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Old 03-29-2008, 12:10 AM
 
Location: Clarksville, TN
690 posts, read 2,446,075 times
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I am "only" 43 but I can remember the milk bottles outside the front door. That would have to have been about 1969. I have never heard of a bread deliveryman before. That is pretty cool. I enjoy hearing people's stories of how things used to be. I miss having these kinds of talks with my father who is now passed away.

Does anyone remember fruit-float? Grandma always had some in her fridge. It was like fruit cocktail mixed in with pudding and it came in a can.
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Old 03-29-2008, 01:07 AM
 
Location: Ohio
2,178 posts, read 8,082,540 times
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The milk and bread delivery trucks reminded me of something else. There used to be a potato chip factory close to where we lived. Dad knew one of the workers there who made deliveries and every once in a great while the man would drop off a large tin pail of chips. The pail had a sealed liner in it to protect the chips. Dad paid him of course, but I will never forget those chips. Most of the time they were still slightly warm. Talk about fresh made. Best chips I ever ate. I don't know what has changed but no chips I buy today comes close to tasting as good as those did. As soon as the truck left the driveway all the neighbor kids were banging on the door. They were always welcome. There were plenty of chips to go around.
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Old 03-29-2008, 07:06 AM
 
34,990 posts, read 34,759,065 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gemkeeper View Post
We had a 4 digit party line and always answered with our last name, "Hello, H------s."
In my parents' hometown in the Midwest there was only one phone exchange until the 1980s. "What's your number?" "3421." (I'm sure they had to dial the exchange first however.)
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Old 03-29-2008, 10:00 PM
 
Location: Atlanta suburb
4,728 posts, read 9,090,595 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robhu View Post
The milk and bread delivery trucks reminded me of something else. There used to be a potato chip factory close to where we lived. Dad knew one of the workers there who made deliveries and every once in a great while the man would drop off a large tin pail of chips. The pail had a sealed liner in it to protect the chips. Dad paid him of course, but I will never forget those chips. Most of the time they were still slightly warm. Talk about fresh made. Best chips I ever ate. I don't know what has changed but no chips I buy today comes close to tasting as good as those did. As soon as the truck left the driveway all the neighbor kids were banging on the door. They were always welcome. There were plenty of chips to go around.
Maybe, you're thinking of Charles Chips in the yellowish and brown can. We had the Charles Chip delivery man come around about every 2 or 3 weeks. You could set up any schedule you wanted with him. The can was about 24 inches tall and about 14 inches in diameter. In fact, I still own one that I put chocolate chip cookies in for the holidays! Two bucks a can. Delicious chips and they were our primary snack for all 5 of us. Otherwise, we snacked on saltines, graham crackers or an apple.

But, chips were allowed only on Friday and Saturday nights while we listened to Amos and Andy, My Little Mama, Hoppalong Cassidy and other radio shows before bedtime. Later, it was watching Lawrence Welk or The Grand Ole Opray and Walt Disney Presents on TV. Special nights.

Of course, who could forget about Sky King, Rin Tin-tin, Gene Autrey, Roy Rogers and Dale Evans, and Lassie! And, boy, all the old movies that we could see on TV. My folks were on cloud nine when they started to show movies from the 30's and 40's with the Marx brothers, Orsen Wells, Claudette Colbert, Tom Mix and on and on.

Delusianne, we had no exchanges yet for our phones. This was in the late 40's, 50's and right up til I went to high school in 1961. Sometime, before I graduated in '64 every one got a 7 digit number. Wow! That was news! We had the same last 4 digits with a 3 digit exchange tacked on the front. Those last 4 digits never changed from 1946 with my folks' first phone until last spring when we had my dad's phone disconnected after his death.
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Old 03-30-2008, 03:05 AM
 
Location: Salt Lake City, Utah
7,731 posts, read 12,196,811 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bideshi View Post
We had the first TV on our street and had the whole neighborhood in our living room in the evenings to watch. I remember the ice man with his rubber apron delivering big blocks of ice for the ice box. We canned fruits and vegetables for the winter and made soap from lye and oil. My mother washed clothes with a scrub board in a tub until we got a wringer washer. She was certain I would get my hand caught in it and get rolled flat. We painted and re-roofed our house ourselves. We didn't lock our doors and many people left keys in their car's ignition. Women didn't work outside the home and one pay check was plenty. Cars didn't have air conditioning and everyone drove around with the windows down. It was normal for the bed of a pick-up to be packed with kids and dogs. There were no seat belts, no air bags, but very courteous drivers. We lived in the city but had chickens in the back yard along with an orchard and veg garden. The electric bill was about $5 or $6 and the water bill might have been a dollar. There was no charge for trash pickup. We had a party line telephone with our own "ring". We had prayer and free lunch in schools. Everyone in the neighborhood knew everyone else and kids couldn't get away with much of anything without parents hearing about it. Every family had guns at home and no one ever took them to school. A woman getting pregnant out of wedlock was a deeply shameful thing and hidden from public knowledge. Divorces and law suits were rare. Parents spanked their children when they misbehaved and everyone knew it was right. If you got in touble at school you got "paddled" but the worst was waiting for you when you got home and your Dad got out the belt. Police were respected. Prisons were really rough, hard, bad places to be and no none wanted to be in one. An atheist was not a respected member of society, and I had never even heard of a homosexual. It was not a fathomable concept. Most people didn't have health insurance and doctors weren't that expensive. They came to your house if needed. Auto insurance wasn't mandatory either. I never knew anyone that went bankrupt, and people didn't believe in borrowing money. If you didn't have the money you didn't buy it. It was another world, and as I remember it, a better one..
Quote:
It was another world, and as I remember it, a better one
You've got that right.
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Old 03-30-2008, 06:10 AM
 
Location: Backwoods of Maine
7,118 posts, read 8,162,030 times
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Post Back To The Future

I wonder how all us kids ever survived to adulthood riding bikes without helmets on? We felt lucky just to have a used bike! How did we ever grow up without riding in child seats in the cars? There weren't even any seat belts! As soon as my brother and I got home from school (walking, of course), we ran out to play (unsupervised) and if we got our mitts on a nickel, why we'd be down to the corner store buying a popsicle or candy bar, which we'd split. And may I add...the candy bars were much bigger than they are today! Also may I add, we didn't get kidnapped!

Everybody had a "family car" - just one. I recall when the first houses were built that had 2-car garages; ours didn't even have a garage. But when Dad stopped for gas, an attendant pumped the gas for him, checked the oil, and cleaned the windshield. Try to get that kind of service today! When Mom wrote out her Christmas cards, there were no zip codes to remember. Aunt Agnes lived in Seekonk, Massachusetts and Mom didn't need a cell phone or BlackBerry to look up the zip. Life was less hectic.

And it may be again. These posts about youngsters not being able to fathom a wind-up watch or a hand can-opener - what will they do if there is ever a prolonged black-out? Am I alone in thinking that could happen? Seems to me that we live in a much more precarious society than we did back then. I for one intend to hang onto my old Timex watches and Swing-Away hand can openers. Nothin' like being able to tell what time it is, or get into that can of Campbell's tomato soup when the power goes down!
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Old 03-30-2008, 08:01 AM
 
Location: Indianapolis Indiana
1,115 posts, read 3,239,877 times
Reputation: 856
An "American Idol" contestant explained last week that he had never heard a Beatle's song. I talked with a sales rep in Circut City a few weeks ago about outdated equipment and she related a story about a guy bringing in an 8 track player for service. Everyone looked and marveled at the relic and a service rep actually fixed it when, after asking the owner, played with it out of curiosity.
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Old 03-30-2008, 11:25 AM
 
13,322 posts, read 25,578,684 times
Reputation: 20520
I wish people's historical memories weren't so much about gadgets. There is so much more to a past time. Will current young people only remember their iPods or TIVO?
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Old 03-31-2008, 10:24 AM
 
Location: Backwoods of Maine
7,118 posts, read 8,162,030 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
I wish people's historical memories weren't so much about gadgets. There is so much more to a past time. Will current young people only remember their iPods or TIVO?

What's a TIVO?
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Old 03-31-2008, 11:05 AM
 
34,990 posts, read 34,759,065 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hapaleeretired View Post
An "American Idol" contestant explained last week that he had never heard a Beatle's song.
SIR Paul McCartney's old band?
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