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Old 10-16-2011, 05:07 PM
 
Location: Prospect, KY
5,288 posts, read 17,960,936 times
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My husband and I took two trips to New Bern in order to consider it as a retirement possibility. Although there were many things we liked about New Bern, ultimately it was the crime rate that caused us to mark it off our list. Crime is very high there. Neighborhood watches abound.

One neighborhood we were considering (Taberna) had quite a few police cars parked along the streets. We stopped a police officer in town one day to ask him about this and he said it was a crime deterrent they were trying - trying to see if the off-duty police officers parking their cars along the streets would keep crime down.

We went into town for dinner a couple of times and decided we did not feel safe walking around in the evening. The crime rate is over the national average, which to us is quite high and not something we want to deal with.
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Old 10-16-2011, 06:31 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in Texas
5,230 posts, read 11,675,564 times
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I'm still looking at Virginia to retire and found out via a search yesterday that Highland County is the least populated in the state. I knew Craig County had a low population, but Highland is less by about one half and has more land area.

I just don't know how many more Texas summers I can stand. Of course, I want to get away from the wicked severe storms too and even though VA has them, I don't think they're as bad as they are here.

Idaho is my second choice, but not where it's flat and barren. Therefore, I'd have to really like a lot of snow and I'm not sure about that either. I like snow and we do get it in central Texas, but it's gone before we know it. Being raised in southern CA, I just don't know how I'd fare in a real snowy state. Actually, I can't imagine it being any worse than being stuck in the house due to the killer heat. The difference, of course, would be the traveling pain on the treacherous roads.

Time will tell what to do, what to do.
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Old 10-16-2011, 06:35 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in Texas
5,230 posts, read 11,675,564 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
BUT.... It is AFFORDABLE territory, especially after a severe storm yr.

Many friends looking to get back to the farm (usually homeschoolers) headed to MO & AR with the 'spoils' from their every 24 month home swapping on left coast. I have 4 friends (families) who 'retired' pre age 40 with that strategy. They are content on their 200 + acre places that are paid for and supporting their grocery / income needs.

Not for me I don't do east of Missouri river in summer or humidity very well. I like 50 degree sleeping nights in summer and my $35 cars aren't worth adding AC.
I know but one thing is for certain, I want to get away from wicked weather, heat that lasts for so many months, and humidity that won't go away either. I think this is the least humid summer we've had in Texas since I moved here 33 years ago, but the 90 days of triple digits, not to mention the fact of so many more days above 90 degrees, is just too much to go through again. It was the most gosh-awful summer since 1980. They're all sorry, but 2011 was so bad.
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Old 10-16-2011, 06:59 PM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,487,261 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Canine*Castle View Post
I'm still looking at Virginia to retire and found out via a search yesterday that Highland County is the least populated in the state. I knew Craig County had a low population, but Highland is less by about one half and has more land area.

I just don't know how many more Texas summers I can stand. Of course, I want to get away from the wicked severe storms too and even though VA has them, I don't think they're as bad as they are here.

Idaho is my second choice, but not where it's flat and barren. Therefore, I'd have to really like a lot of snow and I'm not sure about that either. I like snow and we do get it in central Texas, but it's gone before we know it. Being raised in southern CA, I just don't know how I'd fare in a real snowy state. Actually, I can't imagine it being any worse than being stuck in the house due to the killer heat. The difference, of course, would be the traveling pain on the treacherous roads.

Time will tell what to do, what to do.
I too was raised in SoCal but went to a military academy in Minnesota and loved the snow. Of course, being in a boarding school I didn't have to drive but I've lived in other snowy areas and enjoyed them.

We purposely moved, in retirement, from NorCal to a land of four distinct seasons, one of which often includes snow. Keep in mind that when retired, if you keep the larder well-stocked and have a back-up generator, you shouldn't have to drive anywhere until the roads have been well cleared. If you're married, just make sure the two of you can get along while housebound for a bit.
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Old 10-16-2011, 09:18 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in Texas
5,230 posts, read 11,675,564 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
I too was raised in SoCal but went to a military academy in Minnesota and loved the snow. Of course, being in a boarding school I didn't have to drive but I've lived in other snowy areas and enjoyed them.

We purposely moved, in retirement, from NorCal to a land of four distinct seasons, one of which often includes snow. Keep in mind that when retired, if you keep the larder well-stocked and have a back-up generator, you shouldn't have to drive anywhere until the roads have been well cleared. If you're married, just make sure the two of you can get along while housebound for a bit.
Perhaps I would like it and when retired, I don't have to get out in it. I'm just thinking I may want to move before then, but that's just more to worry about ... finding another job and all. No, I'm not married, so there is no problem there. I really do want four seasons and that, I would hope, would be each one lasting three months.
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Old 10-17-2011, 07:14 AM
 
Location: Orlando
1,987 posts, read 2,637,223 times
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We live in North Florida, and our summers are long and brutal. On the other hand, we never have to shovel snow, or drive in snow, or deal in any other way with snow.


We deal with the summer heat and humidity the same way northerners deal with winter: we don't go out in it unless we absolutely have to.


When I once complained about the summer heat and humidity, someone told me, "If the weather here were perfect, you wouldn't be able to afford to live here!"


I think you have to decide which you hate less: snowy winters or hot summers. I prefer the snowy winters (I'm a native Pennsylvanian), but DH prefers the hot summers, so that's why we live in Florida.
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Old 10-17-2011, 07:35 AM
 
Location: Whereever we have our RV parked
8,787 posts, read 7,707,284 times
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What is unfortunate is that one of the nicest climates you can find is NEw Mexico. Because of the high elevation, many of its cities have very moderate weather in the summer, but are not all that cold in the winter. Unfortunately, many of the areas have crime problems, and the taxes are not friendly toward retirees with modest incomes. Health care is kinda borderline also. The Lubbock, Texas hospitals are frequently used by New Mexico residents. Canine Castle, you might check out Ruidoso and Roswell, NM. They might be closer to what you're looking for. The other area that's nice is eastern Tenn. or western NC. Mild winters and summers.
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Old 10-17-2011, 12:48 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,740,386 times
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Default Going outside in heat and humidity versus going outside in cold and snow

Quote:
Originally Posted by WellShoneMoon View Post
I think you have to decide which you hate less: snowy winters or hot summers.
That's a very good summary for much of our nation! Someone else was saying that the way people cope is to stay inside as much as possible during whichever season is extreme where you live, and that's also a very good summary for much of our nation. But here's my thought on that:

If you are outside during hot and humid weather you are totally miserable, and there is nothing that can be done about it. but if you are outside during the cold and snow, properly dressed, you are not miserable at all. What a difference! Sure, coping with the snow is a hassle, but it doesn't really take that long to install or remove snow chains on the two drive wheels, and I know because I've done it. A lot depends on your attitude towards it. I vote with not being miserable. I never could understand living in Florida year round, and I would perceive hurrying from air-conditioned house to air-conditioned car to air-conditioned office/store/restaurant as like being in prison. And I know because I've done it during extended visits to southern Louisiana in July and August and during shorter visits to Florida.
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Old 10-17-2011, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Prospect, KY
5,288 posts, read 17,960,936 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LittleDolphin View Post
Don't know much about crime in New Bern...on our visits, we've had nothing but a good time and felt safe. There's always crime no matter where you go, I suspect, and pockets to avoid. Picking your neighborhood and not being in the wrong place after dark kind of removes you from the danger zone. My former big, bad city makes New Bern feel like Mayberry to me.

Climate/weather...except for maybe California or certain areas of Spain or Italy, you're gonna get 3-4 months of uncomfortable weather pretty much where ever you live.. Here, in coastal NC, our months of misery are end of June-end of Sept. But in the winter, no snow to dig out of, no ice storms, no nasty March mud season. So pick which three months you want to be uncomfortable in. Me, I prefer the hot summers here with A/C (the nights are tropical and lovely) and beautiful ocean to swim in...and nice long Springs and long Autumns of perfect weather.
No offense, but why woudn't you know about crime in New Bern? Isn't that something that most would look into if they were considering New Bern as a retirement spot?

For a bit of a reality check, the city where we currently live has an annual crime average of 15. New Bern is around 450. These averages are based on statistics collected and figured by the FBI. Thefts, robberies and burglaries are extremely high in New Bern.

Yes, there is crime in every city, but why choose one that is over the national average? Feeling safe and being safe are two entirely different things. People in New Bern can put their heads in the sand and pretend it doesn't exisit - but crime exists there big time.
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Old 10-17-2011, 05:14 PM
 
4,481 posts, read 4,743,979 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
I too was raised in SoCal but went to a military academy in Minnesota and loved the snow. Of course, being in a boarding school I didn't have to drive but I've lived in other snowy areas and enjoyed them.

We purposely moved, in retirement, from NorCal to a land of four distinct seasons, one of which often includes snow. Keep in mind that when retired, if you keep the larder well-stocked and have a back-up generator, you shouldn't have to drive anywhere until the roads have been well cleared. If you're married, just make sure the two of you can get along while housebound for a bit.

That is exactly what my 82 yr old mother does. She lives alone on a dirt road in Vermont and just makes sure she has enough for herself and her pets.

Having to worry about getting to work in a storm or after one is getting to be a bit of a pain in the arse.
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