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Old 09-30-2007, 06:35 AM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
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We've been searching through retirement spots for a little more than a year now--thought we'd share two that we like so far.

Hot Springs Village, Arkansas. Pros: Beautiful golf community. Large, active retirement village with lakes, gyms, and a theater as part of the HOA. They seem to take good care of the roads and the property, which is about 25 years old. Residents seem very happy--we talked to quite a few and were surprised by the number of rave reviews. Good medical facilities nearby, and Arkansas is a very inexpensive place to live. Cons: You really are in the middle of nowhere here. Long drive to get to a major airport (Little Rock). Hot summers and insect problem in the summer.

The Villages in Florida.
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Old 09-30-2007, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
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Sorry to cut that post short--had to answer the phone.

Anyway, we also like the Villages, which are about an hour north of Orlando, FL. The people there are incredibly vibrant and active. There seems to be plenty to do, and a very welcoming attitude. The town is really cute! Stores and medical facilities are very good. I could see us living there, even though it seems a little pricey, and Florida scenery isn't quite our cup of tea (we like bigger trees and land that isn't quite so flat). Cons: Wind storms and lightning are problems. Hot summers. Small lakes, and you're a long drive to the ocean.
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Old 09-30-2007, 05:57 PM
 
Location: Oregon Coast
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Hot Springs village is that in the city of Hot Springs Arkansas? It's been a while but I have looked up homes sales in Hot Springs and found it very reasonable. I'd like to take a visit out that way sometime.
What I'd really like is to take a vacation and go all through the south to see what it's like.
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Old 10-01-2007, 10:07 PM
 
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Personally, I'd consider Hot Springs long before the Villages in Florida. We were down in Orlando around Christmas and it was the Villages that got hit with a tornado. It took out quite a few homes. That little on-going issue in Florida (tornados), along with their insurance problem ($$$$$$) and a few other things I didn't care for in the region would send (and did send) me elsewhere.

Of course, Arkansas also has tornados. That might not be an issue for you but it was for us. Everyone has their thing, so if it's not a big deal for you it may be a good place.

BTW, have you also considered Bella Vista up in the northeast part of Arkansas. It's also reasonable, masterplanned (if you like the HOA thing and associated fees), has private lakes in the community, and is closer to bigger town amenities in Bentonville.

It's also a closer drive to the midwest entertainment capitol of Branson, MO, if you like that kind of venue. It might be a reason to be a little further north in Arkansas.
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Old 10-02-2007, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
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I'm glad you brought this up--Hot Springs Village, in fact, does NOT have a problem with tornadoes. My parents have lived there since the 1970s, and the tornadoes just seem to pass around them because they're sheltered by the Ouachita Mountains. They have problems with lightning and occasional ice storms, but have never had any wind-related problems.
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Old 10-02-2007, 08:33 AM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
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To answer Waterlily's question, Hot Springs Village is about a 45 minute drive from Hot Springs. It's a scenic drive, but you definitely need to drive to get to anything that could remotely be considered a city. There is shopping in and directly around the Village. It is a humongous place that stretches over two counties. Both HSV and Bella Vista were built by Cooper. I like HSV better because they learned from building the Bella Vista property. (The differences are small--things like the roads are better designed in HSV, and the community facilities are more diverse. Bella Vista is all about golf. HSV has other kinds of recreational facilities.)
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Old 10-02-2007, 04:42 PM
 
Location: home...finally, home .
8,235 posts, read 18,505,219 times
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Hot Springs village is that in the city of Hot Springs Arkansas? It's been a while but I have looked up homes sales in Hot Springs and found it very reasonable

Is that the place that Eric Estrada "Chips" advertises?
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Old 10-03-2007, 09:38 PM
 
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Default Just an answer to one statement

Quote:
Originally Posted by normie View Post
I'm glad you brought this up--Hot Springs Village, in fact, does NOT have a problem with tornadoes.
Please excuse me for a quick diversion, a related diversion but a diversion just the same. Here's some information about that common myth or misconseption that's been around for years. It's a cut 'n paste (bolding & color added for emphasis) from the link I've provided to the entire article. It's immediately following the quote:
The idea that one's town is "protected" is a combination of wishful thinking, short memory, the rarity of tornadoes, and a distorted sense of "here" and "there." Proof of protection has been offered by a very simple statement of fact. The town has never been hit by a tornado, but 10 tornadoes have touched down "outside" of town in the past 30 years. The occurrence information may be fact, but the conclusion that the town must be "protected" does not logically follow.
That logic disregards some very basic ideas. It ignores the likely possibility that rivers, ridges, and valleys have little or no effect on mature tornadoes. Tornadoes have passed seemingly unaffected over mountain ridges 3,000 feet high. Dozens have crossed the Mississippi River, from Minnesota to Louisiana. Both sides of the river, at the confluence of the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers, near St. Louis, have seen devastating tornadoes.
Topography may have some influence, but protection is not one of them. Weak tornadoes may damage hilltops. But well-formed, mature tornadoes may actually stretch themselves into valleys and intensify. During this vortex stretching, the funnel diameter may shrink in diameter and the tornado will spin even more rapidly. This is hardly what one would call protection for buildings in a valley.
The belief that tornadoes don't hit "here," but always seem to hit "north of town" or "south of the river" ignores some very simple mathematics. "Here" may be a small town with an area of one square mile. Just "outside of town" or "there" or "to the north" may be anywhere within visual sighting from the water tower, perhaps 10 miles in all directions. Therefore, if the town has an area of one square mile, then "outside of town" has an area of over 300 square miles. A tornado touchdown is 300 times more likely "outside" of town than in-town. The "protection" of the town does not come from hills, or a mound, or the joining of two rivers. Tornado protection comes from the same source as our protection from falling comets or other heavenly visitors .... that afforded by the laws of probability .... the very low probability of rare events such as tornadoes.
Click here for the entire article from "The Tornado Project" myth page. The same info is also available at the NOAA website and others like Wikipedia.

Now that we know they can hit in either place, let's get some more info for the OP about Hot Springs and The Villages.

Last edited by garth; 10-03-2007 at 09:55 PM..
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Old 10-04-2007, 01:03 AM
 
Location: Prospect, KY
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I live in So. California near the beach (an area not known for tornadoes) - they are rare, but we have had small tornadoes here that have taken off roofs, felled large mature trees and taken out power for many hours - tornadoes can happen just about any place.
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Old 10-04-2007, 05:49 AM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
15,400 posts, read 25,815,911 times
Reputation: 18992
Erik Estrada? Doesn't he usually push new developments? Hot Springs Village has been around since the 70's. There isn't much new construction there any more, except maybe on the north end.

As for the tornado question, I suppose you're right, that a large storm can go right over a mountain, or anywhere at all. Doesn't change the fact that I've been watching windstorms come and go for decades there. The Oauchita Mountains tend to divert them.

I think it's like pointing out that it can snow in Florida... yes, that's true but snow is not something to worry about if you're thinking about moving there. But don't get me wrong--HSV is not a weather paradise. Ice storms are a problem. Their house was struck by lightning on two different occasions (more than20 years apart, but still...). They once felt a jolt from an earthquake. The summer heat is VERY oppressive--that's the weather problem you should worry about.
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