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Old 11-19-2011, 10:33 AM
 
Location: Prospect, KY
5,288 posts, read 17,974,515 times
Reputation: 6544

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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
OK, I'll take it from the "horse's mouth"! You ought to know. I am only going on impressions, largely uninformed of the realities of living in CA. All I really do know is how expensive it is to live here, even with no sales tax on food. I'm not interested in the West Coast for a number of reasons, and so will deal with the unpleasantries of rising taxes in my homeland.

BTW, why did the prop tax on your CA home rise so unbelievably high for the new owners???
Our California property taxes were protected from skyrocketing under Prop.
13 - here is the info.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Califor...ition_13_(1978)
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Old 11-19-2011, 10:43 AM
mlb
 
Location: North Monterey County
3,196 posts, read 2,865,272 times
Reputation: 4901
Yup, newenglandgirl.

My sister pays $1200 in property taxes (pre Prop 13) for her Los Altos, CA (the flats not the "Hills") home. Her neighbors - original owners - sold - and the new owners pay upwards of 15K a year in property taxes.

It's incentive to stay - but local services are hugely expensive because most everyone else is paying the higher property taxes.
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Old 11-19-2011, 11:03 AM
 
9,224 posts, read 9,295,009 times
Reputation: 28918
Quote:
What's the difference between Wyoming and Heaven?

You have to be dead to go to Heaven.
My mother grew up in Kemmerer, Wyoming. Living next door in Utah and traveling throughout Wyoming with some frequency, I feel I'm qualified to at least give an opinion about the state.

I'll stay away from the comments you made about guns, gays, and politics. I suspect we don't see eye to eye.

What I will comment on are several things:

The Negatives

1. The high altitude of most of the state. Its not well suited for anyone with heart problems or lung problems. Additionally, a fair number of Wyomingites smoke. Second hand smoke may be more of an issue in public places than elsewhere. Even if they have a law against smoking indoors, my observation is that it is mostly ignored.

2. The wind blows like crazy in much of the state. Most Wyoming cities lie in areas that are not surrounded by mountains or natural wind breaks.

3. Winters tend to be long and hard.

4. There is little cultural or intellectual life in the state. Its too small and diverse to support that.

5. There are no professional football, baseball, or basketball teams. Though if you live around Cheyenne, Denver is less than a 100 miles south.

6. There is limited medical care available because of the dearth of big cities. I suspect medical care in Cheyenne and Casper is adequate. I'm not so sure about the rest of the state. (Although, one time someone told me how many physicians there were in a little place like Lander and I was astonished)

The Positives

1. Few people live there. If you want to live in a section of the country where you definitely won't feel "hemmed in" than Wyoming is that place.

2. The Northwest Corner of the state is the location of Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks. There is no better place you could be in the summer. Jackson Hole, on the way to Grand Teton, is a crazy, but fun place to visit in the summer.

3. I don't believe any other state offers public fishing grounds for the exclusive use of Wyoming citizens and residents. Wyoming is a paradise for a fisherman or a hunter.

4. Wyomingites are generally friendly and helpful people.

5. Taxes are low. However, the major reason they are low is because the state has abundant mineral resources for which it earns royalties from energy extraction companies.

I gave some thought to trying to have a place in Wyoming that we could live in the summer. However, come October, I'd want to head south.

I actually think Wyoming might be a better place to raise a family than it is to retire. All our situations are different though. I could see that a healthy elderly person particularly between ages 62 and 70 could be quite comfortable there. I had an uncle who lived in a small town in Wyoming until he was 90 years old. Than he finally decided it was better to move closer to good medical care in a big city. He lived another eight years. Quite a man, he was.

Last edited by markg91359; 11-19-2011 at 11:34 AM..
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Old 11-19-2011, 11:12 AM
 
Location: Oxygen Ln. AZ
9,321 posts, read 16,594,478 times
Reputation: 5692
We pay $700 a year for a 1,800 square foot home in Sun City. Taxes just depend on where you are in AZ. We fled CA due to business and property taxes.
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Old 11-19-2011, 11:15 AM
 
Location: Virginia
18,717 posts, read 26,935,396 times
Reputation: 42862
Two places with 4 seasons and strong LGBT community (or so I hear): Asheville, NC and Rehoboth Beach, DE.
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Old 11-19-2011, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Oxygen Ln. AZ
9,321 posts, read 16,594,478 times
Reputation: 5692
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
Interesting link. What it has to do with homes or AZ is beyond me...

Oh, no thanks. I spent a year in Phoenix and I'll pass on that for the rest of my time on this planet.
Sorry about the link. For anyone interested in AZ the link for the 55+ development I mentioned is: Shea Homes Trilogy | Retirement Communities | New Homes for Active Adults
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Old 11-19-2011, 02:07 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 19,001,270 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by MotleyCrew View Post
Sorry about the link. For anyone interested in AZ the link for the 55+ development I mentioned is: Shea Homes Trilogy | Retirement Communities | New Homes for Active Adults
That is so not my style.

Thanks anyway...

P.S. There is an important word in the title of this thread...
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Old 11-19-2011, 02:43 PM
mlb
 
Location: North Monterey County
3,196 posts, read 2,865,272 times
Reputation: 4901
Quote:
Originally Posted by markg91359 View Post
My mother grew up in Kemmerer, Wyoming. Living next door in Utah and traveling throughout Wyoming with some frequency, I feel I'm qualified to at least give an opinion about the state.

I actually think Wyoming might be a better place to raise a family than it is to retire. All our situations are different though. I could see that a healthy elderly person particularly between ages 62 and 70 could be quite comfortable there. I had an uncle who lived in a small town in Wyoming until he was 90 years old. Than he finally decided it was better to move closer to good medical care in a big city. He lived another eight years. Quite a man, he was.

I, too, live "next door" in Utah - and have had many occasion to visit the Yellowstone/Jackson Hole area - and have former co-workers who live up there (they have money)....but yes, only part of the year. They also have digs here in Utah - and go back and forth. Nice to be able to do that - pick and choose your seasons.

I also have a coworker/friend who grew up there (in Casper, WY - matter of fact she went to the same highschool as Dick Cheney).... and she couldn't run away faster. She still has family up there and they are pleading for her to retire there. No way. The isolation from any sort of civilization is deafening....the winds are a constant. And, she says, the minds are small. You have to like/love non-stimulation.

As for raising a family - kids don't know any different and maybe the experience would be good. But isolation is not a good thing for kids, either.

You'd be better off choosing a college community like Billings or Bozeman, MT - I've heard great things about both of those places.
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Old 11-19-2011, 02:51 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,763,041 times
Reputation: 32309
Default Hyperbole

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cattknap View Post
\

Well, I disagree with you. As I have stated before - the house we sold almost 3 1/2 years ago in So. Cal was a modest but completely renovated home - 1700 sq. ft. - $600,000 selling price....our taxes were about $2100 a year but the people who bought our house are paying just under $10,000 a year. Now had we stayed in that house, our taxes would be lower than where we relocated to - but to relocate to California and not be protected by the in-place tax laws - no way would I recommend that to someone who is retiring unless they had a very good income.

Sales tax is more expensive in California than a host of other states. Tax incentives for retirees are basically non-existent in California. Gasoline, utilities, the price of groceries, the price of everyday things like haircuts are sooo much more in California than many other places.

The bottom line: It will cost you a bundle to live in a decent place in California. Sure, if you are willing to live in a sub-par neighborhood, if you are frugal and don't own a car and don't run your heater in the winter and eat beans for dinner every night - yes, you might be able to eke out a living there. I lived in California for over 50 years - very expensive!
Lots of hyperbole in the above post. I have also lived in California for a long time (48 years) and I still do. California is a big state, so big that you might as well talk about the cost of living in the United States. Things like groceries and haircuts are really no more expensive than anywhere else - and yes, I travel quite a bit and buy groceries and meals in other states. Within walking distance of my townhouse there are three or four hair places where the price of a haircut varies from $8 to $15. And that is not in a "sub-par" neighborhood, but in a clean, safe, middle class area.

Did you live in the San Fransisco Bay area? If so, that would explain your post. That is an outrageously expensive area, especially for the cost of housing. In Los Angeles, there are certain chi-chi neighborhoods that are also quite expensive, and there are also clean, safe, nice areas that are much more reasonable, and there are also "sub-par" areas.

Gasoline is, like you say, more expensive in California because the environmental controls are stricter, but we are talking about perhaps 20 or 30 cents per gallon more. Unless you drive a whole lot, that is just negligible.

In California, you don't have to "not run your heater in the winter" to have reasonable utility bills because (unless you live in the mountains) the winters are so mild that we run our heaters just a small amount. Ususally we have a few light frosts overnight every year, but last winter I don't remember a single one.

You must think that every neighborhood that is not in a chi-chi area is "sub-par" but that is absolutely untrue. People read posts like yours and come away with a skewed view of what it's like to live in California, cost-wise. Pay close attention to what I have been saying. I am not claiming that California is a low cost-of-living state. In many other states there is indeed a lower cost-of-living, and also lower taxes. I am just trying to correct your over-wrought exaggerations.
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Old 11-19-2011, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Arizona
419 posts, read 658,724 times
Reputation: 862
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
That is so not my style.

Thanks anyway...

P.S. There is an important word in the title of this thread...
Agreed!
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