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Old 11-25-2011, 05:53 AM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,467,321 times
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I know mine sure have and I'm wondering if this is "natural" once you leave the rat race of work.

I despised my last year of work and did a good job of eating my way through it. Even though i walked to and from work, a total distance of four miles, I ended up gaining about 50 pounds and retired with every ounce of it. Good thing I retired two years earlier than planned or I'd have ended up a blimp!

Once we bought our retirement home and made our 2,000 mile move I did a lot of landscaping, put in raised garden beds and started cultivating fresh vegetables. That, along with other work around the place, resulted in losing 30 pounds during our first year here.

While we'd always eaten a balanced diet, this year we began a new, healthy diet regimen shunning most fats and all sugars. The end result has been the loss of another 30 pounds.

Have you stayed the same, gained or lost since retiring and to what do you attribute it. Perhaps there are those who would like to make some changes in either direction and would like to know what's worked for you.
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Old 11-25-2011, 06:50 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,967,079 times
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I'm less sedentary in retirement. With my vascular (leg) problem my M.D. has prescribed vigorous exercise to a point. Other than walking I hate to exercise. In my new location I was able to get a community pass to the college pool nearby, and I do water aerobics and then go into the indoor track and walk as much as I can. Since I cannot do more than that I have to control my diet. I never ate much put I have a soft spot for sugar (or honey) as in wholewheat muffins, and also for carbs as in whole wheat bread. I have read that foods with gluten cause obesity and have tried the gluten-free diet but can't seem to stick to it.

For several decades or more I was happy with a wholegrain, sugar-free, mostly vegetarian diet. A number of young families were bringing up their kids that way and we all got together for potlucks--there was a support system, which really helped parents as it's not easy to eat healthily in most developed countries. It actually has gotten harder for me to do this as the kids have grown up and left home Being a natural caretaker, I've lost some motivation and my habits are creeping back to pre-health-conscious days.

Now I eat brown rice and cracked whole oats fairly often, with salmon and veg's and fruits. I don't buy or eat junk food or prepackaged food. My weak spots--actually habits--are several cups of coffee with cream daily (never touched cream in the "healthy years"), sometimes cheese (generally a no-no for health conscious people), and those whole wheat muffins and english muffins that I love for breakfast. Oh, and dark chocolate when I'm stressed. If I could cut out these four things in these retirement years I know I'd weigh a lot less and feel a lot better, but I see now more than ever how "comfort" foods play such a big role in handling stress.

So, Curmudgeon, how about some tips for staying off my favorite comfort foods?
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Old 11-25-2011, 07:25 AM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,467,321 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
I'm less sedentary in retirement. With my vascular (leg) problem my M.D. has prescribed vigorous exercise to a point. Other than walking I hate to exercise. In my new location I was able to get a community pass to the college pool nearby, and I do water aerobics and then go into the indoor track and walk as much as I can. Since I cannot do more than that I have to control my diet. I never ate much put I have a soft spot for sugar (or honey) as in wholewheat muffins, and also for carbs as in whole wheat bread. I have read that foods with gluten cause obesity and have tried the gluten-free diet but can't seem to stick to it.

For several decades or more I was happy with a wholegrain, sugar-free, mostly vegetarian diet. A number of young families were bringing up their kids that way and we all got together for potlucks--there was a support system, which really helped parents as it's not easy to eat healthily in most developed countries. It actually has gotten harder for me to do this as the kids have grown up and left home Being a natural caretaker, I've lost some motivation and my habits are creeping back to pre-health-conscious days.

Now I eat brown rice and cracked whole oats fairly often, with salmon and veg's and fruits. I don't buy or eat junk food or prepackaged food. My weak spots--actually habits--are several cups of coffee with cream daily (never touched cream in the "healthy years"), sometimes cheese (generally a no-no for health conscious people), and those whole wheat muffins and english muffins that I love for breakfast. Oh, and dark chocolate when I'm stressed. If I could cut out these four things in these retirement years I know I'd weigh a lot less and feel a lot better, but I see now more than ever how "comfort" foods play such a big role in handling stress.

So, Curmudgeon, how about some tips for staying off my favorite comfort foods?
Can't help you there. We still insist on 1/2&1/2 for our coffee - an indulgence but one of few. After all, you have to reserve a few treats for yourself and that's one of ours. On the rare occasion we have bread, my wife bakes it from stone ground, whole wheat flour we buy from a local mill, but it's a rare treat indeed. Thankfully, we're not real dessert eaters although we "had" to have a pumpkin pie for Thanksgiving. Makes a great breakfast to go with our morning coffee.

Instead of sugar we use stevia which is a healthy, non-fattening plant product and a very little goes a long way as a sweetener. We eat no carbs after 2:00 p.m. and that includes fresh fruit which is part of our daily diet. Most of what we eat for dinner is grilled, to include fresh vegetables from our garden. We eat mostly boneless, skinless chicken breasts, also grilled, and extra virgin olive oil is our "drug of choice" in cooking. We also eat a lot of fish, salmon and talapia being primary but others as well. Our other sweetener is agave nectar which is a factor in our normal breakfast of a fruit smoothie which also features some flax oil. This does not mean that we don't eat beef, pork or loin lamb chops on occasion but we only use lean cuts and they, too, are grilled. Our diet is rounded out with plenty of salads with non-fat, no sugar vinaigrette dressings, most of which I make with a variety of vinegars, and tons of fresh greens and other veggies.

Eating this way, and stopping before we feel really full (that feeling comes a bit later), we can literally eat as much as we want and we never feel deprived. Everything tastes good and there's plenty of variety. Perhaps twice a month we'll eat out but we also watch what we order and don't stray too terribly far from healthy foods. My wife bought me a great Weber gas grill for last Father's Day. I love to use it and she loves the fact that I cook about six nights a week while she'll do the sides if I don't have veggies to grill. Vegetables she does on the stove are served without butter and often just lemon pepper for seasoning or some vinegar on greens such as fresh spinach or brussel sprouts. Summer squash, eggplant, asparagus, fresh tomatoes, peppers, fresh corn, etc. go on the grill.

We walk a lot and stay active around the house and yard while my wife also does water aerobics in season. It all combines to work for us and she's lost about 40 pounds. I had more to lose, and have.
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Old 11-25-2011, 07:54 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,967,079 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
Can't help you there. We still insist on 1/2&1/2 for our coffee - an indulgence but one of few. After all, you have to reserve a few treats for yourself and that's one of ours. On the rare occasion we have bread, my wife bakes it from stone ground, whole wheat flour we buy from a local mill, but it's a rare treat indeed. Thankfully, we're not real dessert eaters although we "had" to have a pumpkin pie for Thanksgiving. Makes a great breakfast to go with our morning coffee.

Instead of sugar we use stevia which is a healthy, non-fattening plant product and a very little goes a long way as a sweetener. We eat no carbs after 2:00 p.m. and that includes fresh fruit which is part of our daily diet. Most of what we eat for dinner is grilled, to include fresh vegetables from our garden. We eat mostly boneless, skinless chicken breasts, also grilled, and extra virgin olive oil is our "drug of choice" in cooking. We also eat a lot of fish, salmon and talapia being primary but others as well. Our other sweetener is agave nectar which is a factor in our normal breakfast of a fruit smoothie which also features some flax oil. This does not mean that we don't eat beef, pork or loin lamb chops on occasion but we only use lean cuts and they, too, are grilled. Our diet is rounded out with plenty of salads with non-fat, no sugar vinaigrette dressings, most of which I make with a variety of vinegars, and tons of fresh greens and other veggies.

Eating this way, and stopping before we feel really full (that feeling comes a bit later), we can literally eat as much as we want and we never feel deprived. Everything tastes good and there's plenty of variety. Perhaps twice a month we'll eat out but we also watch what we order and don't stray too terribly far from healthy foods. My wife bought me a great Weber gas grill for last Father's Day. I love to use it and she loves the fact that I cook about six nights a week while she'll do the sides if I don't have veggies to grill. Vegetables she does on the stove are served without butter and often just lemon pepper for seasoning or some vinegar on greens such as fresh spinach or brussel sprouts. Summer squash, eggplant, asparagus, fresh tomatoes, peppers, fresh corn, etc. go on the grill.

We walk a lot and stay active around the house and yard while my wife also does water aerobics in season. It all combines to work for us and she's lost about 40 pounds. I had more to lose, and have.
Great inspiration! I'm copying your post into Word and saving it on my desktop.

What is your procedure for grilling? And is it a pain to clean the gas grill after every use?
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Old 11-25-2011, 09:33 AM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,467,321 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Great inspiration! I'm copying your post into Word and saving it on my desktop.

What is your procedure for grilling? And is it a pain to clean the gas grill after every use?
My Weber goes from 0-500 in about five minutes to preheat. That's when I use a brush on and between the bars on the grill and it cleans them perfectly. Must take all of a minute. Once a month I pull the grills (split grill surface) and the flavor bars under the grills as well as the underneath, metal liner and throw them in the dishwasher. I'll also toss the aluminum grease catcher liner and put in a new one. Piece of cake. The grill has three burners - front, center and back - which is perfect for the two of us although we can also cook for a crowd. Turn off the center burner or any two burners (they're long, not round) and it's perfect for indirect grilling. Not only does it heat up quickly but the grilling is usually done with the lid closed and it hold a steady temperature that is easy to regulate. Most items cook perfectly in under 15 minutes - healthy, flavorful fast food.
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Old 11-25-2011, 10:52 AM
Status: "Support the Mining Law of 1872" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,570 posts, read 10,912,012 times
Reputation: 19190
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
Can't help you there. We still insist on 1/2&1/2 for our coffee - an indulgence but one of few.
Well, I hope so. The "Healthy" stuff, or even milk, is disgusting in coffee. I just got two pounds of Ethiopian Harrara from Starbucks. For that I'm using whipping cream. Harrara is never plentiful. It only stays in stock for a few days. The next time you cook Tuna Helper Alfredo, substitute 1/2 and 1/2 for milk. Add a dash if Tabasco, a 1/2 cup of dry vermouth, and some freshly ground pepper.

Scrambled eggs, soft with lots of butter, bechamel sauce, and gravy are all wonderful. I love macaroni and cheese with butter and Velveeta; but oddly I prefer milk to 1/2 and 1/2 in this case. Sometimes I omit the butter and lay bacon strips over the top.

There are those who eat to live; they're lean, mean, and and have sour dispositions from eating food they don't like. Then there are those of us who live to eat. We're fat and happy with joyful dispositions.

This woman eats a fat-free diet.




This woman eats wonderful, fat-filled foods.

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Old 11-25-2011, 11:23 AM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,467,321 times
Reputation: 29071
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
Well, I hope so. The "Healthy" stuff, or even milk, is disgusting in coffee. I just got two pounds of Ethiopian Harrara from Starbucks. For that I'm using whipping cream. Harrara is never plentiful. It only stays in stock for a few days. The next time you cook Tuna Helper Alfredo, substitute 1/2 and 1/2 for milk. Add a dash if Tabasco, a 1/2 cup of dry vermouth, and some freshly ground pepper.

Scrambled eggs, soft with lots of butter, bechamel sauce, and gravy are all wonderful. I love macaroni and cheese with butter and Velveeta; but oddly I prefer milk to 1/2 and 1/2 in this case. Sometimes I omit the butter and lay bacon strips over the top.

There are those who eat to live; they're lean, mean, and and have sour dispositions from eating food they don't like. Then there are those of us who live to eat. We're fat and happy with joyful dispositions.
We decidedly love to cook and to eat. We've simply found healthy ways to combine the two into delicious meals.

However, that first picture just destroyed my appetite. I hope it returns in time for the duck on the rotisserie for Christmas or, at the latest, the perfectly seasoned prime, Black Angus standing-rib roast on the grill for New Year's.

The only way I eat premature chickens is pickled and washed down with beer!
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Old 11-26-2011, 10:15 AM
 
Location: delaware
688 posts, read 863,966 times
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my retirement coincided within a year of becoming a widow, so i would say that living alone has had more impact on eating/cooking than retirement.

i like to eat but have always hated to cook, although in the 30+ years of marriage i did the cooking 98% of the time. in my forties, we entertained informally quite a bit, having people for dinner, dessert, etc. and cooking was just naturally a part of that life. although i never loved doing it, i liked having friends over, so i more or less accepted it. my husband helped when we entertained but i did the everyday cooking.

since i began living alone, i cook very little and i have to say i feel as if i've been released from prison. weight has never been a problem for me ( genetics i think ) and, if anything, i'm a little bit lighter by 5 pounds or so than i was when working. i've had diabetes type 2 for 17 years and am careful, though not obsessed with bread/potatoes, desserts, sweets, portion size,etc. i use some prepared food ( stouffer's ),also make some stews, large salads in summer, chilli, occasional broil a pork chop or make a vegetable lasagne which lasts forever. i often will go out to eat once or twice a week for lunch and make that my main meal. then for dinner will have salad or soup. i love the freedom of not having what i call a 1950s dinner- meat, vegetable, starch, salad, dessert, and the lack of prescription in meal preparation. when the significan other is here, i do a bit more- that's often when i make a meat loaf or spaghetti- but, again, that is not a daily routine.

my weight stays about the same and i'm careful about blood/ glucose levels, test daily, and am lab tested for that and cholesterol every four months. those levels have been very stable for the last 18 months.

i feel much freer with the cooking/eating routine i've establised and shudder at the thought of ever having to return to what i call routine hum drum cooking. i certainly realize that many people enjoy cooking and consider it creative, but i've never been one of them ; i always considered cooking a burden. so in my old age i don't expect to change nor do i choose to do so. i'm just very grateful that what i do now works for me; i hope it always will.

catsy girl
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Old 11-26-2011, 11:26 AM
Status: "Support the Mining Law of 1872" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,570 posts, read 10,912,012 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
...that first picture just destroyed my appetite!
I try to be helpful. But don't forget that Hillary Clinton has advanced the cause of women's equality in a very important way. Before Hillary people only referred to the boogey man. Today we are hearing boogey woman more and more.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
I hope it ( my appetite) returns in time for the duck on the rotisserie for Christmas or, at the latest, the perfectly seasoned prime, Black Angus standing-rib roast on the grill for New Year's. !
My mother cooked prime rib frequently; she cooked steaks very frequently. This is probably the reason I like sauces, complicated seasonings etc. The bare hunk of meat just doesn't do it for me. I may get in the mood for a prime rib roast occasionally, but never steak. I haven't eaten a steak in thirty years. They're strictly birthday, anniversary, and simply special treats for my dogs and cats. This is, however, strictly a matter of personal taste.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
The only way I eat premature chickens is pickled and washed down with beer!
I feel terrible for you.
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Old 11-26-2011, 11:41 AM
 
Location: Verde Valley AZ
8,611 posts, read 9,674,534 times
Reputation: 10950
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
I know mine sure have and I'm wondering if this is "natural" once you leave the rat race of work.

I despised my last year of work and did a good job of eating my way through it. Even though i walked to and from work, a total distance of four miles, I ended up gaining about 50 pounds and retired with every ounce of it. Good thing I retired two years earlier than planned or I'd have ended up a blimp!

Once we bought our retirement home and made our 2,000 mile move I did a lot of landscaping, put in raised garden beds and started cultivating fresh vegetables. That, along with other work around the place, resulted in losing 30 pounds during our first year here.

While we'd always eaten a balanced diet, this year we began a new, healthy diet regimen shunning most fats and all sugars. The end result has been the loss of another 30 pounds.

Have you stayed the same, gained or lost since retiring and to what do you attribute it. Perhaps there are those who would like to make some changes in either direction and would like to know what's worked for you.
I am one of those "eat to live" people who, if it wasn't absolutely necessary, I probably wouldn't. lol However, I DO love to cook! And I do eat what I want, when I want and enjoy it. I weigh the same as I did when I graduated from high school over 50 years ago...5'1" and a 'hefty' 110. I also have a high metabolism which probably helps a lot. And I don't take ANY prescription drugs that might affect the appetite. I eat one GOOD meal a day, whether breakfast, lunch or dinner, doesn't matter and then 'graze' if I'm hungry. I hardly ever feel really hungry though.

I eat NO fast food, very few processed foods, cook from scratch most of the time and everything in moderation. I haven't had a soda in years. I use little sugar, don't care for dessert type 'stuff', don't cook with salt, etc.. I grow a nice garden every year so have plenty of fresh veggies and have fruit trees as well.
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