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Old 11-10-2011, 05:40 AM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,745 posts, read 4,217,509 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tijlover View Post
<snip>
I'm way too chicken to even have my blood pressure taken or my pulse and I'm 61!

I had read that Jackie Kennedy, a smoker no less, hadn't seen a Dr. in 30 years up until she got Hodgkin's Disease. Hey, Jackie! I'm following you!!
I certainly hope not...Jackie was 64 years old at the time of her death.
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Old 11-10-2011, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,737,509 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by subject2change View Post
I think that happens on occasion. People who tend to be sedentary are usually more so after retirement, and someone who drinks too much during their working years may really let things get out of hand when they don't have to keep things together for their job. But I wonder how often it is that, someone who dies relatively soon after retirement left their job in part because they were feeling unwell and not able to keep up anymore, and they just didn't tell people this.
I agree. You have given additional, and very plausible, reasons why people may die soon after retirement to go along with the scenario I painted. I did not mean to imply that my scenario explained all the deaths which occur soon after retirement. Some people are going to die a lot younger than others regardless of work/retirement status from a combination of genetic and lifestyle reasons.

Statistically, being socially isolated and not having meaningful activities is associated with earlier death, along with a host of other factors such as lack of exercise, smoking, poor diet, and obesity. So some people who died soon after retirement would have died at the same age anyway even if they had continued working, while for others retirement creates the isolated-no-meaningful-activities risk factor.

And of course there's the other side of the coin; if one has a very high stress and long-hours job and if one derives little satisfaction from that job, retiring may well lengthen life through stress reduction and increased social interaction with family and friends.
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Old 11-10-2011, 09:30 AM
 
4,343 posts, read 6,057,486 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by subject2change View Post
I think that happens on occasion. People who tend to be sedentary are usually more so after retirement, and someone who drinks too much during their working years may really let things get out of hand when they don't have to keep things together for their job. But I wonder how often it is that, someone who dies relatively soon after retirement left their job in part because they were feeling unwell and not able to keep up anymore, and they just didn't tell people this.
I tend to think it goes the other way. Husband was behind a desk or on airplanes his whole career. He retired at 58 and lost 20 lbs by eating right, golfing and exercising. I think it's work that will kill you.
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Old 02-24-2014, 09:20 PM
 
3,279 posts, read 6,607,924 times
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I had a co-worker who retired in his late 50s and two weeks later, we received news that he had died!!

No cancer, no history of health problems. He just had a heart attack and died.
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Old 02-24-2014, 09:29 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,932,349 times
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A lot die at young age too; stop worrying about it. When your dead you wouldn't worry about any money left; guaranteed. Your wife can then live it up with that boyfriend of hers:LOL.
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Old 02-24-2014, 09:42 PM
 
3,279 posts, read 6,607,924 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ipoetry View Post
I tend to think it goes the other way. Husband was behind a desk or on airplanes his whole career. He retired at 58 and lost 20 lbs by eating right, golfing and exercising. I think it's work that will kill you.
If you have a desk job and you don't set aside time each day for exercise, you are setting yourself up for disaster.

About a third of my office is made up of fatties who are on 10 different prescription medications. I'm positive none of them exercise at all.

You have to take care of yourself.
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Old 02-25-2014, 09:41 AM
 
2,912 posts, read 3,549,656 times
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The life expectancy of a 64-year-old man is 18.2 years (age 82.2). Yes, you could retire at 64 and die at 68, but that would be unlikely.

See the tables: Actuarial Life Table
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Old 02-25-2014, 10:08 AM
 
3,438 posts, read 4,732,531 times
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When I was 18 my father simply said..........." don't save your entire paycheck. don't spend your entire paycheck. Strike a balance "

That statement made 51 years ago is still true today.
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Old 02-25-2014, 10:39 AM
 
Location: Nebraska
1,886 posts, read 2,299,956 times
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The company that I retired from posted all the retirements on a company news board, normally i would see their death notice within 2 years if they retired in their 60's and 70's. However, when some on retired early, like in their 50's, they would live another 20-30 years. I noticed this trend for the 30 years that I work for there.

The only conclusion that I could come up with is that if they retired early they did it by there own decision and were young enough to establish their new retirement life. The people that retired at older ages just sat around drinking and watching TV, while the ones that retired at younger ages were out playing golf, walking in the park, and starting new hobbies. So to make it a short story boredom may have played a part in their death.
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Old 02-25-2014, 11:06 AM
 
3,438 posts, read 4,732,531 times
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My wife and I retired at age 62.

Relocated 870 miles south to a milder 4 season climate ( 2012)

Lots of plans on keeping very busy and neither one of us were over weight, had health problem, drank or smoke.

My wife died Thanksgiving morning after losing her short battle with ALS.

You never know what the future holds.
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