U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 10-13-2011, 04:43 PM
 
26,589 posts, read 52,286,267 times
Reputation: 20413

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas User View Post
How is it affordable? My goal is to retire in Bay Area though.
You mean Kaiser health?
Let me expand by the numbers... my apologies for being too specific in my previous posts...

1. Niceness of the area, aesthetically

Bay Area by any measure is nice and aesthetically pleasing... both in architecture and natural beauty and as previously mentioned... near perfect climate.


2. Driveability (traffic factor, distance factor)


Bay Area is very drivable... I do it everyday... there are also alternatives... the ever expanding BART system, rail, cable cars, light rail, ferries and bus systems


3. Ease in access to basics: supermarket, library, P.O., stores, entertainment


The Metro Areas have everything within walking distance... everything.


4. Quality of medical facilities and senior living options

Folks come from all over California, Nevada and Oregon to be treated at Stanford and UC Medical... the quality is top notch and many retiree's, even those that have moved to the east coast will return for care under the Kaiser system...


5. Affordable (all things considered, all kinds of taxes) for retirees of modest income, say $50K or under/year

As mentioned... although not as clearly as I should have... Long time Home Owners are reluctant to leave because property taxes are quite reasonable under Prop 13... long time renters in San Francisco and Berkeley are in similar situation because Rent Control stabilizes their rent and many pay only a fraction of market rent...

New Senior arrivals of very modest means will find senior facilities that are new and ideally located where rent is based on income...

Last edited by Ultrarunner; 10-14-2011 at 05:16 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-13-2011, 05:14 PM
 
12,671 posts, read 21,056,165 times
Reputation: 2625
I lived in San Jose for 13 year and Hayward for 2 years.

I like EVERYTHING about Bay Area expect the COL.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultrarunner View Post
Let me expand by the numbers... my apologies for being to specific in my previous posts...

1. Niceness of the area, aesthetically

Bay Area by any measure is nice and aesthetically pleasing... both in architecture and natural beauty and as previously mentioned... near perfect climate.


2. Driveability (traffic factor, distance factor)

Bay Area is very drivable... I do it everyday... there are also alternatives... the ever expanding BART system, rail, cable cars, light rail, ferries and bus systems


3. Ease in access to basics: supermarket, library, P.O., stores, entertainment

The Metro Areas have everything within walking distance... everything.


4. Quality of medical facilities and senior living options

Folks come from all over California, Nevada and Oregon to be treated at Stanford and UC Medical... the quality is top notch and many retiree's, even those that have moved to the east coast will return for care under the Kaiser system...


5. Affordable (all things considered, all kinds of taxes) for retirees of modest income, say $50K or under/year

As mentioned... although not as clearly as I should have... Long time Home Owners are reluctant to leave because property taxes are quite reasonable under Prop 13... long time renters in San Francisco and Berkeley are in similar situation because Rent Control stabilizes their rent and many pay only a fraction of market rent...

New Senior arrivals of very modest means will find senior facilities that are new and ideally located where rent is based on income...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-13-2011, 09:43 PM
 
Location: Wayward Pines,ID
1,870 posts, read 3,442,940 times
Reputation: 1466
Did not see a plug for PNW yet so here goes:

Coeur d'Alene Idaho

1. Niceness of the area, aesthetically
One of the most beautiful places I have ever been.

2. Driveability (traffic factor, distance factor)
Nice freeway connecting Spokane to CDA. Five minutes and you are in the wilderness.

3. Ease in access to basics: supermarket, library, P.O., stores, entertainment
If you live right in town then you could walk to everything. I live in a small town in the area and it is 2 miles to a grocery/gas, 8 miles to a 24 hour market.

4. Quality of medical facilities and senior living options
Unfortunately both my wife and I have quite a bit of experience in visiting the ER and Urgent care and GPs. Outstanding is all I can say. There are different types of senior living as far as extra care type.

5. Affordable (all things considered, all kinds of taxes) for retirees of modest income, say $50K or under/year
I can only compare to CA where I was before and everything is less. Every tax is less, housing less, electricity less. I would still have to work in CA and I can be retired here.


PS Not for everybody as it is a real 4 seasons with tons of snow, but great if you are tired of incessant heat and humidity.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2011, 12:25 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,838 posts, read 18,851,047 times
Reputation: 33746
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
So are you recommending Boston if it's not affordable? Or is that major factor eliminating Boston and surrounds from the list?

(btw, I'd return to Beantown in a heartbeat if I could afford it. I somehow afforded it in the 60s as a student...everything was affordable then. I lived on Mission Hill in an apt above a hardware store, surrounded by students from the Museum School. Now, that area is all gentrified....there is no place there to be poor anymore...)
That's the problem--there's no place to be poor anymore in MA. Personally, I'm not a Boston person, I don't like cities, but as a state I'd rate MA as the best.

I think a place like Newburyport or to the west, Northampton would be perfect for retirement and someone could probably get by on $50,000. Gloucester or Rockport for people with boats and artsy types. It's worth looking into but you won't have a lot of money left over after housing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2011, 04:02 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic east coast
5,371 posts, read 9,862,107 times
Reputation: 10243
I love coastal North Carolina, except for the humidity in the summer...but mild winters make up for it. Affordable? Pretty much. Reasonable property taxes, we pay some extra for wind insurance (about $1100/yr.). Utilities not too bad...food pretty much the same as elsewhere. Friendly people and I feel safe in my little community, nice library, I'm pretty content. Warm ocean for swimming. Oh, and good bike riding--it's pretty flat here. Buyer's market right now, some house bargains to be found.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2011, 04:10 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,735,102 times
Reputation: 32304
Quote:
Originally Posted by LittleDolphin View Post
I love coastal North Carolina,... Oh, and good bike riding--it's pretty flat here.
When I was a cyclist for about 10 years, I always considered the hills and mountains a great plus for cycling. The flats get pretty boring, whereas the hills and mountain passes offer some challenge and some variety - good workouts on the ascents, and nice recovery and enjoyable speeds on the descents. I have passed cars on the curvy mountain downhills. Not to mention the great views and panoramas. I would just hate to live somewhere with no mountains close by.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2011, 04:48 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic east coast
5,371 posts, read 9,862,107 times
Reputation: 10243
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
When I was a cyclist for about 10 years, I always considered the hills and mountains a great plus for cycling. The flats get pretty boring, whereas the hills and mountain passes offer some challenge and some variety - good workouts on the ascents, and nice recovery and enjoyable speeds on the descents. I have passed cars on the curvy mountain downhills. Not to mention the great views and panoramas. I would just hate to live somewhere with no mountains close by.
I dig what you're saying and it's truth, but for this not-so-young woman, I'm loving the flat...the knees don't love powering up the hills so much any more...and I, too, love mountain vistas..we go there frequently...especially this time of year for the Fall colors. Spring's pretty nice, too, with the Spring flowers and water falls...if my novel (Falling Through Time) takes off, I dearly would love a tiny mountain cabin in WNC--then I'd truly have the best of both worlds.

NC is truly a beautiful state with much diversity.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-15-2011, 07:38 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic east coast
5,371 posts, read 9,862,107 times
Reputation: 10243
"there is no place there to be poor anymore"--quote from New England Girl. Ah yes, the sad truth of many lovely places that have grown popular and desirable and thus not affordable by many of 99%ers.

When I wanted to turn my hand to creative writing after toiling in the advertising trade for a number of years, I quickly found the SF Bay area was not budget-friendly for the budget-minded. It had been when I first moved there--it was the best of worlds back then, but we wise women soon learn to roll with the punches, yes?

There are still some affordable lovely, congenial places left for we creative spirits, but most are not close to major cities that have thriving employment opportunities. But we can ferret them out with some effort.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-15-2011, 07:49 AM
 
4,481 posts, read 4,742,235 times
Reputation: 9940
Quote:
Originally Posted by LittleDolphin View Post
I love coastal North Carolina, except for the humidity in the summer...but mild winters make up for it. Affordable? Pretty much. Reasonable property taxes, we pay some extra for wind insurance (about $1100/yr.). Utilities not too bad...food pretty much the same as elsewhere. Friendly people and I feel safe in my little community, nice library, I'm pretty content. Warm ocean for swimming. Oh, and good bike riding--it's pretty flat here. Buyer's market right now, some house bargains to be found.

Hi there,
Yes, coastal NC is lovely. I was talking with a friend about New Bern but that is not really very coastal. What general area do you live... if I might ask. What damage did you have with all the storms?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-15-2011, 08:00 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic east coast
5,371 posts, read 9,862,107 times
Reputation: 10243
We live north of Wilmington, south of New Bern (a lovely town). After seven years of living here and a few hurricanes, we've not had anything major happen. Some tree limbs down and such--until this last one, Irene, this Fall. A neighbor's big pine came down in our back yard but missed the house and shed. We split the cost and labor of sawing it up. We also lost some cedar shakes off the side of the house--naturally, the cost of repair was less than our deductible...

This may sound odd, but given all the possible natural disasters of tornado, earthquake, flood and fire, I'd pick hurricanes. Why? You get a lot of advance warning, you can button up your house, and can either stay or go.

If you pick your home's location carefully, it's likely you'll make it through with little damage--the worst damage comes from storm surge and flooding, rather than wind damage. Our house is not directly on the water and not in a flood zone.

Earthquakes in the Bay area used to terrify and traumatize me. Something's very unnatural when the very ground beneath your feet becomes unstable--with no warning whatsoever. And we lived right atop a fault line that was overdue to let go either "tomorrow"--or a hundred years from tomorrow--the uncertainty was nerve-wracking.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top