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Old 11-13-2011, 05:11 PM
mlb
 
Location: North Monterey County
3,194 posts, read 2,861,612 times
Reputation: 4891

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Quote:
Originally Posted by markg91359 View Post

The lack of diversity is a legitimate issue for those not of the LDS faith. This would really only be a concern to me if I were trying to raise a family there (btw I am LDS). I think for a couple without children or for a couple whose children have grown up, the lack of diversity is not a big issue.
We are child-free and not LDS. Why would you think a lack of diversity would not be an issue? Just because we don't have kids doesn't mean we don't appreciate and want to cultivate friendships and live in a community with people who are not like us.

I'm very tired of cookie-cutter communities. I would find it very boring to be in a community where everyone was the same.
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Old 11-14-2011, 10:44 AM
 
26,591 posts, read 52,344,141 times
Reputation: 20438
Quote:
Originally Posted by mlb View Post
A comment about how great the San Francisco Bay Area is.....

2. Expense. I have a sister who lives down the Peninsula -and yes, they are a Prop 13 house. She pays only a couple hundred dollars more a year for property taxes than I do here in Utah. However, everything else she buys - from her local community, suppliers, plumbers, car repair guys, etc., etc.? Horribly expensive. Because their expenses are POST-Prop 13...and they pass on those costs to the customer.
Just a comment on Prop 13.

Prop 13 applies to all property in California unless it is Exempt from Property Taxes...

So there isn't a privately owned home that isn't under Prop 13...

A person buying a home today will most likely be in the same situation as your sister if they own the home as long as she has.
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Old 11-15-2011, 04:45 AM
 
701 posts, read 1,532,735 times
Reputation: 792
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
On other CD retirement threads, some posters have said they do not want to depend on their family, and that kids owe their parents nothing.
I can't tell you how many times I've heard that sentiment from people who due to strokes or dementia are unable to manage their finances, their medications, or their meals let alone make and carry through with reasonable decisions on where to live where they can get the assistance they need.

The mail carrier reports that they are in the front yard in their pajamas during a blizzard or the landlord reports that they are roaming the building or .... and so the county sends out a social worker. The first question is always about family.

Though people often state that they don't want to bother their kids, that sentiment usually doesn't last long once the options are presented.

If there are no family members willing or able to step up and help make decisions, the county takes over. Often, they are placed in a facility where, unless they are among the lucky ones who have $4000+ or -/month in SS, pensions, and savings, their care is subsidized by govt. funding for the rest of their lives.

So instead of their own kids helping to care for them, everybody's kids are pitching in.

I can't tell you how many times I've listened to people explain that their plan for aging was that they never planned to live this long. No Plan B.

Those who don't want to depend on their own children when the time comes, better either have quite a nest egg tucked away (in which case the children will likely fall all over themselves to help out ) or select a retirement spot where the children of others are willing to subsidize assistance.
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Old 11-15-2011, 06:02 AM
Status: "Support the Mining Law of 1872" (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,587 posts, read 10,939,614 times
Reputation: 19234
I met a ninety-eight year old woman who lived in her own house with her dog. The house was immaculate. She was as lucid and aware as anyone half her age. I read of a local woman who died at the ripe old age of one hundred and seven. She lived in her rural home until six months before she died; she had voluntarily entered an assisted living facility. Best of all was my eldest aunt. Having worked until her late eighties, she finally retired when her employer died and she couldn't find another job. (She tried) She lived by herself and liked to go out to lunch a couple times every week. Her favorite place was a small restaurant about a half mile from her home. In nice weather she'd walk, in not so nice drive. She almost always had one Johnny Walker Red with water, then half of a club sandwich. One day the waitress, having brought her drink a few minutes before, came back with her sandwich. The drink was unfinished as was a cigarette in the ashtray; my aunt had quietly died. But she had lived for ninety-seven years.

For every horror story, there's a happy story.
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Old 11-15-2011, 06:29 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,991,724 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by PatRoy1 View Post
I can't tell you how many times I've heard that sentiment from people who due to strokes or dementia are unable to manage their finances, their medications, or their meals let alone make and carry through with reasonable decisions on where to live where they can get the assistance they need.

The mail carrier reports that they are in the front yard in their pajamas during a blizzard or the landlord reports that they are roaming the building or .... and so the county sends out a social worker. The first question is always about family.

Though people often state that they don't want to bother their kids, that sentiment usually doesn't last long once the options are presented.

If there are no family members willing or able to step up and help make decisions, the county takes over. Often, they are placed in a facility where, unless they are among the lucky ones who have $4000+ or -/month in SS, pensions, and savings, their care is subsidized by govt. funding for the rest of their lives.

So instead of their own kids helping to care for them, everybody's kids are pitching in.

I can't tell you how many times I've listened to people explain that their plan for aging was that they never planned to live this long. No Plan B.

Those who don't want to depend on their own children when the time comes, better either have quite a nest egg tucked away (in which case the children will likely fall all over themselves to help out ) or select a retirement spot where the children of others are willing to subsidize assistance.
That's telling it like it is, we'd all better take heed.

In our generation (the boomers), we (women especially, but also, men) really took care of the needs of our parents, even if we didn't physically take care of them. I mean we were there for them, calling all the time, helping them to shop, get to the doctor and back, etc. Every day I see a boomer gently guiding their mom or dad around a store. Now, our kids, i don't know.... I see our kids either stretched to the max with no time for mom or dad, or, quite frankly, in their own world, not being so interested in mom or dad. Maybe these "kids" will change when they get into their 40s and 50s, and will help in some way. But my sense is that the boomers are/were more conscientious and respectful of their parents, in general, than our kids will be toward us. Also, it was common in previous generations (even when we boomers were kids) for a grandma or grandpa (usually a grandma) to live with their family. Somehow I don't see the boomers doing that (as a natural thing to do).
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Old 11-15-2011, 06:31 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,991,724 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
I met a ninety-eight year old woman who lived in her own house with her dog. The house was immaculate. She was as lucid and aware as anyone half her age. I read of a local woman who died at the ripe old age of one hundred and seven. She lived in her rural home until six months before she died; she had voluntarily entered an assisted living facility. Best of all was my eldest aunt. Having worked until her late eighties, she finally retired when her employer died and she couldn't find another job. (She tried) She lived by herself and liked to go out to lunch a couple times every week. Her favorite place was a small restaurant about a half mile from her home. In nice weather she'd walk, in not so nice drive. She almost always had one Johnny Walker Red with water, then half of a club sandwich. One day the waitress, having brought her drink a few minutes before, came back with her sandwich. The drink was unfinished as was a cigarette in the ashtray; my aunt had quietly died. But she had lived for ninety-seven years.

For every horror story, there's a happy story.
Great story, love it!
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Old 11-15-2011, 07:16 AM
 
701 posts, read 1,532,735 times
Reputation: 792
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
I met a ninety-eight year old woman who lived in her own house with her dog. The house was immaculate. She was as lucid and aware as anyone half her age. I read of a local woman who died at the ripe old age of one hundred and seven. She lived in her rural home until six months before she died; she had voluntarily entered an assisted living facility. Best of all was my eldest aunt. Having worked until her late eighties, she finally retired when her employer died and she couldn't find another job. (She tried) She lived by herself and liked to go out to lunch a couple times every week. Her favorite place was a small restaurant about a half mile from her home. In nice weather she'd walk, in not so nice drive. She almost always had one Johnny Walker Red with water, then half of a club sandwich. One day the waitress, having brought her drink a few minutes before, came back with her sandwich. The drink was unfinished as was a cigarette in the ashtray; my aunt had quietly died. But she had lived for ninety-seven years.

For every horror story, there's a happy story.
Terrific stories. With any luck at, we'll all have similar life stories.

Our next door neighbor passed away in her own bed, just shy of her 90th birthday. Her home was immaculate, she was always baking and fixing food for everyone that came by. We traded novels and good times. She was a delight.

She also needed a fair amount of help to continue living independently. She had a younger friend who took her shopping and to church. Her kids helped out with home repairs, cleaning the gutters, etc. We shoveled her porch, walks and driveway, mowed her lawn, drove her to doctor appts. and, occasionally, the ER.

I have been in the homes of older people who are lucid and going about their business without children or neighbors who help out. Often there is a lot of "deferred maintenance" on their homes. One woman's basement had collapsed in a corner due to spring rains. She had hired a handy man to brace it a bit but the county found out about it when the oil company refused to refill the oil tank because of the house was on the verge of collapsing.

The person who posted about helping out seniors in the community--let's hope their is a legion of you folks around.

According to AARP, 22 million of us are caring for elderly parents. Not sure whether the next generation will be up for doing that.
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Old 11-15-2011, 07:19 AM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,745 posts, read 4,222,137 times
Reputation: 6866
Quote:
Originally Posted by PatRoy1 View Post
<snip>
If there are no family members willing or able to step up and help make decisions, the county takes over. Often, they are placed in a facility where, unless they are among the lucky ones who have $4000+ or -/month in SS, pensions, and savings, their care is subsidized by govt. funding for the rest of their lives.

So instead of their own kids helping to care for them, everybody's kids are pitching in. <snip>
Not for long. While most seniors and pre-retirees are focused on preserving Social Security, few care about the significant cuts proposed for Medicaid. No matter how it is accomplished, i.e. direct cut or transferring the obligation to the states, this ship has sailed.
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Old 11-15-2011, 10:20 AM
 
701 posts, read 1,532,735 times
Reputation: 792
Quote:
Originally Posted by lenora View Post
Not for long. While most seniors and pre-retirees are focused on preserving Social Security, few care about the significant cuts proposed for Medicaid. No matter how it is accomplished, i.e. direct cut or transferring the obligation to the states, this ship has sailed.
Right you are.

Even as we speak, Medicaid funding is being cut for all sorts of medical care.

Don't hear much about cuts for long-term care, but that's bound to be part of it as Medicaid picks up 43 percent of all spending on long-term care services including services to support those who are living in the community.

Medicaid&rsquo;s Long-Term Care Users: Spending Patterns Across Institutional and Community-based Settings - Kaiser Family Foundation
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Old 11-15-2011, 11:07 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,991,724 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by PatRoy1 View Post
Right you are.

Even as we speak, Medicaid funding is being cut for all sorts of medical care.

Don't hear much about cuts for long-term care, but that's bound to be part of it as Medicaid picks up 43 percent of all spending on long-term care services including services to support those who are living in the community.

Medicaid&rsquo;s Long-Term Care Users: Spending Patterns Across Institutional and Community-based Settings - Kaiser Family Foundation
That does it. I'm turning my house into a nursing home, converting the garage for bunk beds (the spryest seniors get the top bunks ). We'll just hire a cook and a per diem nurse to come by for a group check. We'll ship our laundry home to our family members and hire a van to take us places. I'll only charge $1000/month, less if we have more of us.
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