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Old 10-12-2011, 11:54 AM
 
8,231 posts, read 10,886,830 times
Reputation: 5912
Quote:
Originally Posted by SelflessGene View Post
I will be retiring soon with a small social security benefit as my only income and am interested in the possibility of applying for HUD Section 8 subsidized housing.

I have previously researched the subject of Section 8 vouchers which require that you apply at local housing authority offices at infrequent times and then go on long waiting lists. All over the country most of these lists are currently closed. Yesterday I spoke to someone in a management office of a large mixed income development in upstate NY and discovered that these facilities operate independently of government public housing offices and do what she called "in-house section 8". That is, you apply directly to the facility and they decide if you qualify for a subsidized unit. One such facility had fixed low rents but many others operated on the principle that, if a person qualifies, they pay 30% of their income for rent.

I should add that what I'm looking at here is subsidized housing for "the elderly". Fortunately HUD's definition of "elderly" is 62 and over - the same age at which you can start receiving early social security and thereby demonstate a low fixed income but also one that is guaranteed.

I am interested in hearing from anyone who may have had some personal experience with this type of situation. I emphatically do not want to hear from anyone inclined to argue the politics of subsidized housing. There is a Politics Forum for just this purpose so there is no need to duplicate it here.

In the interest of reciprocity I would like to suggest the following web site for others with similar concerns: Affordable Housing | Low Income Housing | PublicHousing.com . This has been a big help to me in getting started. I am quite willing to share what I've learned with anyone who is sincerely motivated.
I own an 8 unit Project Based HUD apartment building in Cincinnati Ohio and you are correct. People come to us and we run their application through a database provided to us to confirm their income and assets (or lack thereof) and the rents are subsidized based on that means testing. the most anyone pays me is $78 per month. There is a long waiting list for vouchers here and the list has been closed for two years and I can move a person in who has never made an application for housing assistance.
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Old 10-12-2011, 12:27 PM
 
3,169 posts, read 3,234,872 times
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You mentioned you have worked all your life, but your SS check is very low. I would think having worked your whole life that you would be getting a decent size check. I can't imagine having to live on just SS the way things cost today...do you have any family that you could live with? I do wish you all the best...have you looked into being able to get welfare and food stamps?
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Old 10-12-2011, 12:53 PM
 
Location: Hills & Hollers of SW MO
18,287 posts, read 14,436,231 times
Reputation: 15899
Quote:
Originally Posted by SelflessGene View Post
Since you are familiar with the previous thread I'm surprised you didn't notice that this is one is intended to be focused on a very specific topic - the one stated in the title. I've learned my lesson about making the subject so broad that the discussion runs amuck.
And you're quite welcome for the link too! Now let me break out the cheese.
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Old 10-12-2011, 12:59 PM
 
Location: New England
7,038 posts, read 4,497,262 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SelflessGene View Post
Would you mind living in a high-rise like this? I wouldn't.

Andrews Terrace

This is even in my home town that I would dearly love to return to. Thanks for your input.
oooooh, take it! Take it!

I think I would even take a high rise if it looked like that. Mostly around here, the apts aren't in good locations either.

$300 for an apartment in the south or lower midwest. I could afford that on SS but I would be desperately homesick and that matters a lot at this stage of life.
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Old 10-12-2011, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Metropolis IL
668 posts, read 807,444 times
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Maybe I'm wrong, but I would think spending most of adulthood in the workforce, would bring in at least $1000 a month in SS at age 62. Even the SSI folks, without sufficient SS credits, get $674.

(Before anybody starts a lecture, yeah I know SS retirement and SSI are separate programs.)
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Old 10-12-2011, 01:43 PM
 
Location: Paradise Lost
291 posts, read 246,884 times
Reputation: 197
Default The Real Nitty-Gritty

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilson513 View Post
I own an 8 unit Project Based HUD apartment building in Cincinnati Ohio and you are correct. People come to us and we run their application through a database provided to us to confirm their income and assets (or lack thereof) and the rents are subsidized based on that means testing. the most anyone pays me is $78 per month. There is a long waiting list for vouchers here and the list has been closed for two years and I can move a person in who has never made an application for housing assistance.
Just the man I need to speak to. I never expected a response from an owner but I really need to get an owner's perspective on a particular issue.

How important is a credit check to you when a potential tenant is receiving social security? After all it's a guaranteed income for life and can't even be garnished by creditors (accept by the feds and even then the first $750 is exempt). Seems to me that someone on social security would be your safest bet but I'm aware that some folks adhere to the idea that a credit score is the key to a man's soul. Anything you're willing to tell me about this in an open forum?

Anyway, thanks alot. The difference between Section 8 vouchers and "in-house" Section 8 processing is fundamental and not often understood or appreciated.

(I wanted to get this reply out as soon as possible so of course we have a power failure that blows away my cookie and I'm logged out and I can't remember my password and have to figure out how to get a new one ... Whew!)
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Old 10-12-2011, 01:56 PM
 
Location: Paradise Lost
291 posts, read 246,884 times
Reputation: 197
Default Course Correction

Quote:
Originally Posted by loveautumn View Post
You mentioned you have worked all your life, but your SS check is very low. I would think having worked your whole life that you would be getting a decent size check. I can't imagine having to live on just SS the way things cost today...do you have any family that you could live with? I do wish you all the best...have you looked into being able to get welfare and food stamps?
Thank you for your kind concern but please understand that the subject of this thread is not me but "Retirement and Subsidized Housing" as it might apply to anyone in a similar situation. Please, let us not digress.

Last edited by SelflessGene; 10-12-2011 at 02:30 PM..
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Old 10-12-2011, 02:22 PM
 
Location: Paradise Lost
291 posts, read 246,884 times
Reputation: 197
Default Course Correction

Quote:
Originally Posted by BLS2753 View Post
Maybe I'm wrong, but I would think spending most of adulthood in the workforce, would bring in at least $1000 a month in SS at age 62. Even the SSI folks, without sufficient SS credits, get $674.
Your arithmetic is right, your assumptions are wrong. Also, I believe SSI doesn't kick in until you're 65.

Thank you for your kind concern but please understand that the subject of this thread is not me but "Retirement and Subsidized Housing" as it might apply to anyone in a similar situation. Please, let us not digress. I confess that in my reply to your first post I got carried away myself, but I'm going to try to stay on topic from now on.
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Old 10-12-2011, 03:01 PM
 
Location: Hills & Hollers of SW MO
18,287 posts, read 14,436,231 times
Reputation: 15899
Quote:
Originally Posted by SelflessGene View Post
Your arithmetic is right, your assumptions are wrong. Also, I believe SSI doesn't kick in until you're 65.
SSI is Supplemental Security Income for the aged, blind and disabled with limited means. A person can receive it at almost any age for either of the last two qualifiers. However, aged is defined as 65 or over.
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Old 10-12-2011, 03:16 PM
 
4,749 posts, read 8,038,249 times
Reputation: 5855
I have written much on subsidized housing on this forum. This is search result of my posts
http://www.city-data.com/forum/searc...rchid=32332863
I really not trying to blow my own horn but I do not want to repeat myself, because I annoy myself and others.

My main points in my posts are:

1. Find a walkable neighborhood with basic shopping and good public transit.
2. I think High Rises are a better value for construction and security.
3. Regardless what people say about waiting list--it is people business and if you make a good impression, many rules are bent and you will be put ahead on many lists.
4. There are many types of housing from faith base to public housing to new developments that are required to provide subsidized housing because of government incentives.
5. Not all housing is old, some are very new and modern.
6. There are many other programs other than Sec. 8 depending on States, programs and organizations.
7. Remember you can always change housing locations, depending on demand.
8. If you are willing and able to do research and we do have the tools with the internet, you can find many more options.
9. Do not believe always the first answer you get from any individual person or agency, government or private. Verify, verity and verify. Many people are busy/overworked and want you off the phone. Some people are just not informed correctly on fast changing regulations. Some people are just stupid and lazy.
10. Sometimes a personal visit works wonder. Dress and Behave appropriately. Show that you will be an excellent tenant.
11. Do not lie about assets.
12. Do disclose your disabilities
13. Do minimize pets but none is much better.
14. Sometimes you have to move to a city to be eligible officially or unofficially for their subsidized programs.

I think one of the best sites to find low income housing and applicable subsidies is Search Affordable Housing and Apartments

Good Luck and do not let anyone embarrass you about your minimum resources and disabilities.

Livecontent

Last edited by livecontent; 10-12-2011 at 03:35 PM..
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