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Old 11-18-2011, 09:43 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,751,136 times
Reputation: 32309

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
Which means that 44 have lower taxes!
Yes, that conclusion did not escape me at all. I was making the point that so often California is considered the worst state of all for taxes, but it is actually not. Certainly you do not think I am so stupid as to believe Calif. is a low-tax state?
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Old 11-18-2011, 11:55 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,628 posts, read 39,998,659 times
Reputation: 23780
Quote:
Originally Posted by mlb View Post
Winters are hell in Wyoming.
But summer is NICE (that one day of it )

Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
.... Hxx, humid weather is unknown in Wyoming. ...

What's the difference between Wyoming and Heaven?

You have to be dead to go to Heaven
.
^^^ That is very good.. ... I too would be HOME in WY (Powell) if I was the only voice in the family. Burgess Jct is Heaven to me!!

I would take WY winters over my current 280 days of incessant drizzle (120" worth).

I SHALL RETURN, tho maybe not in this life, (I will allow my ashes to fall in a creek up in the Bighorns).

IIRC, there is a state 'old-folks-home' on the site of the Hot Springs park in Thermopolis... That will do when I'm senile (any day now... or maybe it was yesterday) Wyoming Pioneer Home ... sounds welcoming to me, and a good spot to soak away the winter.
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Old 11-19-2011, 05:33 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,988,950 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Yes, that conclusion did not escape me at all. I was making the point that so often California is considered the worst state of all for taxes, but it is actually not. Certainly you do not think I am so stupid as to believe Calif. is a low-tax state?
It's funny, those of us on the East Coast automatically think of California as a really expensive state to live in. And it is in several major aspects--buying property, renting property, and commodities like car gas. However I'm amazed that people like my sister and other relatives who live there, while in expensive homes, pay property tax on par with or less than here. So if you've already bought and/or paid off your place, other than auto it's probably equal or less in cost to living here. If I were attracted to CA as a place to live, I'd consider it.
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Old 11-19-2011, 07:25 AM
 
Location: Prospect, KY
5,288 posts, read 17,967,262 times
Reputation: 6544
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
It's funny, those of us on the East Coast automatically think of California as a really expensive state to live in. And it is in several major aspects--buying property, renting property, and commodities like car gas. However I'm amazed that people like my sister and other relatives who live there, while in expensive homes, pay property tax on par with or less than here. So if you've already bought and/or paid off your place, other than auto it's probably equal or less in cost to living here. If I were attracted to CA as a place to live, I'd consider it.
\

Well, I disagree with you. As I have stated before - the house we sold almost 3 1/2 years ago in So. Cal was a modest but completely renovated home - 1700 sq. ft. - $600,000 selling price....our taxes were about $2100 a year but the people who bought our house are paying just under $10,000 a year. Now had we stayed in that house, our taxes would be lower than where we relocated to - but to relocate to California and not be protected by the in-place tax laws - no way would I recommend that to someone who is retiring unless they had a very good income.

Sales tax is more expensive in California than a host of other states. Tax incentives for retirees are basically non-existent in California. Gasoline, utilities, the price of groceries, the price of everyday things like haircuts are sooo much more in California than many other places.

The bottom line: It will cost you a bundle to live in a decent place in California. Sure, if you are willing to live in a sub-par neighborhood, if you are frugal and don't own a car and don't run your heater in the winter and eat beans for dinner every night - yes, you might be able to eke out a living there.

I lived in California for over 50 years - very expensive!
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Old 11-19-2011, 07:27 AM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,502,154 times
Reputation: 29076
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Yes, that conclusion did not escape me at all. I was making the point that so often California is considered the worst state of all for taxes, but it is actually not. Certainly you do not think I am so stupid as to believe Calif. is a low-tax state?
Not at all. I posted the distinction for those with glazed-over eyeballs who may be mathematically challenged!
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Old 11-19-2011, 07:41 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,988,950 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cattknap View Post
\

Well, I disagree with you. As I have stated before - the house we sold almost 3 1/2 years ago in So. Cal was a modest but completely renovated home - 1700 sq. ft. - $600,000 selling price....our taxes were about $2100 a year but the people who bought our house are paying just under $10,000 a year. Now had we stayed in that house, our taxes would be lower than where we relocated to - but to relocate to California and not be protected by the in-place tax laws - no way would I recommend that to someone who is retiring unless they had a very good income.

Sales tax is more expensive in California than a host of other states. Tax incentives for retirees are basically non-existent in California. Gasoline, utilities, the price of groceries, the price of everyday things like haircuts are sooo much more in California than many other places.

The bottom line: It will cost you a bundle to live in a decent place in California. Sure, if you are willing to live in a sub-par neighborhood, if you are frugal and don't own a car and don't run your heater in the winter and eat beans for dinner every night - yes, you might be able to eke out a living there.

I lived in California for over 50 years - very expensive!
OK, I'll take it from the "horse's mouth"! You ought to know. I am only going on impressions, largely uninformed of the realities of living in CA. All I really do know is how expensive it is to live here, even with no sales tax on food. I'm not interested in the West Coast for a number of reasons, and so will deal with the unpleasantries of rising taxes in my homeland.

BTW, why did the prop tax on your CA home rise so unbelievably high for the new owners???
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Old 11-19-2011, 07:43 AM
 
2 posts, read 1,826 times
Reputation: 10
I'm new to this forum so I apologize if this is redundant. I am retired & live in the sunny south (16 yrs). My youth was spent in NJ/DelMarVa area and my adulthood in NH which I consider my home. After 25 yrs there I couldn't handle the winters any more and went south. Now I am retired and am as uncomfortable w/summers here as I was w/winters in NH. Am arranging to snowbird for a while as I have good friends in both places, but there will come a time when that will no longer work or I may not take to that kind of split lifestyle, so I am still searching for the ideal place to live.
From what I've read, I agree with most of the posted considerations...4 moderate seasons w/out terrible humidity, reasonable taxes, property expenses, etc. little or no crime, good services (hospitals, public trans in a city, etc), and friendly folks. Along with that, I require a liberal atmosphere and minimal religious proselytizing (there are more churches than retail stores here) and LGBT acceptance. Lots of creative and artistic endeavors would also be a plus. Ideally I'd like to live in the rural outskirts of a city/town w/ a pop 20,000 more or less. A real plus would be a place where there is an older lesbian community. In the right environment I have a lot to contribute, but in the wrong one I become a hermit. Any suggestions?
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Old 11-19-2011, 08:05 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,988,950 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by boreda68 View Post
I'm new to this forum so I apologize if this is redundant. I am retired & live in the sunny south (16 yrs). My youth was spent in NJ/DelMarVa area and my adulthood in NH which I consider my home. After 25 yrs there I couldn't handle the winters any more and went south. Now I am retired and am as uncomfortable w/summers here as I was w/winters in NH. Am arranging to snowbird for a while as I have good friends in both places, but there will come a time when that will no longer work or I may not take to that kind of split lifestyle, so I am still searching for the ideal place to live.
From what I've read, I agree with most of the posted considerations...4 moderate seasons w/out terrible humidity, reasonable taxes, property expenses, etc. little or no crime, good services (hospitals, public trans in a city, etc), and friendly folks. Along with that, I require a liberal atmosphere and minimal religious proselytizing (there are more churches than retail stores here) and LGBT acceptance. Lots of creative and artistic endeavors would also be a plus. Ideally I'd like to live in the rural outskirts of a city/town w/ a pop 20,000 more or less. A real plus would be a place where there is an older lesbian community. In the right environment I have a lot to contribute, but in the wrong one I become a hermit. Any suggestions?
If you can tolerate the winters in New England, the best places for LGBT are the Valley of Western MA (the Five College area, notably Northampton home of Smith College), Boston, Portland ME, and Vermont.

You'd have to be OK with the heating season being Nov-March & April, sometimes May. That is a big drawback to living in the north. And many summer days can get pretty hot/humid, though not as bad as the South. Also look into Ann Arbor/twin cities and towns around Chicago.
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Old 11-19-2011, 08:11 AM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,502,154 times
Reputation: 29076
Quote:
Originally Posted by boreda68 View Post
I'm new to this forum so I apologize if this is redundant. I am retired & live in the sunny south (16 yrs). My youth was spent in NJ/DelMarVa area and my adulthood in NH which I consider my home. After 25 yrs there I couldn't handle the winters any more and went south. Now I am retired and am as uncomfortable w/summers here as I was w/winters in NH. Am arranging to snowbird for a while as I have good friends in both places, but there will come a time when that will no longer work or I may not take to that kind of split lifestyle, so I am still searching for the ideal place to live.
From what I've read, I agree with most of the posted considerations...4 moderate seasons w/out terrible humidity, reasonable taxes, property expenses, etc. little or no crime, good services (hospitals, public trans in a city, etc), and friendly folks. Along with that, I require a liberal atmosphere and minimal religious proselytizing (there are more churches than retail stores here) and LGBT acceptance. Lots of creative and artistic endeavors would also be a plus. Ideally I'd like to live in the rural outskirts of a city/town w/ a pop 20,000 more or less. A real plus would be a place where there is an older lesbian community. In the right environment I have a lot to contribute, but in the wrong one I become a hermit. Any suggestions?
Eureka Springs, AR!
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Old 11-19-2011, 08:44 AM
Status: "Support the Mining Law of 1872" (set 13 days ago)
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,584 posts, read 10,936,973 times
Reputation: 19234
Quote:
Originally Posted by boreda68 View Post
I'm new to this forum so I apologize if this is redundant. I am retired & live in the sunny south (16 yrs). My youth was spent in NJ/DelMarVa area and my adulthood in NH which I consider my home. After 25 yrs there I couldn't handle the winters any more and went south. Now I am retired and am as uncomfortable w/summers here as I was w/winters in NH. Am arranging to snowbird for a while as I have good friends in both places, but there will come a time when that will no longer work or I may not take to that kind of split lifestyle, so I am still searching for the ideal place to live.
From what I've read, I agree with most of the posted considerations...4 moderate seasons w/out terrible humidity, reasonable taxes, property expenses, etc. little or no crime, good services (hospitals, public trans in a city, etc), and friendly folks. Along with that, I require a liberal atmosphere and minimal religious proselytizing (there are more churches than retail stores here) and LGBT acceptance. Lots of creative and artistic endeavors would also be a plus. Ideally I'd like to live in the rural outskirts of a city/town w/ a pop 20,000 more or less. A real plus would be a place where there is an older lesbian community. In the right environment I have a lot to contribute, but in the wrong one I become a hermit. Any suggestions?
From what you wrote the Denver area should be perfect for you. The weather is the best in the country. I lived there for thirty years; then the liberals ran me out.

Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
If you can tolerate the winters in New England, the best places for LGBT are the Valley of Western MA (the Five College area, notably Northampton home of Smith College), Boston, Portland ME, and Vermont.

You'd have to be OK with the heating season being Nov-March & April, sometimes May. That is a big drawback to living in the north. And many summer days can get pretty hot/humid, though not as bad as the South. Also look into Ann Arbor/twin cities and towns around Chicago.
Chicago winters are bitter cold, the summers hot and humid. Natives and long term residents are extraordinarily provincial. It's not liberal. but rather uninformed partisan.
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