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Old 12-09-2011, 02:00 AM
 
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I thought Section 8 vouchers were state-specific?
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Old 12-12-2011, 07:32 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Nuclear lab???
More like an American version of a Russian "closed city" - actually quite nice, everyone is well-behaved lest they lose security clearance, they make good money, kids, if they have them, are usually well raised.

Los Alamos proper is up on the mesa, can be a bit isolated (well, it was originally *intended* to be isolated).

Give me nuclear over most fossil fuel operations.
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Old 12-15-2011, 01:10 PM
 
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Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Good idea, but isn't this Tornado Alley?
Scared of tornados?

I've lived in Texas for 60 years. I've seen exactly ONE tornado in my whole life. And that was when I was driving through Tennessee about 35 years ago.
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Old 12-15-2011, 04:51 PM
 
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Tornadoes are selective. Wherever they go they selectively ravage that particular area. 1/2 mile away you might be in a thunderstorm.

The key is to not be in the path if one does come. Sometimes that's not so easy.

I have lived in tornado alley my entire life. I've seen dozens and sat through two. Not a fun thing, but if you're prudent and have a good place to hunker down, you'll survive. Personally, I'll take tornadoes over an earthquake any day.
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Old 12-15-2011, 05:22 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
Tornadoes are selective. ...The key is to not be in the path if one does come. Sometimes that's not so easy.

... Personally, I'll take tornadoes over an earthquake any day.
All my predecessors living through many tornadoes close-by, (across the road...) but none ever struck the 'homeplace... (pioneer homestead). There are several good ways to survive a tornado (metal structure in garage was most recent I saw), on the farm we had a 'cave'.

But Volcanos... (currently less than 40 miles from St Helens, and similar distance to Mt Hood). The whole Cascade Range is pretty active (as far as volcanos go)

Seems mother nature packs a mighty big punch.

I feel pretty good about avoiding floods (1200 ft above the Columbia River). BUT the insurance agent forces me to buy flood insurance. (How will I ever collect?, he is at 50 ft above the Columbia River ft)

I will be subject to typhoons if I retire to an island in Asia Pacific to get access to affordable healthcare.
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Old 12-16-2011, 01:08 PM
 
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Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
If you can get a section 8 voucher, I think you can go anywhere in the USA.
HUD is a federal program and in theory you have the right to transfer your Section 8 voucher to any HUD program in the country. This is called "porting" as I recall.

There is a fair amount of paperwork, naturally, and it depends on whether the HUD program you are moving to will accept vouchers "ported in." They can also bill your current office. Of course, this depends on whether your current office will agree to this.

Years ago, people from Chicago (where the wait was somewhere around seventeen years, or so I was told) would come to Minnesota where the wait for vouchers, particularly in January and February, was relatively brief. Sometimes a person could get a voucher within weeks. Then they would "port" the voucher back to Chicago.

My understanding is that over the years, this became more difficult to do. Someone with current knowledge would be a better source of information.
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Old 12-16-2011, 01:31 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
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I have a 'retired' client who is very distressed about going under section 8. She will have to give up her 2 bdrm 'familiar place' and move to a small single (even tho she frequently has 2 grown children living with her (yet a bigger problem). Her landlord offered to do the section 8, but only has 2 bdrm, of which she doesn't qualify (single), Then there is the issue of the state finding out grown kids are living there... no more food stamps (considers potential "HOUSEHOLD" income, of which free-loading / criminal kids have ZERO, but are considered CAPABLE to contribute to family needs. (They certainly help contribute on the 'Expense Side' )
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Old 12-17-2011, 07:04 AM
 
Location: Virginia
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I have to admit, although I think Section 8 and other assistance programs are wonderful things, my husband would be under distress if I suggested going that route. I guess we feel we've been fortunate in life, and these programs are meant for people who haven't been as fortunate. I don't want to feel greedy (even though it means we probably can't be near the beach in California). It's ok, we can find other good places to retire that aren't as pricey.
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Old 12-17-2011, 08:13 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 19,040,770 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caladium View Post
I have to admit, although I think Section 8 and other assistance programs are wonderful things, my husband would be under distress if I suggested going that route. I guess we feel we've been fortunate in life, and these programs are meant for people who haven't been as fortunate. I don't want to feel greedy (even though it means we probably can't be near the beach in California). It's ok, we can find other good places to retire that aren't as pricey.
Like me, you probably would not qualify for Section 8. However, in income-based senior housing programs, we would qualify (there are income limits, but these seem to be pretty high). In these programs, you pay 30% of your income whatever that income is. So you would not be paying for your apt. what your neighbor is paying. That said, yes, in accepting an income-based unit you would be taking priority over someone else who could need it more.
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Old 12-17-2011, 11:08 AM
 
Location: California Mountains
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
However, in income-based senior housing programs, we would qualify (there are income limits, but these seem to be pretty high). In these programs, you pay 30% of your income whatever that income is. So you would not be paying for your apt. what your neighbor is paying. That said, yes, in accepting an income-based unit you would be taking priority over someone else who could need it more.
In most tax-credit housing, you pay whatever the rent is determined because it is already decided as low enough. Only the Section 8 recipients pay the 30% of their income, while the rest of the tenants pay the listed (higher but still low when comparing with the market) rent.

The rents showed on the list I posted are what everyone pays except Section 8 recipients.

Tax-credit housing is not always permanently affordable housing. The companies who built these places signed the contract with the local or state government to provide lower rent to lower income seniors or families, but only for a certain numbers of years. After the contract is expired, the companies have the option of renewing and continuing with the tax break, or renting them out as regular apartments with much higher rent, or converting them in to condo complexes and selling it at market price. That's the reason the locations of many of these complexes are very desirable. Great locations do not bring more rent when tenants are income restricted, so why bother? Because of the huge rental or selling price later, that's why.

The helping hand, therefore, are going both ways. Low-income seniors are not the only people who benefit by the service. In actuality, the companies benefit a great deal more from the government to build and operate a complex at lower cost. All they have to do is staying with it until the end of the contract, during which time they should have recovered their cost, then they can reap greater profits by selling or renting to deeper pocket tenants.

Many of these companies have been in the program for more than half of a century. They built several housing complexes with tax-credit, stayed within the required years, sold them, built more complexes with tax-credit. Lather, rinse, repeat.

The way I see it, low income seniors are very small and temporary beneficiaries in this program. I have not lived in a low-income housing yet, but I imagine my distress would not be great when I consider myself nothing but one of many small tools that the companies are using to get to their greater rewards. Maybe my feeling would change once I find myself smack dab in the middle of the new situation, but as of right now, I am okay with it.

Last edited by Ol' Wanderer; 12-17-2011 at 11:33 AM..
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