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Old 01-01-2012, 05:35 PM
 
7,007 posts, read 6,990,757 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by accufitgolf View Post
My wifes idea of a kitchen is a wet bar with takeout menus posted on the walls. Want to eat? Call someone that cares....LOL
Hilarious!
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Old 01-01-2012, 06:55 PM
 
Location: on the road to new job
324 posts, read 587,709 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
Just curious about the issue of home ownership for retirees. How many have sold or consider selling single-dwelling houses and looked into apartments, condos or self contained retirement communities specifically to relieve themselves of the "burden" of upkeep and maintenance, including yard care, that goes along with home ownership?

As a homeowner of a certain age, I know how labor intensive and costly such things can be. Is it worth it to give up that facet of "The American Dream" - put in quotes because it's become so far outside the reach of so many - for the "comfort" of not having to worry about or pay for those things?

What say you, and why?
Sold several "homes" in the Western USA - and went back to the land in the Yukon. Thanks to having grandchildren, they can look after the old man. The American dream is a bust, not likely to be seen ever again.
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Old 01-01-2012, 07:51 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,932,507 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Years ago I got a small writing fellowship and lived in a contemporary design cabin (cathedral ceiling, large glass windows) in the woods for several months, the happiest experience I ever had in a dwelling. So well designed, no clutter or knicknacks, no enclosed feeling. Open, airy, clean.It must have been all of 800 sf.

Many contemporary-design small homes, including separate office/studios at home, are perfect for retirees. Well designed galley kitchens are great for cooking even the most gourmet style. Many Europeans live this way in small quarters but in style without suffering any lifestyle loss. It's a smaller footprint on the planet, living light and simple.

www.1kindesign.com/2011/04/11/living-large-in-61-square-meter-swedish-apartment/ (http://www.1kindesign.com/2011/04/11/living-large-in-61-square-meter-swedish-apartment/ - broken link)
One means of eliminating clutter is to have a lot of hidden storage space (which we do). Robyn
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Old 01-02-2012, 04:19 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,932,507 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by staywarm2 View Post
Robyn,

Nice floor plan! I especially like your screened in porch and also terrace! I would miss a kitchen nook, because we like to have a formal dining room for entertaining. I know many people in retirement don't want to entertain and maybe at some point we won't either. What a couple wants at age 65 can be totally different at 80. We're downsizing and we'd like our next house to be our last, but maybe at some point it will be too big, especially if there is just one of us...
Where I live - if you don't have screens - the bugs will make your life unbearable in the summer. We have both a sitting (to watch the birds and the sunset) and a dining area outside. Use both a lot. My only complaint about the area is it's a real PITA to keep it even a little clean and to clean it thoroughly during and at the end of pollen season (our trees are very healthy and produce huge amounts of pollen). My husband and I have always done this ourselves. But I think this year I'm going to give the job to the guy who does our pressure washing (assuming he'll do it - it's really grunt work).

We don't entertain often - and - when we do - it is mostly for no more than 4 people (our dining table can sit 6). The only time we gave a large dinner party (16) here was for my late FIL's last Thanksgiving. We rented tables and chairs and linens and had them set them up outside. Put a buffet on the dining room table. Luckily - the weather cooperated.

I think one of the current design trends today is to eliminate the small breakfast nook - and to integrate a dining area you can use 99% of the time with your kitchen area. With perhaps some bar stools at a counter in the kitchen. Our dining room - although not large - has a 78" x 47" table - Knoll Saarinen in white laminate:

Knoll : KnollStudio : Saarinen Dining, Side and Coffee Tables

Seats 4-6 easily (4 permanent Tulip chairs - 2 interesting mid-century folding chairs if we have to seat 6). I happen to be a mid-century modern design fan - and have actually owned this table for over 30 years now (have had to replace the chairs once due to sun damage). I like the table because you can have your morning coffee and read your newspaper on it - spill on it - get newsprint on it - and all you need to clean it is a little Windex and perhaps a bit of Comet to get out newsprint marks. OTOH - you can dress it up if you want to (flowers - candles - etc.).

IOW - I agree with the poster (can't see his name now while I'm writing) who asked - how often do you use things? I can't see having a formal dining area for 10-12 that I might use 5 times a year (or - in my case - once every 10 years) - and spending 99% of my time in a "breakfast nook". I like doing things the other way around - making my spaces comfortable for how *I* live 99% of the time - and worrying about the other 1% when it arises. E.g., I'll be having at least 8 for dinner in early March when my brother visits with his family. Hope the weather cooperates for indoor/outdoor dining (early March is "iffy'). But - if it doesn't - perhaps the cheapest solution will be a small space heater outside on the porch (some inside and some outside - and we'll take turns inside/outside ). Robyn
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Old 01-02-2012, 04:56 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,932,507 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
Nope! Not havin' it. I don't care how well designed they are, no galley/pullman kitchens for these retirees. Ours is a comfortably large, rectangular kitchen with lots of counter and cupboard space and room to move and maneuver. Those are essential to us because we're well-outfitted and appointed in terms of pots, pans and other necessities and we very often cook together so room to move and prepare without getting in one another's way is an imperative. Now, with children in the home who want to help with the baking and other fun things, maneuver space is all the more necessary. Grandpa can get snarky when crowded!
I think that both you and newenglandgirl have it wrong - because you don't understand European kitchen cabinets. My current place is the third German kitchen cabinet place I've had since I first bought a condo in 1973. When it comes to German cabinets - it's like furniture. Meant to be installed when you move in - and taken with you when you move out. It has tons more storage per linear foot than conventional American cabinets. It's also more "senior friendly" (full extension pull out bottom drawers make it easy to get to stuff without bending over/falling down - etc.). Below is most of my kitchen - and - believe it or not - I can easily pack in 4 sets of dishes - 3 sets of flatware - and almost every pot/pan/gizmo known to man .

Like I've said - I think I should have designed 2 separate food prep areas when I designed the kitchen. But we were on a budget (it might seem a high budget to many - but it was our budget). And at about $1k/linear square foot for cabinets - this was a kitchen we could afford. The design would perhaps be a bit different today (especially in terms of shape) - because kitchen design trends in 2012 are different than they were in 1995. Robyn








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Old 01-02-2012, 06:38 PM
 
7,007 posts, read 6,990,757 times
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Dining Room

When we lived in FL we entertained out on our lanai/screen covered pool area all the time. Even had Easter dinner for 10 out there. However, here in GA where it gets cold, inside is a must. We have a full formal dining room to seat 10-12. It's also great when we play cards with a group. A quick cover up with a vinyl tablecloth and we're ready to play. I know using that space only occasionally is an extravagance, but I can't give it up. I refinished the table myself. So many memories of using it for family now long dead... I also like it for training the grandchildren how to behave in a nice setting. We even toasted them this Christmas (with apple cider for them). They liked doing that.
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Old 01-03-2012, 01:56 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,978,143 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
I think that both you and newenglandgirl have it wrong - because you don't understand European kitchen cabinets. My current place is the third German kitchen cabinet place I've had since I first bought a condo in 1973. When it comes to German cabinets - it's like furniture. Meant to be installed when you move in - and taken with you when you move out. It has tons more storage per linear foot than conventional American cabinets. It's also more "senior friendly" (full extension pull out bottom drawers make it easy to get to stuff without bending over/falling down - etc.). Below is most of my kitchen - and - believe it or not - I can easily pack in 4 sets of dishes - 3 sets of flatware - and almost every pot/pan/gizmo known to man .

Like I've said - I think I should have designed 2 separate food prep areas when I designed the kitchen. But we were on a budget (it might seem a high budget to many - but it was our budget). And at about $1k/linear square foot for cabinets - this was a kitchen we could afford. The design would perhaps be a bit different today (especially in terms of shape) - because kitchen design trends in 2012 are different than they were in 1995. Robyn

Nice. Needs a single splash of color--a statement--red behind the toaster oven, to make it less austere. But a very nice design.
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Old 01-04-2012, 04:56 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,932,507 times
Reputation: 6716
This is the painting in the dining room that is open to the kitchen. It's kind of a focal point - and I don't want it to clash with a red toaster . Robyn:

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Old 01-04-2012, 04:59 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,932,507 times
Reputation: 6716
Quote:
Originally Posted by staywarm2 View Post
Dining Room

When we lived in FL we entertained out on our lanai/screen covered pool area all the time. Even had Easter dinner for 10 out there. However, here in GA where it gets cold, inside is a must. We have a full formal dining room to seat 10-12. It's also great when we play cards with a group. A quick cover up with a vinyl tablecloth and we're ready to play. I know using that space only occasionally is an extravagance, but I can't give it up. I refinished the table myself. So many memories of using it for family now long dead... I also like it for training the grandchildren how to behave in a nice setting. We even toasted them this Christmas (with apple cider for them). They liked doing that.
If it makes you happy - and you can afford it - DO IT. No apologies necessary (at least to me). Robyn
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Old 01-05-2012, 05:56 AM
 
7,007 posts, read 6,990,757 times
Reputation: 5821
Default A Different Lifestyle

Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
If it makes you happy - and you can afford it - DO IT. No apologies necessary (at least to me). Robyn
I'm certainly not apologizing, simply stating a totally different taste & lifestyle. We definitely don't all want the same things. It's what makes the world go around!

Last edited by staywarm2; 01-05-2012 at 06:56 AM..
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