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Old 03-15-2008, 01:14 PM
GLS
 
1,985 posts, read 4,845,333 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
My friend's 18 year olds were stumped by a rotary dial telephone. They needed instruction.
Too bad they also weren't hooked to a "party" line. They would have freaked to hear strange people's voices coming back at them before hearing the dial tone.
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Old 03-19-2008, 08:04 PM
 
Location: Two Rivers, Wisconsin
11,722 posts, read 11,540,543 times
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I remember my mom calling from Illinois to upper Michigan to her sister and you'd hear operators calling out the name of the town as the call cleared their area.

I still use a hand held can opener and when I left Illinois my 83 yr. old neighbor still had a rotary phone in her place.

My sister still has the pink Royal typewriter my dad bought her and my sister when they were in high school, I graduated in 65 and I used that portable, too.
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Old 03-27-2008, 12:56 AM
 
34,990 posts, read 34,731,659 times
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My daughter asked me, "How did you rewind a record?"
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Old 03-27-2008, 04:49 AM
 
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We had the first TV on our street and had the whole neighborhood in our living room in the evenings to watch. I remember the ice man with his rubber apron delivering big blocks of ice for the ice box. We canned fruits and vegetables for the winter and made soap from lye and oil. My mother washed clothes with a scrub board in a tub until we got a wringer washer. She was certain I would get my hand caught in it and get rolled flat. We painted and re-roofed our house ourselves. We didn't lock our doors and many people left keys in their car's ignition. Women didn't work outside the home and one pay check was plenty. Cars didn't have air conditioning and everyone drove around with the windows down. It was normal for the bed of a pick-up to be packed with kids and dogs. There were no seat belts, no air bags, but very courteous drivers. We lived in the city but had chickens in the back yard along with an orchard and veg garden. The electric bill was about $5 or $6 and the water bill might have been a dollar. There was no charge for trash pickup. We had a party line telephone with our own "ring". We had prayer and free lunch in schools. Everyone in the neighborhood knew everyone else and kids couldn't get away with much of anything without parents hearing about it. Every family had guns at home and no one ever took them to school. A woman getting pregnant out of wedlock was a deeply shameful thing and hidden from public knowledge. Divorces and law suits were rare. Parents spanked their children when they misbehaved and everyone knew it was right. If you got in touble at school you got "paddled" but the worst was waiting for you when you got home and your Dad got out the belt. Police were respected. Prisons were really rough, hard, bad places to be and no none wanted to be in one. An atheist was not a respected member of society, and I had never even heard of a homosexual. It was not a fathomable concept. Most people didn't have health insurance and doctors weren't that expensive. They came to your house if needed. Auto insurance wasn't mandatory either. I never knew anyone that went bankrupt, and people didn't believe in borrowing money. If you didn't have the money you didn't buy it. It was another world, and as I remember it, a better one..

Last edited by Bideshi; 03-27-2008 at 05:36 AM..
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Old 03-27-2008, 01:05 PM
 
34,990 posts, read 34,731,659 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bideshi View Post
We had the first TV on our street and had the whole neighborhood in our living room in the evenings to watch. I remember the ice man with his rubber apron delivering big blocks of ice for the ice box. We canned fruits and vegetables for the winter and made soap from lye and oil. My mother washed clothes with a scrub board in a tub until we got a wringer washer. She was certain I would get my hand caught in it and get rolled flat. We painted and re-roofed our house ourselves. We didn't lock our doors and many people left keys in their car's ignition. Women didn't work outside the home and one pay check was plenty. Cars didn't have air conditioning and everyone drove around with the windows down. It was normal for the bed of a pick-up to be packed with kids and dogs. There were no seat belts, no air bags, but very courteous drivers. We lived in the city but had chickens in the back yard along with an orchard and veg garden. The electric bill was about $5 or $6 and the water bill might have been a dollar. There was no charge for trash pickup. We had a party line telephone with our own "ring". We had prayer and free lunch in schools. Everyone in the neighborhood knew everyone else and kids couldn't get away with much of anything without parents hearing about it. Every family had guns at home and no one ever took them to school. A woman getting pregnant out of wedlock was a deeply shameful thing and hidden from public knowledge. Divorces and law suits were rare. Parents spanked their children when they misbehaved and everyone knew it was right. If you got in touble at school you got "paddled" but the worst was waiting for you when you got home and your Dad got out the belt. Police were respected. Prisons were really rough, hard, bad places to be and no none wanted to be in one. An atheist was not a respected member of society, and I had never even heard of a homosexual. It was not a fathomable concept. Most people didn't have health insurance and doctors weren't that expensive. They came to your house if needed. Auto insurance wasn't mandatory either. I never knew anyone that went bankrupt, and people didn't believe in borrowing money. If you didn't have the money you didn't buy it. It was another world, and as I remember it, a better one..
Wow, you've nailed it Bideshi. Though I dont remember prayer in school or free lunches, I do remember when lunch went up from 25 cents to .30, and strange new quarters with copper in the center.

Movies implied sex. Violence was impressionistic. Kids' books and movies were NOT sensationalist or traumatic. Kids' television was on Saturday morning. Hang Ten t-shirts were blatant and vulgar.
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Old 03-28-2008, 08:00 PM
 
Location: Clarksville, TN
690 posts, read 2,444,351 times
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I was on a phone party line back in 93-94.

Does anyone remember what the name was of those little drive-up photo cubicles that were located in parking lots? You know, you drove up, turned in your roll of film, then about a week later you drove up to the window and picked up your pictures?
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Old 03-28-2008, 08:34 PM
 
Location: Clarksville, TN
690 posts, read 2,444,351 times
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Ah! A much older friend reminded me..they were called Photomat.
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Old 03-28-2008, 11:14 PM
 
Location: In a delirium
2,588 posts, read 4,942,542 times
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I recall Photomats. Had completely forgotten about them.

I used to answer the telephone for a US agency in a third-world country. When it got busy, I would have to put people on hold. One elderly lady was completely befuddled and asked me where I kept going when I asked her to hold. No matter how hard I tried, I just couldn't get her to understand multiple phone lines. Anyway, I've really enjoyed this thread. I'm just shy of 40, so I'm seeing a little bit of both sides.
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Old 03-28-2008, 11:40 PM
 
Location: Ohio
2,178 posts, read 8,072,249 times
Reputation: 3910
My son lost his wrist watch and I gave him an old one that I had that still worked to use until he got another one. He called 2 days later and said the watch quit working. I asked him if he had wound it up. He said "What do you mean, wind it up"? What I took as common practice totaly baffled him. He had never had a wind up watch before.
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Old 03-28-2008, 11:56 PM
 
Location: Atlanta suburb
4,728 posts, read 9,084,908 times
Reputation: 3463
I remember the milk being delivered twice a week to our house in glass quart bottles. The milkman also had butter and cottage cheese. We would buy butter once in awhile, but usually used lard. If we bought the cottage cheese, we couldn't eat it until my mother used the electic mixer and had to beat milk into the cottage cheese so you could even swallow it! It was dry.

We had a 4 digit party line and always answered with our last name, "Hello, H------s." We walked to school. Buseswere only for the farm kids that lived wayyyy out in the country. It took a half an hour or more to walk to school.

Girls were not allowed to wear slacks to school. It would be unthinkable, unless you had them on under your dress on very cold winter days.

We had a bread man deliver the bread. Sometimes, my dad would spend an extra $.25 and get a box of powdered donuts from him, too.

We didn't have a TV until I was in 4th grade and there were only a few shows on each day. Mercifully, American Bandstand and The Mickey Mouse Show started broadcasting when I was in junior high school.

There were no MacDonald's or Wendy's. The only fast food we could buy was a plate of hot French fries and a cherry coke at the corner drugstore lunch counter. They didn't manufacture cherry coke, the soda jerk just added cherry syrup to your coke! It was a penny extra.

My dad's first new car ever was a 1950 Plymouth when I was 4 years old. The horsehair seats could take the skin right off of the backs of your legs if you weren't wearing long pants. We could sit on the inside of the steering wheel and turn it back and forth for a silly ride (ignition off, of course!)

My dad and mom built our house. I mean they built it. My uncle had a bulldozer and rough dug the basement when I was in 2nd grade. Two of my uncles helped Dad frame the house and get the roof on. My mom and dad did the rest - plumbing, heating, electric, everything except for the pine kitchen cabinets and the phone hook-up. I still remember my mother upstairs in the little Cape Cod house nailing down the pine strip flooring while my dad worked on the flooring downstairs. The total bill for the house was $5000.00 dollars and $400 for the acre lot. It took them two yrs. of working on the house every night after getting home from work and all day Saturday. Sunday was for church only - no working on Sundays.

We sold that 54 year old house last spring after my folks died. I wish I could have bought it myself. What memories. Some new young family sure has a wonderful sturdy home now.

Isn't it nice that we remember how things were when we were young? It makes everything such a wonder now.

Last edited by gemkeeper; 03-29-2008 at 12:01 AM.. Reason: Added my last thought before it was gone forever!!
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