostly on gamer chat boards).

There are other problems when you get old too. Like my father is 93. He uses a computer and email but doesn't exactly know what he's doing. So I would never trust him to do financial stuff on his computer (he doesn't understand security or security settings). And he still has an old computer with Windows XP. Because he won't spend the money to buy a higher end Lenovo unit and get Windows XP custom installed - he couldn't possibly migrate to Windows 7 himself - I don't want to spend a couple of weeks helping him to migrate to Windows 7 (about which I only know a little) - and my brother who uses a Mac won't help him to migrate to a Mac. FWIW - my father also has a prepaid cell phone - but doesn't use an ATM. Robyn
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Old 10-11-2011, 04:24 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,950,422 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
Well speaking of other people, my 86 year old neighbor does not have a computer, cell phone or an ATM card. So there are some folks out there who live without them.

I found it kind of funny though when she asked to see my Kindle. She now wants one and will ask her kids for one for Christmas if I promise to show her how to use it. So she will have a toe in the electronic age very soon.
Kindles are very very easy to use (about the hardest thing for someone without computer experience would be setting up the Amazon account to buy stuff) - and wonderful for people with poor eyesight (whether or not they're elderly) because the font size is adjustable. We've had Kindles since first generation (we're avid readers). But they were expensive then - pretty cheap now. A great holiday present IMO . Robyn
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Old 10-11-2011, 04:43 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,950,422 times
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Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
That is too bad, Huck. The nature of getting older is basically one of making most of rather irrelevant to most of the rest of the world, lol. Isolating one's self further from those who DO care is sad.

We have noticed that my parents have lately mentioned FaceBook. We are thinking they are feeling left out - and they SHOULD feel left out. The grandkids post so much info and share photos w/ us, their parents, and we share family photos with each other and our friends. But my mom and dad are left out of the process. My dad received an honorary doctorate and we all took photos and shared them on FB - but my parents missed out on all that. THey are starting to ask about "that FB stuff" - and we hope they will decide spending some time feeling comfy with the computer is worth the trade-off to stay in touch.

THEY are the ones who complain about not being in close enough touch w/ the rest of us. Unlike what some others have mentioned, we are the ones who don't respond fast enuff to them, many times. It helps that they have a cell phone, but basically - we all prefer texting and using email than talking on the phone. My sister and I work, so daytime phone calls to/from my parents can be quite interruptive. They have become quite interested in how my sister and I stay in daily touch our kids - thru/ texts, AIM chat, FB, etc. We wish they would hook up so they wouldn't feel so left out.
Well I disagree with this 100%. FB is just the current computer equivalent of what used to be the "Christmas letter to everyone". Totally meaningless to me. I could care less about a niece or nephew whose idea of a relationship is directing me to his/her FB page.

FWIW - my father opened a FB account - and found he had lots of people who wanted to be his friend only because they thought it was neat that he's really old. But getting together FTF - to go for lunch or dinner or even a drink - well forget about it.

BTW - I've been on chat boards (mostly involving food and investing) since the 90's - and I think it's fine getting to know people - strangers - who share your interests on line. I've met many of these people FTF when possible - in places as far away as Japan.

But the "friends and family Christmas letter to everyone" - on FB and updated constantly - just leaves me cold in the absence of any personal contact. Robyn
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Old 10-11-2011, 11:11 PM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,212,814 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
Well I disagree with this 100%. FB is just the current computer equivalent of what used to be the "Christmas letter to everyone". Totally meaningless to me. I could care less about a niece or nephew whose idea of a relationship is directing me to his/her FB page.

FWIW - my father opened a FB account - and found he had lots of people who wanted to be his friend only because they thought it was neat that he's really old. But getting together FTF - to go for lunch or dinner or even a drink - well forget about it.

BTW - I've been on chat boards (mostly involving food and investing) since the 90's - and I think it's fine getting to know people - strangers - who share your interests on line. I've met many of these people FTF when possible - in places as far away as Japan.

But the "friends and family Christmas letter to everyone" - on FB and updated constantly - just leaves me cold in the absence of any personal contact. Robyn
That is too bad that your FB experience has been so unrewarding. I have heard a lot of folks (of all ages) say that same thing.

All I know is . . . I shape my FB experience and it is nothing like an impersonal "letter to all." My friends and I have lively discussions, share info on everything from recipes to book recommendations . . . to photos and music and videos (and I don't mean - just the latest "funny" videos - I mean stuff we create ourselves).

I guess it all depends who you give your info to or invite to be part of your friends list. If someone I don't care to have involved in my life sends me an invite, I simply refuse it, lol.

I have heard really strange things about folks who have become "friends" w/ their kids, for ex, and then are offended what they read. I can't imagine what types of things folks are posting - sounds like private info that shouldn't be broadcast. So I suppose it all comes down to sharing that space on FB w/ folks who you actually enjoy corresponding with - and who you spend time with in "real life."

It's not as though your quality of life will be impacted by not having FB. It is a social marketing tool and can be a lot of fun and a great way to keep in touch - as long as you actually like the folks you are interacting with.
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