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Old 11-04-2011, 11:01 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,747,361 times
Reputation: 32309

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
In FL, where my folks had a place I sold after they passed, it was explained to me that unit ownership begins at the level of paint and carpeting. That the walls ceilings floors etc., in essence all aspects of the structure, belonged to the Condo Ass'n. hth
I am a member of the board of directors of a townhouse HOA in California, and my understanding of the situation (which I can't swear to because I'm not a lawyer) is that the exterior of the structure is "owned" by the Association, but the interior of the structure is "owned" by the individual unit owner. At the very least (in case "owned" is not the right word), I do know for certain that the Association is responsible for all repairs and maintenance to the exterior of the structures (roofing, painting, wood rot repairs, etc), while the individual is responsible for all repairs and maintenance to the interior of the unit. If I damage an interior wall, or decide to paint it or paper it, that is entirely up to me. Likewise, I choose the flooring type (carpeting, tile, hardwood, fake wood), which I can change at any time without prior notice or approval. The association only has say-so over the interior in such matters as are required by municipal code for safety, such as the requirement to have a smoke detector on each level and the requirment to have an approved fire door between the garage and the rest of the unit. (In other words, the association has the right to enforce these code requirements because they affect the safety of all, being that the units share common walls side to side.
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Old 11-05-2011, 07:19 AM
 
Location: Lexington, SC
4,281 posts, read 10,743,032 times
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Things can vary state to state and document to document and quite often will vary within the state based on type of construction.

Take a multi unit, multi floor building with say 50 units. Your unit is surrounded by common walls, halls, elevetors, lobby, etc. versus standalone and/or ajoining. Look at it this way. The building is one of common ownership whereas ones unit within the building is private ownership. Also means one maintains the inside of their unit and the common ownership (HOA) maintains all else.

I believe in a NYC type COOP (typically a multi unit, high rise building), one own shares in the COOP but does not actually own their own unit.

I live in a stand alone patio home. I own the land and the home but the HOA is responsible for all the exterior maintenance on my home and land.

As I say. There can be big differences and all should understand that once a "group" decides to throw in together (HOA, Condo Assoc, COOP, etc.), or buys in later....ones personal choices might be limited and some will be chafed under this type living....like no plastic pink flamingos in ones yard....LOL

Our HOA just asked a resident to remove political election signs from their front yard. Covenants say they are not allowed. He responded by removing them.

Last edited by accufitgolf; 11-05-2011 at 07:34 AM..
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Old 11-05-2011, 08:06 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,985,208 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
I am a member of the board of directors of a townhouse HOA in California, and my understanding of the situation (which I can't swear to because I'm not a lawyer) is that the exterior of the structure is "owned" by the Association, but the interior of the structure is "owned" by the individual unit owner. At the very least (in case "owned" is not the right word), I do know for certain that the Association is responsible for all repairs and maintenance to the exterior of the structures (roofing, painting, wood rot repairs, etc), while the individual is responsible for all repairs and maintenance to the interior of the unit. If I damage an interior wall, or decide to paint it or paper it, that is entirely up to me. Likewise, I choose the flooring type (carpeting, tile, hardwood, fake wood), which I can change at any time without prior notice or approval. The association only has say-so over the interior in such matters as are required by municipal code for safety, such as the requirement to have a smoke detector on each level and the requirment to have an approved fire door between the garage and the rest of the unit. (In other words, the association has the right to enforce these code requirements because they affect the safety of all, being that the units share common walls side to side.
That all sounds about right for here, too. If the monthly/yearly condo fee does not cover heat and hot water (which is true in most cases) those pieces of working machinery (heater, etc) are the responsibility of the condo owner. In the rare case that either heat or hot water is provided by the association, then those operating units are the responsibility of the association. Property taxes are on the condo owner. So are water & sewer bills (in most cases).
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Old 11-05-2011, 08:12 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,985,208 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
Only one way to find out. Hit the road!
Ah, but the expense...I usually hit the road on the internet, and that is not anything close to direct experience. I found that out when I went to explore the South...certain areas had such online appeal but in person, quite a different matter (no online experience can simulate summer heat ). But it's a good start. On the other hand, based on internet searches I never would have chosen, say, the state of Missouri. But when going there twice out of necessity (jobs), I learned to adapt and appreciate many of the aspects of that underrated state...esp the lovely long autumns and springs. So you are right, hitting the road is the only way to go. Now, where would I want to head to come spring? If I could get a motorcycle and strap my dog on... ("newenglandgirl cycles West in search of nirvana...")
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Old 11-05-2011, 08:23 AM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,497,588 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Ah, but the expense...I usually hit the road on the internet, and that is not anything close to direct experience. I found that out when I went to explore the South...certain areas had such online appeal but in person, quite a different matter (no online experience can simulate summer heat ). But it's a good start. On the other hand, based on internet searches I never would have chosen, say, the state of Missouri. But when going there twice out of necessity (jobs), I learned to adapt and appreciate many of the aspects of that underrated state...esp the lovely long autumns and springs. So you are right, hitting the road is the only way to go. Now, where would I want to head to come spring? If I could get a motorcycle and strap my dog on... ("newenglandgirl cycles West in search of nirvana...")
One thing mosty people don't realize is that there really is a "divide" between ther State of Missouri and the Ozarks which actually make up a large portion of the state. Ozarkers tend to think regionally in that term and the region consists of part of MO, AR and OK. The Ozarks (Aux Arcs) are topographically and culturally unique due, in large part, to previous isolation and modern day, purposeful, lack of urgency to modernize. In many ways, it remains an "arrested" frontier.
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Old 11-05-2011, 08:24 AM
 
Location: Central Florida
973 posts, read 1,490,197 times
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A very interesting and informative thread. I can see several responses here that really fit into two "age categories", I think.

I love my house, but know that it will be hard for me to take care of esp in regards to the yard work (as even now I HATE DOING IT!!!). I plan on doing like what someone had already mentioned updating and fixing nearly everything before it all becomes a real burden, so then I can enjoy hopefully 10-12 years without many problems. By then, I will be in the final stage of my life and will have to re-think what I want to do...and to me that is scary.
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Old 11-05-2011, 08:54 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,747,361 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
That all sounds about right for here, too. If the monthly/yearly condo fee does not cover heat and hot water (which is true in most cases) those pieces of working machinery (heater, etc) are the responsibility of the condo owner. In the rare case that either heat or hot water is provided by the association, then those operating units are the responsibility of the association. Property taxes are on the condo owner. So are water & sewer bills (in most cases).
In our case the association pays the water and sewer bills, but of course the electricity and gas usages are individually metered.
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Old 11-05-2011, 09:23 AM
 
4,003 posts, read 3,224,645 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NY Annie View Post
I've lived in apts and in duplexes. I have lived in sf homes. Right now we have a 3,000 sf home that is also a duplex. I detest having neighbors. I would NEVER EVER in a million years live in a HOA. So we bought our retirement home. 900 sf, 4 acres of mostly woods. Yard work? Yup, I'm having raised bed gardens built - for when I can no longer bend over. Grass? Maybe. But then maybe I'll get a goat, too. No HOA to tell me I can't have a pet goat and no darned someone else mowing the lawn. Part of moving expenses that we have already budgeted and saved for include the lawn tractor, adding solar panels and a new roof. So what if I can't have a garbage disposal - the compost pile will take care of most of that and we will hire garbage collection. There's enough in the budget to hire help when we want it, on our time, our schedule, to do it our way.

1 more year until he retires. I am so ready to spend my days puttering around the house IF I want to or watching him putter. Or maybe we'll take a drive somewhere.
Yup yup yup!! I built a 1800 square foot home a few years ago, just the right size that I shouldnt have to move, not too big. I have 10 acres; my neighbors are just far enough way that we can wave and yell "howdy", but they arent close. Yard work, yes, I have flower beds and vegetable beds, and can't wait to retire so I can spend more time with them. Probably always have a few calves to keep the fields down, plenty of farmers who can round them up and take them to market when the time comes.

Ive done so much moving in my life, I just dont think Ill travel much when I retire. Maybe some cruises, that sounds fun. If so, Ill just have someone stay in the house while Im gone to take care of the critters.

My space makes me very happy, I want to retire right here.
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Old 11-06-2011, 11:06 AM
 
Location: Marietta, GA
857 posts, read 4,474,443 times
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I have always enjoyed buying a "fixer-upper" and working on it. I used to move every two years just so that I would have a new project. I have slowed down but still look forward to my next project.
The older I get the more I wish to off-load a bunch of my possessions and seek a smaller, more manageable house. My husband is going to need a ranch style house soon, so I will look for one more house here, and then start looking for our permanent "live in til we die" house somewhere other than here.
Once you get the place fixed up the normal maintenance is easy. I don't think I will ever rent because I like working on the house too much, but that may change as I get older.
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Old 11-06-2011, 02:16 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,938,980 times
Reputation: 6716
Quote:
Originally Posted by staywarm2 View Post
This sounds heavenly. If only we could sell the large 2 story home with basement we now own and move to a one-story place.

But there's still so much work to be done to get it sale ready...
Why not just reduce the price and sell it "as is". Robyn
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