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Old 10-21-2011, 08:58 PM
 
5,090 posts, read 13,540,747 times
Reputation: 6928

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Quote:
Originally Posted by SelflessGene View Post
1. Yes, I was responding to it while you were writing this one.

2. That was an ironic aside, not a demographic analysis.

3. Who thinks that? The ultimate beneficiaries of federally-subsidized housing are the property owners. Social policy is not their concern, making money is. I've had this confirmed by every owner I've contacted in Detroit and elsewhere.

Hey, isn't it interesting that we both came up with the dead horse metaphore independently and concurrently?
You seem to ignore the issue that many subsidized housing is provided by a municipality or a non-profit organization with roots in the community. These operations have the motives to serve their people in their area.

Even with profit operation which accept subsidized applicants, the daily operations are run by people in the community and they will have prejudices against an outsider entering the area, demanding benefits, when there is a waiting line for the units.

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Livecontent

Last edited by Sam I Am; 07-29-2012 at 04:31 AM.. Reason: unnecessary -debate the idea, okay?/"You keep chasing your own tail which is on top of beating that dead horse. "
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Old 10-22-2011, 09:38 AM
 
Location: Paradise Lost
291 posts, read 409,746 times
Reputation: 207
Default Fact vs. Theory

Quote:
Originally Posted by livecontent View Post
1. You seem to ignore the issue that many subsidized housing is provided by a municipality or a non-profit organization with roots in the community. These operations have the motives to serve their people in their area.

2. Even with profit operation which accept subsidized applicants, the daily operations are run by people in the community and they will have prejudices against an outsider entering the area, demanding benefits, when there is a waiting line for the units.

3. You keep chasing your own tail which is on top of beating that dead horse. Just realize it is a people business which can operate many ways in and out of regulations and the law.
1. Your theories about how this all works are contradicted by almost every discussion I've had with actual owners and agents. With the two acceptions of the place in Detroit that wanted a Michigan ID and the place in Rochester that wanted a locally-obtained police report (which may or may not be examples of your version of reality) everyone in a decision-making position that I've talked to has welcomed the idea of out-of-state applicants and assured me that this presents no problems - including using my Florida ID. (Hell, they're even willing to pay the postage to send me an application.) Sorry, but to my way of thinking, empirical evidence always trumps people's opinions. If I come across verifiable instances of residency requirements then I'll make that information public.

2. I only contact places with current vacancies (which I assume they are eager to fill). I'm not interested in getting on a waiting list. None of the many front-line people I've spoken to have exhibited any prejudice against non-local applicants. Even in the Detroit case they were apologetic about the ID rule and expressed sincere regret that it would prevent me from applying. They did not treat me as someone "demanding benefits" but simply as a potential renter. I'm beginning to wonder if you have any actual experience with this subject or are simply posing as an expert in a field you know little or nothing about. The longer you continue to issue these proclamations the less convincing you become.

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Last edited by Sam I Am; 07-29-2012 at 04:31 AM.. Reason: orphaned - but don't tell another poster to go elsewhere
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Old 10-22-2011, 10:19 AM
 
5,090 posts, read 13,540,747 times
Reputation: 6928
The "truth in the pudding". Talking and talking about getting subsidized housing and criticizing my points is not getting you housing--has it? I am no expert but I have done research. You just keep going on about this and that, upset about answer you get from the some housing folks. The issue is that you do not have housing and that is what you need to get. Wasting your time arguing with other poster is not going to achieve your goal. So, some clerk gave you sympathy--big deal--that did not get you housing.

As you said "empirical evidence always trumps people's opinions" and the evidence is that you do not have housing, so get it and stop whinning, complaining, arguing, talking, posting--just do it. You appear that you have the information you need.
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Livecontent

Last edited by Sam I Am; 07-29-2012 at 04:32 AM.. Reason: knock it off
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Old 10-22-2011, 10:41 AM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,463,318 times
Reputation: 29071
Quote:
Originally Posted by livecontent View Post
As you said "empirical evidence always trumps people's opinions" and the evidence is that you do not have housing, so get it and stop whinning, complaining, arguing, talking, posting--just do it. You appear that you have the information you need.

My current post turned to overbearing and blunt because I started to see your wimpering--it can be characterized as "tough love". You have got as much as you can get from this forum and my help has ended. So, go out and do what you need to do. I wish you sincere luck.

Livecontent


Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
I think the thread is a very useful one for many seniors, with options and info that they have never heard about before. The facts and experiences that everyone brings to the table are good; it would just help if we can say "we heard such and such" vs. "we read such and such" (and where). Of course, with any thread, readers have to be willing to sort through facts from opinions. It's like the SS thread, with lots of great info but a lot of misconceptions and mis-info. IMO, the time that everyone has put in on this thread is not wasted, but very apropo to the retiring boomer generation.

...I hope the moderator will not close the thread in the Retirement forum.


You can lead a horse to water...
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Old 10-22-2011, 02:42 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,964,817 times
Reputation: 15649
What I am learning, as I read about this subject, are some recurring points:

1. You do not have to be destitute or "poor" to live in many subsidized housing units. There appears to be less stigma about senior subsidized housing than I originally thought. You either meet the financial guidelines, or you don't. Apparently seniors of all kinds, from spouses who perhaps never worked to those who had professions but no pensions or other big income upon retirement. I wouldn't be surprised to find retired teachers, but I might be surprised to find retired doctors, as you know, the higher income folks would never need this or even meet the financial requirements.

2. There is an income ceiling, calculated from the total of each person in the household. Income includes that from all revenue-producing assets, including investments, bank accts, etc. ***[see questions, below]

3. Some of these require a minimum age of 55 ; for others the magic number seems to be 62 for the "head of household" (that's a loaded term!)

4. Some of the housing complexes are for seniors only (age-defined); others split the available units between families and seniors. One may not care about this, or one may want to avoid those with families for a number of reasons.

5. This kind of housing has rules about pets, from none at all, to one cat, to one "small dog" (the lbs. vary greatly, from 25 - 40; if Fido is 45 lbs and you want in, put him on a diet). Ironic, b/c it's often the smallest dogs that are the constant yippers!

6. The waiting lists to get into subs sr housing appear to be from one year to four or more. When your name comes up, you either have to take the unit or go off the list and start all over again. Some complexes appear to allow your house to be yet-unsold when you enter. When you sell your house, the proceeds become a liquid asset to be accounted for in some way - see above.

7. "Section 8" rental assistance - I guess you do have to be "poor" by the federal poverty standards (can be found on the .GOV websites). "Section 8" is a very specific program that falls under "affordable/subsidized senior housing."

I think this might run by a voucher system and one on Section 8 can live anywhere a landlord accepts it. Not sure of this fact, please don't trust it.

A very low-income senior who has a younger adult and child his her/her household will likely look at this program, as the subsidized senior housing generally does not accept younger people in the unit. Or, will look at the family units within the subsidized apt. complexes. This is what I gather; please call for exact info.

-------------

***Questions

1. Countable income--if some of the income is in the form of annual interest earned from term CDs (interest $ that cannot be accessed until the CD matures), I do not know how they handle that, as you can only pay your rent with liquid cash.

2. Apparently (is it some, or all??) of these places add on to the rent something like 1% of the total value of all assets per year--or is this inaccurate information? As several posters have pointed out, getting this info up front is hard to do, it does not appear to be spelled out anywhere, and it's points like these one would want to beware of. Depending on amount of assets, the senior may do much better just renting a fair-market value apartment and conserving his total assets.
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Old 07-28-2012, 07:07 PM
 
1 posts, read 757 times
Reputation: 10
i am recently retired at 62 with social security as only income. The only family i have left is my pet dog Chipper. I can only afford subsidized housing but snce Chipper weighs 38 lbs I can not find housing (via internet searches) that will allow him. I can't give him up. He is all i have. At this point i do not care where I live, any state will do. Two weeks from now i will be homeless. Does anyne know of low income housing that will allow my Chipper?
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Old 07-29-2012, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,964,817 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dogisfamily View Post
i am recently retired at 62 with social security as only income. The only family i have left is my pet dog Chipper. I can only afford subsidized housing but snce Chipper weighs 38 lbs I can not find housing (via internet searches) that will allow him. I can't give him up. He is all i have. At this point i do not care where I live, any state will do. Two weeks from now i will be homeless. Does anyne know of low income housing that will allow my Chipper?
From what I read last year when posting on this thread, many subsidized housing places have a pound limit on pets, like 25 pounds. This is unfair because the little dogs are often the yippers and barkers, and the bigger dogs often more laid back and gentle. Some places say one dog or one cat, but do not mention pound limits. I would go to your nearest senior center or council on aging and make an emergency appointment. They may have access to national resources that list these more lenient places.

Read all this:
http://www.nolo.com/legal-encycloped...hapter4-3.html


Google this:

subsidized senior housing openings allow pets

This is what I found on Georgia, for example: http://www.dca.state.ga.us/housing/r...vp_program.asp
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Old 08-01-2012, 01:44 AM
 
13,313 posts, read 25,542,533 times
Reputation: 20477
Regarding the poster who is needing housing with dog Chipper, how about a small trailer somewhere cheap? It's affordable housing that doesn't have people on top of you or beside you, and many parks would be fine with one smallish dog (38 pounds is smallish, in my dog world). A trailer could be a lot more affordable than an apartment.
I so hope that poster will find something with Chipper.
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Old 09-14-2012, 10:24 AM
 
33,046 posts, read 22,034,672 times
Reputation: 8970
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
I'm rather surprised you didn't receive necessary information and insight in 35 pages of responses to Essential Facts For Low Income Retirees.

Where are they?

(Never mind, I found it...woulda been nice if it has been (grumble) linked.)
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