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Old 11-19-2011, 05:10 PM
 
6,990 posts, read 6,985,767 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
Obviously not a secret but no need to "publish" exactly where. It meets our needs and we (not just us) welcome any who love it for what it is and don't care to "import" outside influences and society into it.

Glad you love where you are. That's all that counts!

But, unless you grew up there, YOU are an outside influence!!!
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Old 11-19-2011, 05:45 PM
Status: "Support the Mining Law of 1872" (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,571 posts, read 10,917,875 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Yes let's get back to affordable places to grow old...
Affordable for whom? Affordable with respect to what sort of standard of living? It seems from the various posts that just about everyplace is affordable to the average individual who has made some provisions for the future. I think that almost all of of us could agree (I know that there are a few who disagree with everything on principle) that there are at least many choices available.

Quote:
Originally Posted by markg91359 View Post
The Negatives


4. There is little cultural or intellectual life in the state. Its too small and diverse to support that.

5. There are no professional football, baseball, or basketball teams. Though if you live around Cheyenne, Denver is less than a 100 miles south.
Those seem to me to be antithetical qualities. But just as the Great Unwashed can use electronic means to live their vicarious lives so too can the cultured classes use electronics as well as time-honored print to satisfy their interests.

Cultural and intellectual activities are of interest only to a small segment of the population. For example, apart from textbooks, 10% of people purchase 90% of all books published. Apart from students, few use libraries. That's why libraries constantly try to market their services other than books. Reading is fundamental to culture.
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Old 11-19-2011, 07:16 PM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,475,774 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by staywarm2 View Post

But, unless you grew up there, YOU are an outside influence!!!
Only if you want to consider and identify yourself as one. Some of us have the desire and capacity to meld right in.
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Old 11-19-2011, 08:50 PM
 
26,589 posts, read 52,277,138 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mlb View Post
Yup, newenglandgirl.

My sister pays $1200 in property taxes (pre Prop 13) for her Los Altos, CA (the flats not the "Hills") home. Her neighbors - original owners - sold - and the new owners pay upwards of 15K a year in property taxes.

It's incentive to stay - but local services are hugely expensive because most everyone else is paying the higher property taxes.
I bought my home from the family that built it in 1956... they paid $1200 in tax the year I bought and my bill went to $9,000 based on my purchase price...

I hope to be just like them after 50 years of ownership

It is not as much as an incentive to stay in a particular home as one would think... later propositions allow seniors to downsize without incurring a huge new assessment... especially, if they stay in the same county.
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Old 11-19-2011, 09:02 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,732,288 times
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Default Affordability is indeed relative.

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Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
Affordable for whom? Affordable with respect to what sort of standard of living? It seems from the various posts that just about everyplace is affordable to the average individual who has made some provisions for the future. I think that almost all of of us could agree (I know that there are a few who disagree with everything on principle) that there are at least many choices available.
You've hit on one of the problem areas in this sort of discussion. Just about all adjectives except dead and pregnant are relative, so we have to specify quite closely what we mean. For example, if we mean a single person is trying to live on the average monthly Social Security benefit alone, that was $1,168 as of December, 2009. That would be one extreme of affordability and I don't see how those people do it. The maximum Social Security retirement benefit for a person who is taking it at age 66 in 2010 is $2,346 per month, which is almost exactly twice as much, so that would be one large step up. There are all gradations in between those two, and upward beyond the SS max.

However, there is another aspect of affordability which is even more problematic, it seems to me, and that is talking about different states as if there were not enormous variations within the states. Large states like Texas and California come to mind but most other states are large enough to have these wide variations too. I'm sure even Rhode Island has different neighborhoods in which the cost of housing differs. To me, discussing different metro areas makes more sense than discussing different states. We all know that some metro areas are just horrendously expensive - New York City, Washington D.C., and San Fransisco come to mind. So let's take Virginia; if you live in Virginia close enough to commute to work in D.C., that is an entirely different animal than living further away. (One big assumption I am making here is that housing is the largest single factor in cost of living, and the cost of housing includes property taxes).

So affordability is relative and that is one reason these discussions meander and break down.
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Old 11-20-2011, 12:45 PM
 
28,237 posts, read 39,884,966 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
You've hit on one of the problem areas in this sort of discussion. Just about all adjectives except dead and pregnant are relative, so we have to specify quite closely what we mean. For example, if we mean a single person is trying to live on the average monthly Social Security benefit alone, that was $1,168 as of December, 2009. That would be one extreme of affordability and I don't see how those people do it. The maximum Social Security retirement benefit for a person who is taking it at age 66 in 2010 is $2,346 per month, which is almost exactly twice as much, so that would be one large step up. There are all gradations in between those two, and upward beyond the SS max.

However, there is another aspect of affordability which is even more problematic, it seems to me, and that is talking about different states as if there were not enormous variations within the states. Large states like Texas and California come to mind but most other states are large enough to have these wide variations too. I'm sure even Rhode Island has different neighborhoods in which the cost of housing differs. To me, discussing different metro areas makes more sense than discussing different states. We all know that some metro areas are just horrendously expensive - New York City, Washington D.C., and San Fransisco come to mind. So let's take Virginia; if you live in Virginia close enough to commute to work in D.C., that is an entirely different animal than living further away. (One big assumption I am making here is that housing is the largest single factor in cost of living, and the cost of housing includes property taxes).

So affordability is relative and that is one reason these discussions meander and break down.
On the money, so to speak.

Even something as simple as distance to amenities can be a show stopper. If you like to live in the country and are on a tight budget, getting to the store, dentist, doctor, etc can be an expense that is draining, and gas is not going to get less expensive over the long haul.
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Old 11-20-2011, 07:17 PM
 
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Default Distance to Stores, Docs, etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
On the money, so to speak.

Even something as simple as distance to amenities can be a show stopper. If you like to live in the country and are on a tight budget, getting to the store, dentist, doctor, etc can be an expense that is draining, and gas is not going to get less expensive over the long haul.
Also, as people age, they may no longer be able to drive and taxis into town can get quite expensive.
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Old 11-21-2011, 06:32 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,971,705 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
On the money, so to speak.

Even something as simple as distance to amenities can be a show stopper. If you like to live in the country and are on a tight budget, getting to the store, dentist, doctor, etc can be an expense that is draining, and gas is not going to get less expensive over the long haul.
Besides suitable housing that the average senior can afford, senior transportation is the by far the largest challenge for the aging. Our parents' generation generally had their adult kids living reasonably close by, who would drive their aged parent to doctors and markets. Our lifestyle has changed dramatically in a generation, with adult kids very rarely living that close. A lot of oldsters who have no business driving due to serious health problems are still driving, but many who are not have to depend on senior vans to get them around. With the budget cuts in nearly every city and town, how long will this service last??

I chose a college town with not only senior transport but public transport and inter-campus transport. When I have to give up driving I'll have some way of getting around. I'm within walking distance to a supermarket, hardware store, dunkin donuts, bank, etc. The things that are not "perfect" here are balanced out by the amenities of my location.

I have two very elderly friends who live considerably rural. They should NOT be driving, but they have to...in and out of town to doctors and markets several times a week. How long can they manage this, in all seasons and all kinds of weather? They are beginning to get frail. If they cannot sell their homes due to the economy, and if they must do this in order to get into assisted living, etc, what then?

Seems like our "planners" were still operating on the suburban lifestyle/young families model and never foresaw the future.
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Old 11-21-2011, 07:44 AM
 
Location: Oxygen Ln. AZ
9,321 posts, read 16,577,349 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Besides suitable housing that the average senior can afford, senior transportation is the by far the largest challenge for the aging. Our parents' generation generally had their adult kids living reasonably close by, who would drive their aged parent to doctors and markets. Our lifestyle has changed dramatically in a generation, with adult kids very rarely living that close. A lot of oldsters who have no business driving due to serious health problems are still driving, but many who are not have to depend on senior vans to get them around. With the budget cuts in nearly every city and town, how long will this service last??

I chose a college town with not only senior transport but public transport and inter-campus transport. When I have to give up driving I'll have some way of getting around. I'm within walking distance to a supermarket, hardware store, dunkin donuts, bank, etc. The things that are not "perfect" here are balanced out by the amenities of my location.

I have two very elderly friends who live considerably rural. They should NOT be driving, but they have to...in and out of town to doctors and markets several times a week. How long can they manage this, in all seasons and all kinds of weather? They are beginning to get frail. If they cannot sell their homes due to the economy, and if they must do this in order to get into assisted living, etc, what then?

Seems like our "planners" were still operating on the suburban lifestyle/young families model and never foresaw the future.
I do believe that Del Webb was the Disney of retirement developments back when he started the first ever 55 + community here in AZ. We have shopping right up the street, doctors are but 5 min away and several outstanding hospitals. I see the shuttle van picking up some of the single elderly around now and then. You can find a spot that works and I agree that rural living is out of the picture now. As for your elderly, frail friends, should they go into an assisted living center, the state will take all their assets to offset the cost of care...at least in some states.
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Old 11-23-2011, 09:39 AM
 
701 posts, read 1,531,246 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MotleyCrew View Post
As for your elderly, frail friends, should they go into an assisted living center, the state will take all their assets to offset the cost of care...at least in some states.
Usually the requirement is that you "spend down" all assets to a couple thousand dollars. You can keep your home, I believe. I guess this in case you rally and need a place to move back to, I guess. However, the state will likely put a lien on your home to recover the cost of your care after you pass over.

The kicker is that while Medicaid will pick up the tab for Skilled Nursing Facility, and for Assisted/Supportive Living if your income is under about $1600 or so, in nearly all states, or so I've been told, if your income is over $1600 and you do not require nursing care such as would be provided in a SNF, you are on your own.
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