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Old 10-13-2011, 12:49 AM
 
26,589 posts, read 52,257,058 times
Reputation: 20405

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boompa View Post
I believe I said MY LANDLORD DIED, his family sold the building.
Oakland is NOT San Francisco, Real Estate prices where I lived never went down more than 10% and are presently higher than they were at the peak of the bubble. Just Zillow around 94121
Landlord selling the building or death has no effect in most cases... except in the very limited cases when a unit is exempt from SF Rent Control.

Buildings change hands everyday and for the most parts tenants don't know or care.

1.13m was the market median peak for 94121... current value has fallen to below 800k... roughly a 30% decline in median sales price.

94121, San Francisco average and median listing prices - Trulia.com

Last edited by Ultrarunner; 10-13-2011 at 01:19 AM.. Reason: Add Median Sales Link for 94121
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Old 10-13-2011, 07:32 AM
 
28,231 posts, read 39,872,938 times
Reputation: 36735
I see the request by the OP is being completely ignored. Please take your arguments elsewhere.

Believe it or not the rest of us don't care about what you are arguing about.
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Old 10-13-2011, 08:13 AM
 
Location: Sierra Vista, AZ
16,133 posts, read 20,814,828 times
Reputation: 8293
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas User View Post
Even East Oakland is expensive.
I know, I looked around Jack london Square when they put in all of those condo's. I'd sooner ferry in from Vallejo and get one of those larger condos on Mare Island
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Old 10-13-2011, 08:24 AM
 
Location: Sierra Vista, AZ
16,133 posts, read 20,814,828 times
Reputation: 8293
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultrarunner View Post
Landlord selling the building or death has no effect in most cases... except in the very limited cases when a unit is exempt from SF Rent Control.

Buildings change hands everyday and for the most parts tenants don't know or care.

1.13m was the market median peak for 94121... current value has fallen to below 800k... roughly a 30% decline in median sales price.

94121, San Francisco average and median listing prices - Trulia.com
Who will renew your lease. My landlord died the buyer did not want to rent my flat out. You are just being argumentative. Try telling me that I can force my landlord to renew my lease and not let him move into my unit.

A lot of those sales are single dwellings not having flats, old enough that the first thing you do is tear them down, and how many have a decent location. I'm telling you my experience you tell me statistics. you go there and do better.

I moved to Arizona and every month I put the $2,500 that I would be paying in rent goes in the bank. Any loss I have taken here was made up in one year. In retirement I'm a lot more comfortable with that. My property taxes on a 5 year old 2000+ sq ft single level home are under $2,000. Look at my profile
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Old 10-13-2011, 11:37 AM
 
26,589 posts, read 52,257,058 times
Reputation: 20405
The SF Bay Area is a great place to retire and very affordable for many... this is why so many seniors refuse to move even having children that have relocated to neighboring States...

Not much fun living somewhere dependant on Air Conditioning/Heating for large parts of the year... Texas and Arizona broke records for extreme heat and draught... people die from this.

The SF Bay Area has near ideal weather and should not be discounted.

The region also has outstanding medical care, both University Hospitals, outstanding Public Hospitals that have Pioneered care/treatments for a variety of maladies...

The region has huge overlapping Social Services, unlimited opportunities for cultural events, as mentioned... some of the best consistent weather in terms on heating and cooling requirements, no ice or snow to deal with, good air quality, several international airports with flights destinations throughout the world..., prop 13 protection for homeowners and cities with some of the most stringent rent control ordinances in the country that specifically protect seniors in Berkeley and San Francisco...

In short, older people are not moving away unless they are cashing out or to be closer to loved ones...

The sharp decline in property values, 20 to 80%... make the area even more attractive... many that have left would still be here if it hadn't been for the Real Estate Bubble.

No place will be "Best" for everyone...

Last edited by Ultrarunner; 10-13-2011 at 04:31 PM.. Reason: typo
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Old 10-13-2011, 11:48 AM
 
26,589 posts, read 52,257,058 times
Reputation: 20405
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boompa View Post
Who will renew your lease. My landlord died the buyer did not want to rent my flat out. You are just being argumentative. Try telling me that I can force my landlord to renew my lease and not let him move into my unit.
Many of my SF property owners would love the freedom not to renew below market leases... unfortunately, their loss is the tenant's gain due to strict rent control which has even more protection for seniors and disabled.

Quote:
A lot of those sales are single dwellings not having flats, old enough that the first thing you do is tear them down, and how many have a decent location. I'm telling you my experience you tell me statistics. you go there and do better.
Well, I live here and plan to grow old here because it is affordable on so many levels... the stats are the market 94121 zip code you asked me to research. I prefer the value of living in Oakland adjacent to San Francisco... Each morning, I look out the window and see the SF Skyline... if I lived in SF... I would look out the window and see Oakland ;-)

Quote:
I moved to Arizona and every month I put the $2,500 that I would be paying in rent goes in the bank. Any loss I have taken here was made up in one year. In retirement I'm a lot more comfortable with that. My property taxes on a 5 year old 2000+ sq ft single level home are under $2,000. Look at my profile
Sacrifice often brings benefits... Personally, I choose not to live anywhere dependant of Air Conditioning... I have friends that love living in Arizona... except the brutal summer heat and finding a rattle snake on their back porch.

The Bay Area is a special place and for some... nothing else can compare

Last edited by Ultrarunner; 10-13-2011 at 12:49 PM..
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Old 10-13-2011, 01:50 PM
 
12,671 posts, read 21,050,646 times
Reputation: 2625
How is it affordable? My goal is to retire in Bay Area though.
You mean Kaisar health?



Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultrarunner View Post
The SF Bay Area is a great place to retire and very affordable for many... this is why so many seniors refuse to move even having children that have relocated to neighboring States...

Not much fun living somewhere dependant on Air Conditioning/Heating for large parts of the year... Texas and Arizona broke records for extreme heat and draught... people die from this.

The SF Bay Area has near ideal weather and should not be discounted.

The region also has outstanding medical care, both University Hospitals, outstanding Public Hospitals that have Pioneered care/treatments for a variety of maladies...

The region has huge overlapping Social Services, unlimited opportunities for cultural events, as mentioned... some of the best consistent weather in terms on heating and cooling requirements, no ice or snow to deal with, good air quality, several international airports with flights destinations throughout the world..., prop 13 protection for homeowners and cities with some of the most stringent rent control ordinances in the country that specifically protect seniors in Berkeley and San Francisco...

In short, older people are not moving away unless they are cashing out or to be closer to loved ones...

The sharp decline in property values, 20 to 80%... make the area even more attractive... many that have left would still be here if it hadn't been for the Real Estate Bubble.
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Old 10-13-2011, 03:03 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,967,079 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Like many, I'm tired of seeing these "Best Places to Retire" annual lists written up by leading mainstream money magazines, with recommendations that seem pretty far-fetched to me.

I also see a lot of assumptions about places that may not be true across the board--such as California and New England are unaffordable. As some point out, in specific places some things are pricey and other things are not, balancing out the question of "affordability."

Many things are more objective, such as quality of medical facilities, things to do for seniors, kinds of housing available.

The one thing that is definitely subjective is "affordability." What is easily affordable for one may not be easily, or at all, affordable for another.

IMO, the best recommendations are from those on the ground, those actually living in or at least knowing a place very well firsthand.

If we were to stick to 5 simple questions, based on your living there (current or recently) how would you rate your recommendation for where to grow old? (Please don't list where not to.)

1. Niceness of the area, aesthetically
2. Driveability (traffic factor, distance factor)
3. Ease in access to basics: supermarket, library, P.O., stores, entertainment
4. Quality of medical facilities and senior living options
5. Affordable (all things considered, all kinds of taxes) for retirees of modest income, say $50K or under/year

Looking forward to responses.
This was my Original Post.

Can we please get back on topic please? All these side conversations are going nowhere. Thanks.
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Old 10-13-2011, 04:14 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,824 posts, read 18,832,665 times
Reputation: 33721
1. Niceness of the area, aesthetically

Massachusetts is gorgeous. You are never far from mountains, meadows, hills, the ocean. There are walking trails, pristine beaches, picturesque small towns and exciting cities.

2. Driveability (traffic factor, distance factor)

If you live near Boston forget it. If you live far enough away from Bean Town you will have country roads or good highways. Nice for driving. Nothing is that far away.

3. Ease in access to basics: supermarket, library, P.O., stores, entertainment

In a town you can walk to all of it except for entertainment probably. For that you can take a train into Boston if you live close enough or drive to a small city or town that has shows or whatever. There are lots of independently owned restaurants so you aren't stuck eating at the boring and not so good chains. Lots of unique shopping as well as malls. You can even get to NY City for shows by train but it's kind of expensive.

4. Quality of medical facilities and senior living options

Medical is really high quality--Mass General Hospital and several others, probably some of the best in the world. Also the state provides health insurance that you can buy into. Of course that doesn't help you when you're on Medicare.

Senior living--you really need to have money. You can get a condo for maybe $200,000 but the fees will be high. Apartments are about $1500 plus heat and electricity for a one bedroom but a lot more in Boston. Heat and electric (for a/c) are high.

5. Affordable (all things considered, all kinds of taxes) for retirees of modest income, say $50K or under/year

You probably could not afford to live here unless you had a lot of money from the sale of your house. Even then, the taxes and fees and utilities can get you. You're better off being very rich or very poor. Very poor can get subsidized housing which isn't that good and not enough to go around but at least you get to live in a wonderful area. (If you can stand Jan through mid April. Ideally, you get out of here at that time of the year.)
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Old 10-13-2011, 04:36 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,967,079 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
1. Niceness of the area, aesthetically

Massachusetts is gorgeous. You are never far from mountains, meadows, hills, the ocean. There are walking trails, pristine beaches, picturesque small towns and exciting cities.

2. Driveability (traffic factor, distance factor)

If you live near Boston forget it. If you live far enough away from Bean Town you will have country roads or good highways. Nice for driving. Nothing is that far away.

3. Ease in access to basics: supermarket, library, P.O., stores, entertainment

In a town you can walk to all of it except for entertainment probably. For that you can take a train into Boston if you live close enough or drive to a small city or town that has shows or whatever. There are lots of independently owned restaurants so you aren't stuck eating at the boring and not so good chains. Lots of unique shopping as well as malls. You can even get to NY City for shows by train but it's kind of expensive.

4. Quality of medical facilities and senior living options

Medical is really high quality--Mass General Hospital and several others, probably some of the best in the world. Also the state provides health insurance that you can buy into. Of course that doesn't help you when you're on Medicare.

Senior living--you really need to have money. You can get a condo for maybe $200,000 but the fees will be high. Apartments are about $1500 plus heat and electricity for a one bedroom but a lot more in Boston. Heat and electric (for a/c) are high.

5. Affordable (all things considered, all kinds of taxes) for retirees of modest income, say $50K or under/year

You probably could not afford to live here unless you had a lot of money from the sale of your house. Even then, the taxes and fees and utilities can get you. You're better off being very rich or very poor. Very poor can get subsidized housing which isn't that good and not enough to go around but at least you get to live in a wonderful area. (If you can stand Jan through mid April. Ideally, you get out of here at that time of the year.)
So are you recommending Boston if it's not affordable? Or is that major factor eliminating Boston and surrounds from the list?

(btw, I'd return to Beantown in a heartbeat if I could afford it. I somehow afforded it in the 60s as a student...everything was affordable then. I lived on Mission Hill in an apt above a hardware store, surrounded by students from the Museum School. Now, that area is all gentrified....there is no place there to be poor anymore...)
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