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Unread 03-08-2012, 02:03 PM
 
Location: California Mountains
1,450 posts, read 1,022,267 times
Reputation: 2247
Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
It's going to be tough to find someone to "hang around with" during the daytime in retirement at age 49.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aquaboy View Post
49 is way too young to hang out all day with the dog and cat!
There is no need to hang around the house, play with the pets, or shoot the breeze with cronies if that's not what the OP wishes to do with his time.

When I left the work force at 48 (and 3 months), I went back to college, learned a new language (the third, not counting my mother tongue), then moved to another continent to live out one of my dreams. With my husband who retired three years later at 54, I travelled extensively, made friends with people from dozens of countries, and attempted to learn more languages. After seven years of that, we returned stateside and my husband worked part time on and off while I wrote and learned to knit. So far, my book has reached almost 80,000 words and there are 60+ knitted sweaters, hats, and scarves in my and my children's closets. Recently, a local pet shop proposed that I knit pets' sweaters for them to sale, but I have yet to make up my mind to do so.

Life does not become empty when one no longer holds a job.

Last edited by Ol' Wanderer; 03-08-2012 at 02:14 PM..
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Unread 03-08-2012, 06:23 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
20,938 posts, read 24,653,661 times
Reputation: 8101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aquaboy View Post
What sort of industry has forced retirement?...
The military is one, many PDs and FDs are also like this. Industries that need young men, and that assume that their employees will burn-out and become heavily disabled after a few decades.

At the pay-grade I made it to, they only allow a servicemember to stay Active for 20-years. Twenty years plus to the end of the following month and your OUT. No options to stay in longer. You are simply considered to be too elderly [and too broken] to keep up with the 18 to 24 year old kids.

A person can run hard and long for many years, accumulating torn ligaments here, busted rotators there, a few too many rads a few times, but after each injury if you can prove that you can continue to keep serving they let you. After so many years of it, they say 'no more. you're out'.

Forced and in-voluntary retirement.
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Unread 03-08-2012, 06:43 PM
 
39,289 posts, read 38,710,537 times
Reputation: 11427
Op hasn't come back ;but I know none that are based on 30 years service.Poice often retire sonner but that is because they go on to use skills in second priavte sector job that i have seen.
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Unread 03-08-2012, 09:26 PM
 
4,919 posts, read 8,312,298 times
Reputation: 5622
Quote:
Originally Posted by texdav View Post
I take it from the full pensio and nenefits that health insurance are covered.The concern OP posted about was just the age beign too young to retire fully.
Thats prety much it, I can't wrap myself around the retirement thing at this age. I know that I'll be retired and I know I will need to find things to occupy my time, just not sure if the transition will be easy or hard. I belive I will adjust well, but I know others who belived that also and had a very hard time adjusting.


Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
When I retired at 55, everyone I met was at least 65 and most older. It's going to be tough to find someone to "hang around with" during the daytime in retirement at age 49. That was my problem. At least you aren't in a financial vise.
Thats something I really didn't think about. Where I live we have this generation gap going on. Over 65, lots of folks, under 40 is the other group 40-65, not many of us.


As an FYI to others, without going in to details, my company has a mandatory 30 year retirement requirment. Also, due to treaty considerations, my pension and benefits are not subject to US taxes so long as I have no earned income in the US.
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Unread 03-08-2012, 10:17 PM
 
39,289 posts, read 38,710,537 times
Reputation: 11427
But still no info on exactly what you do;but it foreign work. But as now to adjust you have 3 years to think about anther job if you do not want to retire.
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Unread 03-08-2012, 10:40 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW / CO / SA TX / Thailand
9,997 posts, read 15,120,150 times
Reputation: 6796
I went out @ age 49 w/ 32 yrs of Service. It took me about 30 seconds to 'adjust' from a very engaging career with lots of International travel. I miss the 5 star hotels, first class seating, and business lounges, but I have relegated my travel status to 'grunt / sheep', and I still have a blast traveling a lot and taking classes. I have several volunteer gigs and am learning a few new trades / careers, as I plan to do international aid work (volunteer), as I will need to live overseas to afford healthcare till medicaid age.

In my many years of 'employment', I had a hard enough time taking the time out of my day for work. It was an 'afterthought' that got in the way of more important things. I added up my hours and found I had the equivalent of 99 yrs of 40 hr work weeks by age 49. It was time to leave that stuff behind.

(Farm kid / elder caregiver / provided for family when I was a young'n, worked lots of part-time jobs and built houses / commercial buildings in my free time & home schooled my kids).

Social stuff is not an issue for early retiree, there are plenty of 'trust-fund-babies' of various ages to play with.
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Unread 03-09-2012, 06:29 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
21,024 posts, read 15,126,306 times
Reputation: 29235
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ol' Wanderer View Post
There is no need to hang around the house, play with the pets, or shoot the breeze with cronies if that's not what the OP wishes to do with his time.

When I left the work force at 48 (and 3 months), I went back to college, learned a new language (the third, not counting my mother tongue), then moved to another continent to live out one of my dreams. With my husband who retired three years later at 54, I travelled extensively, made friends with people from dozens of countries, and attempted to learn more languages. After seven years of that, we returned stateside and my husband worked part time on and off while I wrote and learned to knit. So far, my book has reached almost 80,000 words and there are 60+ knitted sweaters, hats, and scarves in my and my children's closets. Recently, a local pet shop proposed that I knit pets' sweaters for them to sale, but I have yet to make up my mind to do so.

Life does not become empty when one no longer holds a job.
I do things too. I take classes. I teach a class. I belong to a book group. I have a photography hobby and belong to 2 camera clubs and I do road trips solo. (I don't shop.) The issue is basically everyone retired I come in contact with related to those activities I like is older than I am and there is a generation gap. I suspect it will be better socially when I hit 65 and more people my age are retired and home in the daytime. At 55 I didn't have much in common (except for the activity) with the 65 - 85 year olds with whom I spend most of my time. I just want the 49 year old retiree to think about it especially if they are big on socializing. During their former work hours (daytime), when the 49 year old will be looking for things to do and people to pal around with there will only be two major groups of people at home: the over 65 year olds with whom they won't have much in common and the unemployed who won't be able to afford to do things with them that cost money.
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Unread 03-09-2012, 05:20 PM
 
Location: Lexington, SC
4,281 posts, read 3,733,077 times
Reputation: 3376
Quote:
Originally Posted by PacificFlights View Post
Was at a retirment party for a co-worker when someone reminded me that my party will probably be the next one for our center.

I started at this job when I was 19, been here 27 years, and company has a mandatory 30 year reteirment. So I will be 49 in 3 years and forced into reteirment. I will have full pension, benefits and such, so sitting back on the lanai sipping ice tea and watching the clouds go by isn't going to be a problem, BUT... I am just too young to be retired. Just the thought makes me uneasy...

Has anyone else been in a forced retriement situation and did you:
1. Transition into retriment without any problems.
2. Had a very hard time transitioning.
3. Couldn't transition and had to find work.

I;m not really sure how I will take it especially since I never did this retirement thing before and I guess being reminded of it was kinda like sudden icy water in the hot shower.
Do not wait. Tomorrow, commence interviewing and/or preparing for your next job outside your present company.
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Unread 03-12-2012, 05:36 PM
Status: ":)" (set 7 days ago)
 
4,146 posts, read 2,547,881 times
Reputation: 1481
Lol, you can always do other stuff. Why is there a 30 year limit with his company?

Why not do some of your hobbies?


Quote:
Originally Posted by PacificFlights View Post
Was at a retirment party for a co-worker when someone reminded me that my party will probably be the next one for our center.

I started at this job when I was 19, been here 27 years, and company has a mandatory 30 year reteirment. So I will be 49 in 3 years and forced into reteirment. I will have full pension, benefits and such, so sitting back on the lanai sipping ice tea and watching the clouds go by isn't going to be a problem, BUT... I am just too young to be retired. Just the thought makes me uneasy...

Has anyone else been in a forced retriement situation and did you:
1. Transition into retriment without any problems.
2. Had a very hard time transitioning.
3. Couldn't transition and had to find work.

I;m not really sure how I will take it especially since I never did this retirement thing before and I guess being reminded of it was kinda like sudden icy water in the hot shower.
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Unread 03-12-2012, 05:54 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
20,938 posts, read 24,653,661 times
Reputation: 8101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Info Guy View Post
Lol, you can always do other stuff. Why is there a 30 year limit with his company?
???

Why do some employers have a 20 year HYT?
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