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Old 11-11-2011, 04:03 AM
 
Location: Texas
14,078 posts, read 17,664,473 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles View Post
seems to contradict with

The presence of Malaria carrying mosquitos in tropical and sub-Saharan areas is a long established, scientific fact. One would be as foolish to ignore that as one would be to drink a nice, cold glass of anti-freeze.

Most preventative drugs, on the other hand, cannot establish a definitive quid pro quo. If you DON'T take this, you WILL get that or, conversely, if you DO take this, you WON'T get that. The best they can offer is better odds.
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Old 11-11-2011, 09:34 AM
Status: "Be yourself. What's the alternative?" (set 20 days ago)
 
8,696 posts, read 10,842,175 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bette View Post
Are you taking medications now for something that you feel could have been prevented?

(Concerned about cost down the road and trying to prepare).

Example: My sister's husband has Parkinsons - stage 4 or 5 now. She now is learning a whole new way of eating; maybe if she had done this 5 years ago, he wouldn't be where he is today.

I am the world's worst eater so I'm trying to correct some of my bad habits but it's so hard....
Parkinson's Disease isn't caused by faulty diet. It's caused by not enough dopamine made. I think it's good to eat good, low saturated fats, good fats, low sugar/sodium, vegies/fruits, but people still can get sick. Lifestyle is important--diet, exercise, stress reduction & all of that--some diseases can be prevented that way, but not all.
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Old 11-11-2011, 10:16 AM
GLS
 
1,985 posts, read 4,847,217 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stillkit View Post
Yes.

Why, you may ask? Because my doctor isn't responsible for my health. God and I are. And, I understand that I'll die someday from something and I'm not afraid of it.

It really doesn't matter to me what the final cause is.
I respect your opinion, and I have laughed at my share of jokes like: "MD stands for Major Deity". However, I would appreciate you at least considering the following in your perspective. A good doctor could be one of God's messengers.
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Old 11-11-2011, 10:49 AM
GLS
 
1,985 posts, read 4,847,217 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by songbird52 View Post
Don't take statins unless it's absolutely necessary. They do not cure artery disease, just help reduce the inflammation. There are better more natural ways to reduce inflammation, such as getting moderate exercise every day and eating reasonably.

Lowering cholesterol is only incidental, and not related to preventing heart disease or stroke.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cattknap View Post
This is correct and in line with recommendations by the Mayo Clinic.

Statins: Are these cholesterol-lowering drugs right for you? - MayoClinic.com
First, thank you for the reference to the MayoClinic article. It is an excellent synopsis on the topic and is presented in readable format for laymen. It also corroborates the points I made in my first post that were too detailed to elaborate on.

However, and this is a big "however". The conclusions in Songbird52's post are NOT supported by the Mayo Clinic. They contain a great degree of oversimplification and misinterpretation. In my opinion, the first sentence is 100% accurate, with the caveat that the decision of "necessary" is jointly arrived at by a trained physician and the patient. The second sentence is only about 50% true. The third sentence makes the invalid assumption that "more natural" ways are "better for ALL patients, which they are not. And finally, nothing in the Mayo Clinic suggests that lowering cholesterol is "incidental" or "not related" to preventing heart disease or stroke.

Thank you again for the Mayo Clinic article. In addition to general education, I would suggest patients use it to make a checklist of informed questions to discuss with their physician. Don't be embarassed to ask. Don't try to memorize the questions. Bring a copy into your physician's office and keep asking until you are comfortable you have arrived at an informed decision.
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Old 11-11-2011, 11:02 AM
 
48 posts, read 38,717 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GLS View Post
First, thank you for the reference to the MayoClinic article. It is an excellent synopsis on the topic and is presented in readable format for laymen. It also corroborates the points I made in my first post that were too detailed to elaborate on.

However, and this is a big "however". The conclusions in Songbird52's post are NOT supported by the Mayo Clinic. They contain a great degree of oversimplification and misinterpretation. In my opinion, the first sentence is 100% accurate, with the caveat that the decision of "necessary" is jointly arrived at by a trained physician and the patient. The second sentence is only about 50% true. The third sentence makes the invalid assumption that "more natural" ways are "better for ALL patients, which they are not. And finally, nothing in the Mayo Clinic suggests that lowering cholesterol is "incidental" or "not related" to preventing heart disease or stroke.

Thank you again for the Mayo Clinic article. In addition to general education, I would suggest patients use it to make a checklist of informed questions to discuss with their physician. Don't be embarassed to ask. Don't try to memorize the questions. Bring a copy into your physician's office and keep asking until you are comfortable you have arrived at an informed decision.
I had qualified the statement in my comment. I made sure to say that this is not true for all patients, although it is true for most. Cholesterol-lowering drugs can save lives, but this is only true for a very small number of patients, compared to the very large number who have artery disease because of their lifestyle.

Taking drugs involves risk, especially in combination and over many years. MDs are not always aware, and the drugs are seldom tested in combinations over long periods of time.

We are accustomed to thinking that medicine must have harmful side effects. But holistic healing is always preferable, when it is possible. Of course there are diseases that required drugs and surgery, but many do not. So many of the most common diseases today are lifestyle-related.
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Old 11-11-2011, 11:05 AM
 
48 posts, read 38,717 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phoenix lady View Post
Parkinson's Disease isn't caused by faulty diet. It's caused by not enough dopamine made. I think it's good to eat good, low saturated fats, good fats, low sugar/sodium, vegies/fruits, but people still can get sick. Lifestyle is important--diet, exercise, stress reduction & all of that--some diseases can be prevented that way, but not all.
Yes people can get sick no matter what they eat or how they live. But it is wrong to think the real cause of Parkinson's Disease is not enough dopamine. Low levels of dopamine are associated with Parkinson's Disease, but that does not mean the cause is known. It might be related to lifestyle or environmental factors. Were people getting it at the same rates decades ago? I doubt it.
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Old 11-11-2011, 12:16 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic east coast
5,371 posts, read 9,865,001 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by recycled View Post
I am age "late 50s" and don't use any prescription meds. I am 6'1" - 186 lb, and ride a bicycle nearly every day and walk a lot, so I get lots of cardio activity. I eat mostly fresh fruits and veggies, fish, chicken, beans, brown rice, whole grains, steel cut oats and drink mostly plain water. No juices, milk, coffee, tea, booze. No canned food, no frozen foods in a box, minimal amounts of "snack foods". I don't feel like I am on a diet because I eat plenty of food, it's just that I try to avoid calories that don't have some nutritional value. What works for me might not work for someone else.

I don't take many extra "supplements" because I try to get most vitamins naturally from food. I take a Vitamin D pill daily, and I also take a magnesium pill because it is good for the heart. Most multi-vitamin pills are difficult for the body to absorb and don't do that much good if a person is eating a healthy balanced diet.

I think this is a wise post...making each bite of food count as good nutrition..I do much the same and have managed to stay healthy, my weight in a normal range, and am without meds...the blood pressure thing I'm still trying to figure out. Mine's high (where I'd be put on BP meds to bring it down) when I first get up and comes down dramatically after a cardio/weight stint at the gym or doing yoga. Not sure what that means...is it high or not? Anyhow, I just plug along keeping up the exercise and the good eating and avoid the meds...

I have to keep a close eye on my blood pressure. Some foods or beverages can send my blood pressure way above the "normal" range (which is around 120/80). If I went to lunch and ordered a big plate of Penne al Pomodoro (pasta) and then went to the cardio doc for a blood pressure check, he would want to put me on BP meds right away. This actually happened to me 5 years ago, which is why I bought a BP monitoring machine for home and have learned how to keep the BP under control as much as possible without meds.
I think this is a wise post...making each bite of food count as good nutrition..I do much the same and have managed to stay healthy, my weight in a normal range, and am without meds...the blood pressure thing I'm still trying to figure out, too. Mine's high (where I'd be put on BP meds to bring it down) when I first get up and it comes down dramatically to a normal range (127/72) after a cardio/weight stint at the gym or doing yoga. Not sure what that means...is it high or not? Anyhow, I just plug along keeping up the exercise and the good eating and avoid the meds...

Vitamins? A few...fish oil helps my creaky knees, calcium with D, extra potassium, vitamin C especially during cold/flu season...supplemented by oranges/tangerines when in season.

To the OP, knowing you've identified your bad eating habits is the first step to a healthy change--and you seem motivated, too. I bet you'll do well. A suggestion is a consultation with a dietician to help you know what to shop for and what kind of meals you can make from a well-stocked pantry of whole grains, vegetables, fruits, legumes, good oils, and nuts and seeds.

This is not a diet, it's a new life-long healthy way of eating that fills you in all the hungry places with life-giving nutrients.

It's those highly processed foods with all the additives that will harm your health...learning to buy and prepare whole foods is your ticket to a long and healthy life...plus exercise, of course. You've gotta use your body or it will rust out...
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Old 11-11-2011, 01:02 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic east coast
5,371 posts, read 9,865,001 times
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Just wanted to add that I, too, have experienced sudden BP spikes after eating foods that were highly salted and high in MSG--this is not uncommon to have blood pressure spikes after eating certain "trigger" foods....
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Old 11-11-2011, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
21,539 posts, read 44,010,725 times
Reputation: 15140
Quote:
Originally Posted by LittleDolphin View Post
I think this is a wise post...making each bite of food count as good nutrition..

A suggestion is a consultation with a dietician to help you know what to shop for and what kind of meals you can make from a well-stocked pantry of whole grains, vegetables, fruits, legumes, good oils, and nuts and seeds.

This is not a diet, it's a new life-long healthy way of eating that fills you in all the hungry places with life-giving nutrients.

It's those highly processed foods with all the additives that will harm your health...learning to buy and prepare whole foods is your ticket to a long and healthy life...plus exercise, of course. You've gotta use your body or it will rust out...
Yup. It has been said and I've noticed for years that eating nutritionally packed whole foods is much more satisfying/satiating than empty-calorie foods. The desire to overeat, snack, and for sweets is pretty much eliminated.

Eating high-quality whole foods is also a great way to lose weight. When I was in my late teens to early 20s my weight yo-yo'd 30 lbs. which meant up or down one clothing size, which I couldn't afford. In those days I didn't eat breakfast and did most of my eating at night - from dinner to bedtime.

At the age of 21, I made up my mind no more of this. Began eating breakfast of a soft-boiled egg, whole grain cereal w/fruit/nuts, lunch of soup/sandwich, mid afternoon apple, dinner of meat, huge fresh salad, steamed vegetable (no potatoes), fresh fruit a couple hours later. Lost 20 lbs in three months, ten lbs over the next year and kept it off. In the process, I permanently changed my eating habits. Have eaten that way to this day - almost 50 years later. No health or weight issues whatsoever.

I do spend a lot on organic groceries and do a fair amount of cooking, so I'm always on the hunt for sales/coupons, pretty much shop the perimeter of the store - and firmly believe a high-quality diet is my #1 frontline defense to maintaining good health, in addition to filtered water, a variety of supplements, exercise, and adequate sleep 7/8 hrs a night.
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Old 11-11-2011, 01:32 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,737,509 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stillkit View Post
The presence of Malaria carrying mosquitos in tropical and sub-Saharan areas is a long established, scientific fact. One would be as foolish to ignore that as one would be to drink a nice, cold glass of anti-freeze.

Most preventative drugs, on the other hand, cannot establish a definitive quid pro quo. If you DON'T take this, you WILL get that or, conversely, if you DO take this, you WON'T get that. The best they can offer is better odds.
I agree with the above. I would add that in some cases, drugs can better the odds of not getting something quite substantially. Two examples: First, the flu shots, which are highly effective. You can get a flu shot and still get the flu, but the chances of that happening are fairly small. Second, oral contraceptives (birth control pills), which are also highly effective. A woman can take birth control pills as directed and still get pregnant, but that is (fortunately) quite rare.

Many other vaccines are also quite effective, and that is one area of medicine which is cost-effective and about which no rational doubt exists. I am 67 and after a friend described the pain and duration of his shingles attack, I wasted no time in getting my shingles vaccination upon turning 65.
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