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Old 11-15-2011, 05:42 PM
 
Location: Texas
14,078 posts, read 17,652,720 times
Reputation: 7720

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
Gosh - what do you do - just make this stuff up?

After Hurricane Andrew (which I lived through) - FPL paid to repair the grid - and then the costs (direct and indirect) were passed through to customers):

Fpl Customers To Cover Storm Repair Costs - Sun Sentinel

As for the vegetable matter storm debris - it was picked up by by our local garbage guys - and firms that got contracts to remove it (local garbage guys weren't in a position to remove tons of huge trees that came down). And most of that debris was mulched and dumped in the Crandon Park (big beach) parking lot. After offers of free mulch didn't reduce the pile by 1 inch - the county and the EPA fought for months about what to do with it. The EPA refused to issue a burn permit - said it would pollute the air. Finally - when the stuff started to rot and stink - the county gave a finger to the EPA - set the stuff on fire - and it was gone in a few days. That was the end of that.

Just FWIW - we didn't have a problem with tree removal at our condo. Every single piece of landscaping washed into Biscayne Bay and out into the Atlantic Ocean and was never seen again (at least not by us).

There were other kinds of debris - like pool screen enclosures. And lots of guys came around offering to haul away your debris for free (because some of the debris - like aluminum - had recycling value).

If FEMA takes care of your snow removal - please let those of us in Florida know how we can get it to pay for hurricane debris removal . Robyn

That was in 1993, but even back then, the local, county and state governments had access to federal help with debris removal and other disaster related expenses, either in the form of reimbursement or direct federal aid.

Today, a federal disaster proclamation frees up literally billions of dollars to help pay the cost of debris removal, power restoration, road and bridge repairs, public safety expenses (including overtime for first responders) etc. Why do you think Governor's are always screaming for a disaster declaration? Just for the heck of it? They want the money and, in cases of really severe disasters, they really need the help or little will get done.

Case in point: Katrina felled literally thousands of trees on the heavily forested north shore of Lake Ponchartrain, in addition to a storm surge which ranged from 2 feet near the Causeway at Mandeville, LA to over 20 feet at Slidell. St. Tammany Parish was stretched far, far beyond its ability to respond, so FEMA eventually stepped in and took over most operations, including debris removal.

They contracted dozens of coal haulers from Kentucky and WV and PA to come down to south Louisiana and haul off the brush. They chose coal haulers because they pull high-sided dump trailers and could carry a lot of wood. They also contracted companies to pick up, load and dispose of billions of tons of broken trees. They had the capability to do that, and pay for it, whereas St. Tammany Parish could not have done it. The same, basic story was repeated across the Gulf Coast as far away as Florida and it's been repeated dozens of times since.

And, what's wrong with that? If our tax dollars can't be spent to assist our people when they have the greatest need, of what use is our government?
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Old 11-15-2011, 05:44 PM
 
Location: Texas
14,078 posts, read 17,652,720 times
Reputation: 7720
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
Gosh - one thing we agree on. Chainsaws are dangerous - and unless you're skilled with one - a skill people like me and my husband have never acquired - it's a bad idea to try one out for the first time after a storm.

OTOH - if you don't know how to use a chainsaw - or can't afford a good tree service - people like your single mom with 3 kids or the 87 year old guy on oxygen - it's also a bad idea to live in a place where big trees can present problems. Like falling on your house - catching on fire - or falling on your power lines (especially if you're disabled and need electricity to run things that keep you alive). Robyn
So, what? The best solution for disabled people, single parents or those without insurance is to move the Mojave Desert where there aren't any trees to fall on their houses?
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Old 11-15-2011, 05:47 PM
 
Location: Texas
14,078 posts, read 17,652,720 times
Reputation: 7720
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post

You come on down and visit me some time. And I'll take you to a typical Golden Corral in JAX - where probably over 50% of the diners are morbidly obese black women with numerous illegitimate kids. Not a father in sight. You'll see the 34 year old grandmothers too.
So...those people don't "deserve" to eat? How would YOU like to be punished the rest of your life for YOUR poor choices?

Quote:
One's perspective on life may be a result of what you see when you look around you. And although I would like to try to come up with a solution for a 45 year old construction worker in Florida who can't find a job now - even if it might cost me some dollars - I have no desire to support 17 year old mothers - 34 year old grandmothers - 51 year old great grandmothers - and great great grandmothers who are my age. Think most people in Utah - and a lot of retired people who have lived more or less middle class lives - would agree with me. Robyn
Would you prefer to see them living on the streets, starving and dying on the sidewalks from lack of medical care, including their children?
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Old 11-15-2011, 05:56 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,917,951 times
Reputation: 6716
Quote:
Originally Posted by TuborgP View Post
I have read all of this including MathJak and others talking about the difficulty of this low interest rate environment. It is part of the reason I said what I said. If you haven't read the many posts by contributors in this forum complaining about low interest rates than ok. I am on your side.
Don't know if you caught this this morning. Very bad implications for savers and retired people:

msnbc.com Video Player

We've got to bail out the banks and the people who spent over their heads - and everyone else. Everyone who wasn't prudent. Pisses me off. Robyn
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Old 11-15-2011, 06:04 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,917,951 times
Reputation: 6716
Quote:
Originally Posted by stillkit View Post
So, what would you suggest we do about that? Government-mandated sterilization unless they meet your standards of behavior? How would like MY standards applied against YOUR life?
I'll bite. 2 illegitimate kids and you/your kids are living on the dole - out with your female plumbing. Ditto with guys. Robyn
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Old 11-15-2011, 07:09 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
21,534 posts, read 43,962,244 times
Reputation: 15133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
You come on down and visit me some time. And I'll take you to a typical Golden Corral in JAX - where probably over 50% of the diners are morbidly obese black women with numerous illegitimate kids. Not a father in sight. You'll see the 34 year old grandmothers too.
Robyn
Got plenty of that around here, too.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
I have no desire to support 17 year old mothers - 34 year old grandmothers - 51 year old great grandmothers - and great great grandmothers who are my age. Think most people in Utah - and a lot of retired people who have lived more or less middle class lives - would agree with me. Robyn
Yup.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
I'll bite. 2 illegitimate kids and you/your kids are living on the dole - out with your female plumbing. Ditto with guys. Robyn
Yup. You refuse to be responsible and put the burden of yourself and your kids on society, you lose your license to reproduce.
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Old 11-15-2011, 07:37 PM
 
Location: Texas
14,078 posts, read 17,652,720 times
Reputation: 7720
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
I'll bite. 2 illegitimate kids and you/your kids are living on the dole - out with your female plumbing. Ditto with guys. Robyn
You mean forced sterilization, like they used to do in Nazi Germany?
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Old 11-15-2011, 07:46 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,745 posts, read 4,213,572 times
Reputation: 6866
Quote:
Originally Posted by stillkit View Post
You mean forced sterilization, like they used to do in Nazi Germany?
No, I think they mean like we used to do in the United States.
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Old 11-15-2011, 08:18 PM
 
Location: Texas
14,078 posts, read 17,652,720 times
Reputation: 7720
Quote:
Originally Posted by lenora View Post
No, I think they mean like we used to do in the United States.
Nothing like a little eugenics to illustrate this great American ideal, is there?

"We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness."

Unless, of course, your life, liberty and/or pursuit of happiness might indirectly cost me a few bucks or I just get pizzed off looking at you.
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Old 11-15-2011, 10:46 PM
 
9,181 posts, read 9,263,338 times
Reputation: 28754
Quote:
Gosh - one thing we agree on. Chainsaws are dangerous - and unless you're skilled with one - a skill people like me and my husband have never acquired - it's a bad idea to try one out for the first time after a storm.

OTOH - if you don't know how to use a chainsaw - or can't afford a good tree service - people like your single mom with 3 kids or the 87 year old guy on oxygen - it's also a bad idea to live in a place where big trees can present problems. Like falling on your house - catching on fire - or falling on your power lines (especially if you're disabled and need electricity to run things that keep you alive). Robyn
Chainsaws? Got a gas powered one and an electric both. Last Saturday, I had to climb onto my roof to trim some oak limbs with it. Anybody can learn to operate a chainsaw. They just have to be careful. I was more concerned climbing the ladder onto my roof than using the saw.

Any homeowner around here does the same.
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