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Old 11-26-2013, 02:39 PM
 
Location: Idaho
4,637 posts, read 4,479,613 times
Reputation: 9076

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cheektowaga_Chester View Post
Folks, the fact of the matter is, the overwhelming majority of retirees DON'T relocate.

It's expensive
Away from family
Away from friends
New doctors
New familiarities
New norms
Often new culture
The parts in your post, that are in bold type font . . . I sure do hope you are right! I would be so very disappointed if I could not experience new things and new places in retirement. If not, then I should just keep on working where I am, keep working until I drop. No, I'm looking forward to a retirement of adventure and new experiences. You will rarely find me plopped in an easy-chair watching the "idiot box", and certainly not all day, every day. There's too much to do.

Doctors and the expense. I don't see those as being an issue.


I still have right at four years before I retire, and have been researching areas the past year. Next month, I'll be taking a two-week road trip to the location that I am primarily interested in settling. During the middle of winter! So that I can experience just how harsh and brutal it is during the coldest and most precipitated season they experience.

I know that I can handle the summers fine, as that is when most of my visits occurred. Wonderful place, in the summer. But winter? If I can't endure the winters, then I need to look elsewhere.

The other factor that will require a difficult decision is if I want to continue play in tennis leagues. If I decide that being able to participate in league tennis is "that" important to me, then I can throw out a whole state from consideration. That's sad because the state is practically perfect in pretty much every other way.
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Old 11-26-2013, 03:00 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,695 posts, read 49,488,800 times
Reputation: 19146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cheektowaga_Chester View Post
Folks, the fact of the matter is, the overwhelming majority of retirees DON'T relocate.

It's expensive
Away from family
Away from friends
New doctors
New familiarities
New norms
Often new culture
The only reason for it to be 'expensive' is if you choose a place where it is expensive. I see no reason for a retirement move to be anymore expensive than any other move. We have moved dozens of times, the costs of moving never really changed much. For retirement, we moved to a low Cost-Of-Living region, so for us it has been a financial benefit.

I moved away from my family in the 70s. It was a common ritual of becoming an adult: going to college, following your career.

I make new friends everywhere I go. It is handy to be friendly

I have never been able to hold on to a PCP during my career. I transfer, they transfer. Since retiring I have been in one place for the longest time of my adulthood, and I am on my third PCP. They keep transferring.

I have said many times, since we moved here, this sub-culture suits us much better, than most of those where we have lived previously.



In my career field, nearly everyone relocates for their retirement. To find someone who stays at the same place, would be an oddity.
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Old 11-26-2013, 07:20 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,756,785 times
Reputation: 32309
Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
I make new friends everywhere I go. It is handy to be friendly

In my career field, nearly everyone relocates for their retirement. To find someone who stays at the same place, would be an oddity.
You were in the military, so moving every few years was just normal for you. Packing up is just something you do, and you damn well better be able to make new friends, etc.

But for lots of the rest of us, moving is more daunting on several different levels. I chose where to go to graduate school (Los Angeles area). Then after that I chose where to look for a full-time job (Los Angeles area). Then when I was in my fifties I chose where I wanted to live after retirement (Los Angeles area). Now at age 69, I do not regret any of those choices.

And no, I'm not too lazy to move, although it's a lot of work: Since 1969 I've lived in seven different places in the Los Angeles area.

In case people are thinking, well, Escort Rider is afflicted with inertia; he just can't break out of his rut and make any changes, that's not true. I have made major lifestyle changes because of changes in hobbies - hobbies that I participated in with huge gobs of time, hobbies that required long learning curves and that required lots of specialized equipment (such as motorcycling).

Some of us really like it where we have been for a long time. However, I can readily understand the excitement and sense of anticipation of those who really want to relocate. I have no quarrel with them. My point was that career military people do not choose (for the most part) where they are going to live, so yes, the last assignment will probably not be the place you really want to stay.

Others have been "stuck" in a place because of their jobs. High-paying jobs tend to be clustered in large cities. So now all of a sudden (at retirement) there is this marvelous freedom to choose. I am just saying I had already "chosen", way back in 1966 when I started graduate school at UCLA.
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Old 11-26-2013, 08:40 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,999,418 times
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Face it; like when younger some make friends easier than others. We all read younger people who just for some reason attract no friends.I guess its more personally type and being out going versus introvert. I think I often sense it just looking at a person in say a coffee shop and whether to start a conversation or not.Some just are at ease and out going while others are not.
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Old 11-27-2013, 07:20 AM
 
Location: Wherever I happen to be at the moment
1,229 posts, read 1,139,528 times
Reputation: 1836
Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
I see no reason for a retirement move to be anymore expensive than any other move. We have moved dozens of times, the costs of moving never really changed much.

In my career field, nearly everyone relocates for their retirement. To find someone who stays at the same place, would be an oddity.
Perhaps it's just a wee bit more expensive for people who aren't in the military and for whom Uncle Sam isn't footing the bill.

Upon retirement the military pays for a final move either to your home of record or up to an equivalent distance from your final duty station.

Full disclosure might be helpful to those who aren't similarly situated.

Don't bother thanking me. My pleasure!
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Old 11-27-2013, 07:47 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,695 posts, read 49,488,800 times
Reputation: 19146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghostly1 View Post
Perhaps it's just a wee bit more expensive for people who aren't in the military and for whom Uncle Sam isn't footing the bill.

Upon retirement the military pays for a final move either to your home of record or up to an equivalent distance from your final duty station.

Full disclosure might be helpful to those who aren't similarly situated.

Don't bother thanking me. My pleasure!
When I retired, I was living overseas. The government paid to get me back stateside.

Then we began shopping for land to retire onto, later after we bought it then we moved.

I footed the bill for my retirement move.

When you try to provide full disclosure try to be accurate. No need to thank me for correcting you.
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Old 11-27-2013, 08:36 AM
 
29,809 posts, read 34,894,042 times
Reputation: 11730
As with many things in life to transplant or not transplant or how many times to do it is personal and what is great for one might not be for another. There are a lot of factors that go into how well it works out or the reasons for doing it that it is often very difficult for others to understand. Especially those who think you left them behind and can't fully understand/appreciate why you are so happy being away from. They don't understand it is not necessarily about being away from but being at. We were suppose to travel North today to be with family and friends in the Mid Atlantic for the holidays. Weather has delayed our multiple stop trip but it also makes us appreciate normally missing the weather. My sons and their families will move at the drop of a hat and one has gone East Coast to West and back again all because of job opportunities. The other moved multiple states for job opportunity and a different environment. It has worked out well for all as has our retirement move. Will we move again YES!
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Old 11-27-2013, 10:09 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,695 posts, read 49,488,800 times
Reputation: 19146
Renting a U-haul, loading the U-haul, driving, paying for fuel and tolls, locating a new place, and paying deposit on your next home [or buying a new place], moving into it; I think all costs about the same stateside. Regardless of which state you move from, or to.

Of course in my profession, I was able to submit for reimbursement, and 3 to 4 months later my expenses were reimbursed. I still had to front the expenses out of my pocket. I wish I could get reimbursement for our last move.

There was one move we did from overseas, back stateside, where the moving company crated our furniture, appliances, clothing, etc. Then during the move they dipped the crates into ocean water at some point. The crates then sat in a warehouse for 3 months before they scheduled delivery. Nothing was re-usable after that. The insurance claim agreed to pay for any items that we still had original receipts for, and we got 40cents back for every dollar of original purchase, on the stuff that was destroyed. That was a very costly move for us. Even though movers did it all, it was the most expensive move we ever did. We lost everything we owned except for clothes we had in carry-on luggage.
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Old 12-01-2013, 10:05 AM
 
197 posts, read 264,603 times
Reputation: 114
We were planning to retire where we are, since we had been here for a long time. Relatives in area, Mom in a nursing home. Then we made the mistake of visiting our son in Washington state. I fell in love with the whole NW feeling. It is totally different than where we live. We decided to make the move out there. We are catching flack from his side of the family, but mine say go for it. I have spent the last five years looking, weighing, and narrowed it down to two places. This will be a major move and our last. But a few of the places we visited (not to mention the relatives of our daughter-in-law) make you feel very welcome. We will rent first and decide where to build. Look into EVERYTHING about your chosen place. It helps to go to forums that showcase where you want to be. You get feedback from people that live there. Do flyovers of the area you want to be and check the future plans for there. It will be stressful but exciting. No more just existing to work and please everyone but us.
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Old 12-01-2013, 11:46 AM
 
29,809 posts, read 34,894,042 times
Reputation: 11730
There is another side to moving/not moving from friends and families as we age. Our relationships and bonds can remain strong but our experiences can change/evolve. We will probably not age the same or maintain health the same. Our finances may become different and our kids who grew up together move through adulthood differently. Shared goals and aspirations at age 45 can have different realities at 65. Sometimes moving on with life is inevitable whether you move or not. Vacations once taken together can because of health and finances become just memories for some. I am dealing with this now, great visit and great friends but lives have changed.
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