U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-22-2011, 10:25 AM
 
28,285 posts, read 39,947,386 times
Reputation: 36799

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by MadManofBethesda View Post
Apparently that cruise ship never launched. That link is from 2009 and I could find no other info on the company other than their LLC is apparently now inactive.

Notwithstanding the above, I agree with you about retiring on a cruise ship. I guess I'm actually doing so on a part-time basis anyway. This year alone my wife and I will spend 2 1/2 months on cruise ships: 30 days cruising around South America from LA to Brazil; 16 days from Ft. Lauderdale to Spain & Italy; 14 days from Barcelona to New Orleans; and, 14 days from Rome to Ft. Lauderdale.

And the prices are definitely cheaper than $375/day. In fact, for our upcoming 14-day cruise from Barcelona to New Orleans, my wife and I are only paying $499pp for the entire cruise. Of course, there will be a few other charges (tips, drinks, etc.), but we're even getting an onboard credit of $250 to help offset the incidental expenses because we are shareholders.

The one downside to trying to actually retire on a cruise ship is that the onboard medical services are pretty limited. In fact, just a week or so ago, an elderly gentleman on a cruise ship became ill and ship personnel basically dumped him in Cartegena, Columbia.

Norwegian Cruise Lines responds after sick, elderly couple is left in Colombia | wtsp.com
Mrs. Tek and I are jealous BTW...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-22-2011, 11:03 AM
 
6,312 posts, read 4,760,180 times
Reputation: 12963
I lived on Long Island in a modest house with high income and property taxes, electric rates 3x the national average, with congested roads and bridges, and was also tired of the long winters, rainy spring months and the house and yard maintenance.

The best solution would be to have no property taxes, no State income taxes, no home maintenance and to be able to live in different parts of the country depending on the weather and seasons. So I joined the quarter million other Americans who live fulltime in RVs. I enjoyed late winter/early Spring in Virginia and North Carolina. Williamsburg, the outer banks and the Great Smokey Mountains were great. June was springtime in the badlands of South Dakota, and the Bighorn Mountains of Wyoming. Spring weather continued as we travelled north into Yellowstone, then Glacier, then the Canadian Rockies. We are currently in Portland, Oregon and will be heading south as the Oregon rainy season begins. Winter will be in southern California, Arizona, New Mexico. Early in next Spring I plan on being in southern Utah - Zion, Bryce, Capitol Reef, Canyonlands, Arches, and other hidden spots that I will not name.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2011, 02:20 PM
 
Location: Bar Harbor, ME
1,922 posts, read 3,782,834 times
Reputation: 1292
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Hey Zarathu, check back in when you're up on the roof at age 80 scraping off snow so you don't get an ice dam.

You've got some great points here, nonetheless!
I don't get on roofs now, or even when I was 33. Always been afraid of heights. What I do is put in ropes that hang down over the edge of the roof. You slide these back and forth and it frees up the snow and ice to roll off the roof, slicing the bottoms off them. Works pretty well.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2011, 03:45 PM
 
Location: Sequim, WA
786 posts, read 1,909,137 times
Reputation: 888
My wife and I do plan to change houses...we just don't have the details worked out. At least "we've" made progress in that she now agrees with me that a change is needed.

For us...renting is out. We're just the kind of people who need to feel that they own their home.

But...we could certainly still own a home and make some very positive changes:

1. We need to get out of this high-maintenance house and yard. Instead of all the cedar siding that I have repaired and stained 3 times in the past 22 years...I could see a newer stucco home, or other material that requires little maintenance. I've always done most of my own work, and over the past few years I've learned (not that I wanted to) about: torn rotator cuffs, costochondritis, trigger thumb.

2. Our yard has too many big trees that drop millions of leaves...and too much un-natural grass that consumes an absurd amount of water. If we were to remain in the Southwest region of the country, I could go along with a couple of acres of natural vegetation. There are subdivisions around here like that, and the owners don't do much in the way of yard maintenance.

So...for us...we believe there are options that would allow us to still own a home but not spend inordinate amounts of time and energy to maintain it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2011, 04:04 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 19,001,270 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrgoodwx View Post
My wife and I do plan to change houses...we just don't have the details worked out. At least "we've" made progress in that she now agrees with me that a change is needed.

For us...renting is out. We're just the kind of people who need to feel that they own their home.

But...we could certainly still own a home and make some very positive changes:

1. We need to get out of this high-maintenance house and yard. Instead of all the cedar siding that I have repaired and stained 3 times in the past 22 years...I could see a newer stucco home, or other material that requires little maintenance. I've always done most of my own work, and over the past few years I've learned (not that I wanted to) about: torn rotator cuffs, costochondritis, trigger thumb.

2. Our yard has too many big trees that drop millions of leaves...and too much un-natural grass that consumes an absurd amount of water. If we were to remain in the Southwest region of the country, I could go along with a couple of acres of natural vegetation. There are subdivisions around here like that, and the owners don't do much in the way of yard maintenance.

So...for us...we believe there are options that would allow us to still own a home but not spend inordinate amounts of time and energy to maintain it.
I relate to this. Owning your place, with no or few trees, little lawn, very short driveway, all one floor, tight in terms of energy, easy siding (nothing to stain), etc...makes really good sense. In all climates.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2011, 05:03 PM
 
2,421 posts, read 3,729,223 times
Reputation: 3455
Sounds like Mexico. (except for the single story) No yards, lots of concrete.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2011, 10:20 PM
 
Location: Whereever we have our RV parked
8,827 posts, read 7,728,859 times
Reputation: 15129
I've been thinking on the same track. Condo is an option, but from what others have said, maybe not. I've also considered mobile home. Small. The park owner takes care of yard and property maint. The MH is pretty cheap to insure since there isn't a big investment. There's little or no property taxes in most places and you can still get 1000+ sq. ft. which is about what we need. Florida has a lot of 55+ parks and that is the kind of thing I'd be looking for, but we probably will not go to Florida. Any input on other options is appreciated.

You all are right. House is a money pit. Our AC and water bill this summer was $250 a couple of months. Property taxes in Texas are high and homeowners insurance is over $1000 in Texas. On top of that, its hard to find someone to come work on your house that isn't a crook.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2011, 10:34 PM
 
8,211 posts, read 11,932,798 times
Reputation: 18044
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prairieparson View Post
On top of that, its hard to find someone to come work on your house that isn't a crook.
Angie's List solves that problem. I've never had a negative experience with any person or firm I've used from there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2011, 11:50 PM
 
Location: Sequim, WA
786 posts, read 1,909,137 times
Reputation: 888
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
I relate to this. Owning your place, with no or few trees, little lawn, very short driveway, all one floor, tight in terms of energy, easy siding (nothing to stain), etc...makes really good sense. In all climates.
I agree that it makes good sense. However...my choice would actually be a couple of acres (for elbow room from noisy neighbors)...but natural grasses and a combination of pinion pine and ponderosa pine trees. Here in New Mexico, people do have houses on a few acres and just leave the natural grasses and trees alone...no mowing necessary.

A house with only one floor is important to us. My wife has already had knee surgery so stairs aren't going to be something we want. We also want the exterior to have as little wood as possible (stucco or cement fiber board would be nice)!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-23-2011, 04:09 AM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,519,632 times
Reputation: 29081
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prairieparson View Post
I've been thinking on the same track. Condo is an option, but from what others have said, maybe not. I've also considered mobile home. Small. The park owner takes care of yard and property maint. The MH is pretty cheap to insure since there isn't a big investment. There's little or no property taxes in most places and you can still get 1000+ sq. ft. which is about what we need. Florida has a lot of 55+ parks and that is the kind of thing I'd be looking for, but we probably will not go to Florida. Any input on other options is appreciated.

You all are right. House is a money pit. Our AC and water bill this summer was $250 a couple of months. Property taxes in Texas are high and homeowners insurance is over $1000 in Texas. On top of that, its hard to find someone to come work on your house that isn't a crook.
One trouble I have with mobile home parks is that in most cases you don't own the land. While the cost of the home is certainly reasonable, the space rental in most has a habit of increasing on an annual basis in many of them. Social Security provides a COLA and, voilà, up goes the "rent." Solution: purchase a home in a park in which you also own the lot.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top