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Old 10-04-2011, 10:01 PM
 
5,090 posts, read 13,552,001 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Hey LC, what were your Five F's again?
I cannot remember all the pedantic philosophy that I wrote. I am like Socrates as I need a Plato to expound on my diatribes against the accepted ideas of living.

So I had to do a search and here is that post from 6/09:

"...I do not totally believe that it is a good idea to resettle in a new area for retirement. If one has spend their whole lives in an area. The Familiarity, Friends, Family, Food, and Feel of the area means more as you are old. Oh, I just made this up: the five "Fs" of retirement..."

Retiring on a literal shoestring: support group

I do not know how you can remember it as I have long forgot what I wrote.

Livecontent
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Old 10-04-2011, 11:09 PM
 
Location: Nebraska
4,178 posts, read 9,420,641 times
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1. Niceness of the area, aesthetically

We chose a spot with rolling hills, lots of grass, few trees. Dry, rarely humid. Rivers and lakes to go swimming, fishing, and even ice fishing in. Lots of open land, lots of wildlife, no ordinances (my favorite quote from the local Town Board {145 pop} "We think we had some ordinances once, but we don't know where we put them". We have four glorious seasons and no one comes here except in the short summer tourist season or to go hunting.

2. Driveability (traffic factor, distance factor)

We are NOT driveable, nor did we want to be. We are 38 miles from groceries, doctors, and 'amenities' - we have a gas station, bar, garage, hardware store, and feed store in town. Wal Mart is 150 miles away, as is the closest interstate, as is the closest Trauma I center.
We have really good roads when they are not occluded by ice and snow; they are usually clear the day after the next blizzard, and very driveable.


3. Ease in access to basics: supermarket, library, P.O., stores, entertainment
Our PO is right in town, in walking distance (3 blocks). Most stores are 38 miles away, as is the library, except as noted above.

4. Quality of medical facilities and senior living options
The tiny hospital and clinics 38 miles from us are very high quality. A full yearly checkup (including bloodwork, paps. and x-rays) is $175, with results available the next day.

5. Affordable (all things considered, all kinds of taxes) for retirees of modest income, say $50K or under/year.

Although people complain about the "high taxes" here, we pay exactly the same on a 2,000 sq foot farmhouse and 60 acres that we used to pay back east on a 1,000 sq foot home on 1/3 of an acre. Housing and food are comparable. Animal care is incredibly cheap - My Afghan hound got a cactus spine in her foot that became infected. The doc brought her in, did surgery, kept her overnight, and gave us 10 days of antibiotics - all for $40. My DH trades woodwork, metalwork, and fiberglas work and repairs on small engines for animal hay, food, wood for the woodstove, and other considerations. We trade eggs for, as well as grow, our own produce. We raise our own cattle and hunt deer and turkey in abundance. We don't 'do' much entertainment; there are locally produced melodramas and plays, cowboy poetry, song festivals, arts and crafts, 'smokers' (BBQ with gaming afterwards), potluck suppers, prime rib dinners, rodeos, and public picnics, etc all around us. People leave us alone and we leave them alone, for the most part, aside from our business dealings and the local events. We make less than $35,000 a year and are very comfortable, doing what we love to do. There is low crime - we all leave our doors unlocked, windows open, and our keys in the vehicles.

Something I think you skimmed over is political and social climate. Here, everyone open-carries and no one cares. Folks are strictly honest or no one deals with them; they passively 'shun' them. Children don't wear their pants around their knees, say "yes sir" and "no mam" and don't intrude on adult conversations. There is no vandalism - any kid who tries it is eventally caught (his peers turn him in)and made to clean it up, with his parents paying for the supplies. Private property doesn't need to be posted - it is sacred, and anyone who violates it is dealt with. Public property is taken care of by voluntary groups, from the American Legion to the school kids to the Cemetery Board.

I'm with Curmudgeon, though - don't think you can come here and change it to suit. They'll smile and wave - and ignore you.
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Old 10-05-2011, 01:55 AM
 
Location: Tri-Cities, Washington - Wine Country
19 posts, read 22,520 times
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I myself like this Tri-Cities area in South East Washington. We are on the other side of the mountians so don't get the rain or humidity that Seattle gets. We have 335 days of sunshine each year and the goft courses are open all year. We get all 4 seasons - even a couple of cold days and a little bit of snow that melts the next day. Springtime is nice and warm, summer can be hotish....we had one day of 100; the rest is an avg of about 88 which isn't too bad. Autumn all the trees in the 3 cities turn and it is beautiful, all colors. Basically it is very mild here and livable.

It is a well kept set of cities and is kept clean. Everywhere you go there are parks, ponds, rivers, beautiful bridges over our 3 rivers (Yakima, Columbia and Snake)

Between 5am and 7am the site workers are on the road - but whose up that early anyway? The site workers are coming home between 4pm to 6pm, so it is best to not go out at these times. But all 3 cites are connectly by cleverly placed freeways. It only take 15 -25 minutes to get anywhere from one city to the furthest.

Each city has it's own post offices, grocery stores, etc. and we have tons of entertainment all over all the time; especially in summer. We have a great farmers markets in Richland and Pasco.

We have a few major hosptials and Physicians Immediate Care as well as doctors offices

It is as affordable as you need it, from lower cost apts/condos to med size houses, living centers, senior living centers, To nice homes on the golf courses.

It is a decent place to live. - it's worth a look. If you're interested, contact the Tri-Cities Chamber of Commerce and they can send you informational booklets free of charge.

We have over 200 wineries in our area and each has it's own venue, some just do a little bit of tasting, others have entertainment and dinners to taste the wine, othere only have a wine bar. So it depends on what you want.

We have a great growing seaon and grow everything under the sun.

Crime is not bad here at all.

That's what I go


1. Niceness of the area, aesthetically
2. Driveability (traffic factor, distance factor)
3. Ease in access to basics: supermarket, library, P.O., stores, entertainment
4. Quality of medical facilities and senior living options
5. Affordable (all things considered, all kinds of taxes) for retirees of modest income, say $50K or under/year
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Old 10-05-2011, 03:23 AM
 
Location: Prospect, KY
5,288 posts, read 17,965,185 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Did you say somewhere why you chose Kentucky out of all the possibilities? (I'm always interested in why a Californian would choose to retire in the Midwest, as Curmudgeon has done).
We knew as my husband's retirement date neared that we wanted out of So. California - the traffic, crime, expense, politics, dirty air, etc, etc. We had originally planned to move to Williamsburg, VA but then visited friends in Prospect, KY - we fell in love, plain and simple, with this beautiful place.

We put our house up for sale and in 3 weeks, we received 4 offers and sold it for the asking price. My husband's retirement party was the day before the movers came. The next day we drove across the U.S. to Kentucky visiting relatives along the way. When we arrived in KY, through connections with friends, we met a man who was thinking about selling his home but hadn't put his house up for sale. We bought the house a day after we arrived - it was the first house we looked at in the neighborhood we wanted to live in....things have continued to just fall into place here - we were meant to be here.
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Old 10-05-2011, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Verde Valley AZ
8,621 posts, read 9,689,321 times
Reputation: 10995
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Like many, I'm tired of seeing these "Best Places to Retire" annual lists written up by leading mainstream money magazines, with recommendations that seem pretty far-fetched to me.

I also see a lot of assumptions about places that may not be true across the board--such as California and New England are unaffordable. As some point out, in specific places some things are pricey and other things are not, balancing out the question of "affordability."

Many things are more objective, such as quality of medical facilities, things to do for seniors, kinds of housing available.

The one thing that is definitely subjective is "affordability." What is easily affordable for one may not be easily, or at all, affordable for another.

IMO, the best recommendations are from those on the ground, those actually living in or at least knowing a place very well firsthand.

If we were to stick to 5 simple questions, based on your living there (current or recently) how would you rate your recommendation for where to grow old? (Please don't list where not to.)

1. Niceness of the area, aesthetically
2. Driveability (traffic factor, distance factor)
3. Ease in access to basics: supermarket, library, P.O., stores, entertainment
4. Quality of medical facilities and senior living options
5. Affordable (all things considered, all kinds of taxes) for retirees of modest income, say $50K or under/year

Looking forward to responses.
I guess I know my area "very well firsthand", since I've lived here...off and on...for the past 67 years! lol It's always been a good place to live, to me. I've seen a LOT of changes over the years but nothing I can't live with.

I live in a beautiful place, in a valley that's a really nice 'greenbelt' area. We have LOTS of green here, two rivers, mountains, desert...that's also green!...and, of course the beautiful Red Rocks area. It's a great place for people who truly enjoy the outdoors and being out in it. And for people who like to garden it's a great place. My garden lasts from May to Oct. and is prolific!

We are the major shopping hub for the entire valley so the traffic does sometimes get a little 'hairy' but it's not bad at all. It's a small town and I can get from one end of town to the other in less than ten minutes. Takes me exactly 7 minutes to get to work, 3 miles away...depending on traffic lights, of course...but most of the things I have to do are within a mile or so.

We have several grocery stores, banks, drug stores and a gazillion other businesses a mile away and it's easy to get around town. The library is 4 blocks away, the post office is the same as are the city and county offices.

We have an excellant hospital and a ton of doctors/specialists in the area all covering about a 1 mile area, pretty much all together. We have quite a few assisted living places, senior housing and nursing homes. Plenty of apt. complexes, all very affordable and averaging around $500-600 month.

I think it's a very affordable place to live. I live on way less than $50,000 a year and do just fine. I pay all my bills, living expenses and 'other stuff' and still manage to save a fair amount. I expect I'll live here till the day I die and it's okay with me.
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Old 10-05-2011, 11:12 AM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,508 posts, read 62,217,072 times
Reputation: 32199
Quote:
Originally Posted by livecontent View Post

"...I do not totally believe that it is a good idea to resettle in a new area for retirement. If one has spend their whole lives in an area. The Familiarity, Friends, Family, Food, and Feel of the area means more as you are old. Oh, I just made this up: the five "Fs" of retirement..."
and how much to weigh each of these (or any other factor)...
can depend on WHEN you're facing the question.

By that a choice made while a more robust late 50something empty-nester anticipating 30 or even 40 more years to be in that spot will weigh many of these differently than will the more frail 75yo.
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Old 10-05-2011, 12:11 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,622 posts, read 39,986,663 times
Reputation: 23775
Best Affordable Places to Grow Old: Our Own Survey

I have seen the stats that OK is the least expensive when it comes to 'assisted' care levels and higher. I don't think it ranks to high on your criteria, but when I'm 'infirmed' the environmental niceties will be minimal requirements, I just have a prepaid shipping directive to send me to a small OK farm town with a nice community owned carecenter. (with a strong roof)
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Old 10-05-2011, 12:22 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,966,925 times
Reputation: 18050
Try USPS box;if you fit you ship .
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Old 10-05-2011, 02:07 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
13,890 posts, read 25,335,938 times
Reputation: 26388
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Like many, I'm tired of seeing these "Best Places to Retire" annual lists written up by leading mainstream money magazines, with recommendations that seem pretty far-fetched to me.

I also see a lot of assumptions about places that may not be true across the board--such as California and New England are unaffordable. As some point out, in specific places some things are pricey and other things are not, balancing out the question of "affordability."

Many things are more objective, such as quality of medical facilities, things to do for seniors, kinds of housing available.

The one thing that is definitely subjective is "affordability." What is easily affordable for one may not be easily, or at all, affordable for another.

IMO, the best recommendations are from those on the ground, those actually living in or at least knowing a place very well firsthand.

If we were to stick to 5 simple questions, based on your living there (current or recently) how would you rate your recommendation for where to grow old? (Please don't list where not to.)

1. Niceness of the area, aesthetically
2. Driveability (traffic factor, distance factor)
3. Ease in access to basics: supermarket, library, P.O., stores, entertainment
4. Quality of medical facilities and senior living options
5. Affordable (all things considered, all kinds of taxes) for retirees of modest income, say $50K or under/year

Looking forward to responses.
I picked Las Vegas. I traveled a lot and looked, but I always came back to Las Vegas. I love it here! I even looked at other countries but the idea of not being able to work scared me.

1. Niceness of the area, aesthetically. It's not Green Mansions, but if you like high desert, it's beautiful here. There are at least 6 National Parks in easy driving distance and a lot of interesting places to explore. Part of the year, you can ski in the mountains and come down to the valley to swim. It's too hot for about 8 weeks in the summer and the tradeoff is no snow to shovel. People from all over the world come to see Las Vegas and there's a lot to look at. There's always something new to see and for a small city, the best of everything is available and we have a world class international airport so it's easy to go as well. We mostly have desert landscaping. Xeriscape that conserves water so yard work is a little raking and a gallon of roundup every year. We don't have much severe weather of any kind. Every type of entertainment you could possibly want is here.

2. Driveability (traffic factor, distance factor) It's a small city and you can drive anywhere in 30 minutes, usually less. We are a town of shiftworkers and we do have rush hour, it's just a little more stretched out. Traffic on the Strip is horrendous but it's all tourists, locals seldom go there. We avoid it. Construction season goes on all year here and there's always road work. Las Vegas is a 'newer' city and most of the roads are wide and designed to carry a lot of traffic. Compared to many other cities, there is no traffic here at all. Car insurance is expensive here and you have to drive defensively at all times. The roads are full of awestruck, lost tourists and impaired drivers. There is plenty of free parking everywhere.

3. Ease in access to basics: supermarket, library, P.O., stores, entertainment All of these things are within walking distance from my house. Even Starbucks and a library! That was one of my criteria, it had to be walkable. For a small city, the bus system is pretty good here. And we have a jillion taxi's 24X7. But it is too hot here to walk much or rely on public transportation about 8 weeks out of the year. Other than that, no problem.

4. Quality of medical facilities and senior living options Luckily, I am basically healthy so I have little first hand experience. But the consensus is we fall short in the healthcare department. I hear people complain about the quality of healthcare here but we do have several large hospitals and a trauma center. There's a clinic of some kind on every other corner. Here's a joke that's been around for a long time. Question: "Where do you go for healthcare in Las Vegas?" Answer: "The airport." Is this true? I'm not sure but people do complain and if I had complex medical conditions that required a lot of treatment, I would do a lot of investigating to be certain what I needed was available here. Senior living is no problem. Las Vegas has been a popular retirement place for years and everything you could want/need is here.

5. Affordable (all things considered, all kinds of taxes) for retirees of modest income, say $50K or under/year THIS is where Las Vegas shines like gold in the desert. You can have a great life here for little money. Property taxes are low and there is no state income tax. Pensions are not taxed either. Vegas is expensive for tourists, not locals. One thing you have to remember, most of the workers here are in low pay, service type jobs. Prices have to stay low here or the workers can't afford to stay. Housing, since the crash, is cheap, cheap, cheap. I would buy some rental properties if I could afford it. Part time, low pay, jobs aren't that hard to get if you want a little supplemental income or something to do. Finding a job that pays a living wage is a totally different animal. Discounts for locals, and seniors, abound. You just have to ask. You can eat out here for less than almost anywhere in the country. Where else can you get a prime rib(12 oz) dinner for $5.99? You can sign up on several websites for free or heavily discounted show tickets. You can do, and go, and have a lot of fun on the cheap here. Most of us don't sit in front of the TV. There's too much to do. Groceries are reasonable here too. We have lots of inexpensive ethnic markets as well.

I can think of three things that are too expensive here. Car registration(on newer cars) and insurance, and electricity. You can fight back by driving an older car because they don't deteriorate as fast here, no snow, salt, slush, on the roads. My registration runs $80 per year and I pay $400 per year for insurance. Most people pay much more. I set my thermostat on 80 in the summer. It's hard but it doesn't last forever. Most of the rest of the year, the windows are open.

Money wise, Las Vegas is a great value.
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Old 10-05-2011, 02:18 PM
 
5,090 posts, read 13,552,001 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
and how much to weigh each of these (or any other factor)...
can depend on WHEN you're facing the question.

By that a choice made while a more robust late 50something empty-nester anticipating 30 or even 40 more years to be in that spot will weigh many of these differently than will the more frail 75yo.
You are very correct. It is also depends if one is the late "50something" who is a fairly new transplant to the area because of a job transfer or one is a "native" who has grown up in the area. The transplant would view leaving as just another move while the native would "weigh" it much more heavily because he has invested the time to establish a sense of place. I believe that the sense of place, that is familiarity and a comfort in your environment of the 5Fs which I noted, is very important to many people.

Both of these types have different established freedoms. The constant "mover" has the freedom with no attachments to place and has no qualms about moving. The "native" has the freedom of satisfied wants and desires with the known sense of place.

Problems do arise in relationship where one spouse is the "mover" and the other is the "native". So some "natives" will only choice other of the same for their mate, and "movers" will seek out only their counterpart. Unfortunately we cannot always aim cupid's arrow

Livecontent
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