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Old 10-13-2011, 01:34 AM
 
Location: Bay Area, CA
29,041 posts, read 45,034,695 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gypsychic View Post
I feel exactly the same way. I am a woman, so definitely NOT a male thing. If something happened to my sweet husband, and money was tight I would rather move into the smallest place possible rather than take on roommates.

Plus, I have been a landlord, and those were the worst years of my life. I can't even imagine what hell it would be if a renter was actually LIVING with me. This, of course, is only my view and I'm sure many do it and it works out for them.
I used to feel the same way, and lived alone for a good 8-9 years when I was in a cheaper area... then I came back to the Bay, and had no choice but to find a roommate. I have a 40lb dog and 3 cats, so going into a studio just wasn't an option - and my job being in San Francisco (until recently), only a studio would have worked financially for me to live alone. So I bit the bullet & found roomies to share a 3br house, and it worked out rather nicely for the next few years. During that time I had 5 different roommates, and only one of them was ever a problem. And he was totally reliable in terms of finances, we just had some major personality clashes!

Anyway, it's not always the easiest situation, but financially and company-wise it can really be a good thing. You just have to be somewhat flexible, and learn to share space without invading their space.
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Old 10-13-2011, 02:12 AM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,487,261 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gizmo980 View Post
You just have to be somewhat flexible, and learn to share space without invading their space...
...or live, work or retire some place affordable that meets your wants and needs and permits your total independence. Then it becomes a matter of choice rather than need.
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Old 10-13-2011, 10:15 AM
 
Location: Verde Valley AZ
8,618 posts, read 9,682,513 times
Reputation: 10965
[quote=newenglandgirl;21251401]Gizmo, great post, lots of sound advice~~

Curmudgeon, I wonder if it's a male thing to not want to have housemate(s) in older years....are men more set in their ways perhaps, and women more "communal"? Just wondering....[/quote]


Maybe, maybe not. I'm a female and I do NOT want to get into a room mate situation. I'm too 'set in my ways' and have had my own personal space much too long to even BEGIN 'negotiating' with someone about it. I wouldn't even want my best friend as a room mate because I know she would drive me bonkers in record time. lol I don't feel any great need for companionship, don't need the money and like things just as they are.
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Old 10-13-2011, 11:22 AM
 
Location: Bar Harbor, ME
1,922 posts, read 3,779,855 times
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I would think of taking on a nice 25 year old blond housemate, but I suspect my 60 year old wife of 38 years would object strongly.

But both of us have thought that maybe we could take on 2- 21 year old female college students as housemates in our house as we get a bit older. They would actually be borders, and would only be asked to pay rent and heat and hot water costs.

In addition to providing some addition income, they might be "there for us" to call help if either of us had a fall or something.
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Old 10-13-2011, 03:01 PM
 
2,740 posts, read 724,299 times
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There is a program here in Atlanta that puts young people in older people's houses as housemates. They are screened carefully. I believe the younger people have to pay a small room and board fee, but not as much as would be on the open market. Supposedly is a win-win situation for both young and old.
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Old 10-13-2011, 03:07 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,978,143 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gypsychic View Post
I feel exactly the same way. I am a woman, so definitely NOT a male thing. If something happened to my sweet husband, and money was tight I would rather move into the smallest place possible rather than take on roommates.

Plus, I have been a landlord, and those were the worst years of my life. I can't even imagine what hell it would be if a renter was actually LIVING with me. This, of course, is only my view and I'm sure many do it and it works out for them.
I think I'm being convinced that the housemate idea is not a good idea.
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Old 10-13-2011, 03:09 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,978,143 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zarathu View Post
I would think of taking on a nice 25 year old blond housemate, but I suspect my 60 year old wife of 38 years would object strongly.

But both of us have thought that maybe we could take on 2- 21 year old female college students as housemates in our house as we get a bit older. They would actually be borders, and would only be asked to pay rent and heat and hot water costs.

In addition to providing some addition income, they might be "there for us" to call help if either of us had a fall or something.
I think your wife would prefer two 40-year-old men. You, know, help around the house and all....
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Old 10-13-2011, 03:34 PM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,497 posts, read 62,167,040 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
I think I'm being convinced that the housemate idea is not a good idea.
maybe from the other direction?
Someone you know otherwise who you get along with...
---

Getting back to that last thread....
creating a separate studio or in-law apartment makes more sense
if the costs of making that separate space aren't prohibitive.
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Old 10-13-2011, 05:01 PM
 
570 posts, read 1,144,908 times
Reputation: 745
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zarathu View Post
I would think of taking on a nice 25 year old blond housemate, but I suspect my 60 year old wife of 38 years would object strongly.

But both of us have thought that maybe we could take on 2- 21 year old female college students as housemates in our house as we get a bit older. They would actually be borders, and would only be asked to pay rent and heat and hot water costs.

In addition to providing some addition income, they might be "there for us" to call help if either of us had a fall or something.
This is a nice idea for you and for the students you would take in. Personally, I worry about when my daughter starts college and wants her own apartment. I would be far less resistant to it if she had this type of living arrangement, and wouldn't worry so much about her safety. Sounds like a mutually beneficial arrangement.
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Old 10-13-2011, 07:06 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
14,242 posts, read 44,919,845 times
Reputation: 12828
Very difficult to "vet" people that might make a good room-mate or not. If you have someone who has run of your house, you have to be able to trust them at least to some extent.

By and large I would prefer to do something other than become a "jackleg" landlord for extra cash if I need it. For example (living on a 13-acre property) I could rent out a parking space for someone's RV if they wanted to do that.

I actually had a guy with a bus converted to an RV who stayed at our place for a few months. He was already a good friend, we made it a point to respect each other's boundaries, it worked out well for a while. I forget exactly why he decided to move on, but we parted as friends, he works in a different town a few hundred miles away so I don't see him much.

The only "complicated" part of our deal was that he was on the house (yard) electric distribution with no separate metering. We squared that circle by him footing whatever the electric bill exceeded last year's same month bill (had them on file) when he was not there. This of course required him to trust *me* not to waste power in the house and pass the bill on to him.

But at the end of the day we were not going to argue over 10 or 20 bucks a month. It was a cheap place for him to live, and some extra cash for me.

If someone wanted to, they could look for a house or even apartment that's set up to have 2 or more independent living spaces, if they thought taking on a boarder would be needed.

Final thought - I would be more OK with B&B people than a long-term room mate, somehow I don't think of B&B customers stealing or damaging things - could be wrong though.
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