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Old 03-17-2009, 10:37 PM
 
1,569 posts, read 3,086,739 times
Reputation: 924

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wisteria View Post
Hi Dancingearth. I can't remember what the shiny stuff was -- it was some kind of transparent thing. I have a handout at home that has it on there, so I'll look it up later. I don't know how well the butterfly shows up on your computer -- and it is a bit distorted because I tossed the canvas onto the floor and stood away from it to take the photo -- thinking I'd have more chances to get a good shot -- then the camera broke! Oh, well.

I'm not sure what you mean about the variations in the butterfly -- I'm very detail-oriented when it comes to drawing, so I tend to really look closely at what is there. This was painting, though, so a bit difficult for me, but I used metallic paint for the marks within the orange on the wings. Ironically, the teacher wanted to make my shapes "symmetrical" on my butterfly, and she took a paintbrush with black on it and tried to reshape my shapes. I stopped her in mid-air and I showed her the photo and pointed out that the shapes were not symmetrical, and the black was not a solid black. She hadn't noticed that, and immediately backed away, and said, "Oh, I didn't see that!" So, I had to go back in and "mess" up a few things to make it look more natural. Oh, well, it was still a learning process, and I felt for not knowing what I was doing, that it turned out better than I thought it would.I'm at work ... what's new...so I'd better go. See you later!
I was referring to the different colors in the butterfly. I tend to paint like I'm coloring in the lines or a paint by number. Awful. Your story reminds me of a pot I was glazing at the studio. After I had covered it with red oxide another student told me it was going to be really ugly! Then she saw I was wiping it off--it was one time I knew what I was doing.

Nothing much new here Suffering from allergies and getting tax stuff together. I was pretty happy with the punched tin doors on my TV cabinet that just took me all winter to punch. And my first daffodil bloomed today. Here's a picture of both and the little pot that was going to be ugly Yeah Spring!
Attached Thumbnails
Men and Women retiring alone to a new city/state -- where will you go and why?-img_1475.jpg   Men and Women retiring alone to a new city/state -- where will you go and why?-img_1407.jpg   Men and Women retiring alone to a new city/state -- where will you go and why?-img_1409.jpg   Men and Women retiring alone to a new city/state -- where will you go and why?-img_1338.jpg  

 
Old 03-17-2009, 10:56 PM
 
5,090 posts, read 13,554,912 times
Reputation: 6928
janb,

Thank you for the link for the Veteran's Home. I am somewhat aware of the benefits and care available because I have do get treatment at the VA in Denver. I only use it sparingly now, as I have better care and service through Kaiser.

One problem I have with Veteran's care is that there is always some loudmouth who wants to talk about his army experience, as it is the only topic in life, worth mentioning. I have been to many VA hospitals and there is always someone walking around with the hat, the pins, the vest, looking to have a conversation, with him only talking, about the military. I really do not want to talk continually about my military service.

It seems to be the habit of the lower educated veterans who think that because they were in the military they are something so special and everyone has to listen to their blowhard stories. Well, I have my own bull stories, but I do not want to bore people all the time. It was a long time ago for me, for the army, and it even makes me sick, to hear myself talk, about the same old tales. It was only three years out of my life. Yes, it was interesting and unique but who wants to hear that all the time. I had a relative who talked continually about World War II, you know one of those "Archie Bunker" types, that was enough.

I was a in-hospital patient at a few VA hospitals, Military Hospitals and in residency at a VA domiciliary, for a short period, that was built during the Civil War. I was some idea of the environment. The links you provided surprised me; I did not know that some were so new and modern.

It is nice to know that I may have some options, but care is based on being indigent, and it would take me a long time to spend myself down to that level. Maybe I need to get a young girl, for a few months--that will get me to poverty, real fast.--or a heart attack.

Livecontent

Last edited by livecontent; 03-17-2009 at 11:37 PM..
 
Old 03-17-2009, 10:59 PM
 
1,569 posts, read 3,086,739 times
Reputation: 924
Quote:
Originally Posted by mmhere View Post
Haven't followed all the posts ... just jumping in here. I've been researching cohousing, intentional communities, and small houses for several years in anticipation of finding somewhere I can retire. I'm 55, single, no kids, living on a fixed income, don't own a house.

Cohousing communities vary in flavor. In general, they are too expensive for me, plus there's a tendency to try and make everything look the same to save construction expenses, etc. I'm sold on the small house movement -- anything less than 1,200 square feet. Belong to a group specializing in this -- green, very energy efficient, comfortable, quite a variety of ways to go, and AFFORDABLE.

Low cost to me is well under $100,000, even $50,000. Very nice small homes. Cost less money so I'll have more to spend on other things. Also small means less to clean!

So you get an idea of what I mean (not a shack), check out this page, only one of many, many sites where people can get plans for small homes.

Here's a group that sponsors a mailing list where I've learned TONS of great information.

I'd like to live in some sort of community of people where we are like neighbors, look out for each other, help each other out -- much like cohousing. If I had my druthers, I'd like it to be all women (or couples) who are 50+, no kids, but grandkids and others can visit. Need my own place, but would be nice to come together regularly for some meals, gardening, projects.

I'm in Northern California where real estate is expensive and planning and zoning rules are restrictive. I'd like to live in a rural area, perhaps a small town close to a large university. I've always lived in California, but am willing to try living in a different climate as long as there is water close by -- ocean, lake, river. Probably wouldn't go for places like Vermont due to heavy snowfall, but wouldn't mind a place that has more rain. Usually, the weather here is great, but the 100+ summers just kill me.

I haven't considered getting any government subsidizing for this sort of thing because it takes so long and has too many restrictions. I believe that, as a society, we will be moving away from inefficient McMansions toward smaller homes out of necessity. It also makes homes more affordable to more people so they don't have to go into foreclosure.

Many times people purchase an acreage that backs up to an area where a wildlife and/or greenbelt exists. People have bought land that already had several structures, then rehabbed what was there to suit a number of residents. Right now my friends are talking about purchasing a mobile home or RV park to avoid problems with zoning and planning. There are lots of ideas that will suit lots of different people.

Many other criteria, but this is good for a start.


Cheers!
Marganne
Welcome mmhere. I have many of these things in my house now but definitely not $50,000. (I wish.) I really like my little 1,100 sq ft home and even find it a little more space than I need (3 bedrooms, 2 baths--the design uses space very well.) I don't know why anyone needs these big houses, especially if they have no hobbies! I needed a bedroom and a garage just for my hobbies.

I just picked up Creating a Life Together: Practical Tools to Grow Ecovillages and Intentional Communities by Diana Leafe Christian from the library. Have you read it? My neighbor and I are in the same boat and know we need to do something other than each own our own homes. I think I'll sign off and begin reading.
 
Old 03-18-2009, 11:29 AM
 
Location: DC Area, for now
3,517 posts, read 12,056,954 times
Reputation: 2141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dancingearth View Post
Welcome mmhere. I have many of these things in my house now but definitely not $50,000. (I wish.) I really like my little 1,100 sq ft home and even find it a little more space than I need (3 bedrooms, 2 baths--the design uses space very well.) I don't know why anyone needs these big houses, especially if they have no hobbies! I needed a bedroom and a garage just for my hobbies.
Status. Pure and simple. My kahunas are bigger than yours

A good, efficient design is critical for comfortable small houses. The amount of space that is wasted or too specific is amazing in houses. I once had a very large house. It had two beautiful fireplaces and a wonderful kitchen, great light, beautiful setting. But it was soooo much work to clean it and that was with very little furniture in it. I learned something from that.

I need enough space to include some hobby space but not so much that it is silly. My work spaces need to be very well designed and I need a resting and office space that can be the same room. I also want a nice bedroom that is big enough not be crowded but not so large that it is cavernous. There also needs to be a guest bedroom. I need good light and cross ventilation. So, a well designed 3 bedroom should do very nicely. I want a yard because I love to garden. My current house is about 1800 sq ft and it still has a fair amount of unneeded space. Some of it is just too inefficient - that is where good design comes in.

I'm attracted to older houses and have been thinking a lot about making my next one an older house in good condition. I've lived in new houses and they don't really stop the work that is needed. New construction is usually so crummy that there are a lot of nasty surprises that you discover. At least the older houses have substance and classic design.

I like your pics.
 
Old 03-18-2009, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,991,724 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dancingearth View Post
Welcome mmhere. I have many of these things in my house now but definitely not $50,000. (I wish.) I really like my little 1,100 sq ft home and even find it a little more space than I need (3 bedrooms, 2 baths--the design uses space very well.) I don't know why anyone needs these big houses, especially if they have no hobbies! I needed a bedroom and a garage just for my hobbies.

I just picked up Creating a Life Together: Practical Tools to Grow Ecovillages and Intentional Communities by Diana Leafe Christian from the library. Have you read it? My neighbor and I are in the same boat and know we need to do something other than each own our own homes. I think I'll sign off and begin reading.
The intentional communities in New England all very pricey, for those in very comfortable circumstances. Not only are the prices quite high, but there's the prop taxes and community fees. If it's a 55+ community, it's rather homogenous...and boomer-idealist, which can be either a good thing or grating. And the kids...little and teens...and consensus on every decision, etc.

LiveContent and others on this thread have the right idea about small houses near good transp. My situation is that I have such a small house, all on one floor, on a bus route that takes 10 min. to get to the next town (a university town). My problem? Rapidly rising prop taxes!! And a real sense of isolation from others. At night, I can't just walk outside to get to anything, so when home I''m confined here pretty much, unless I want to drive the highway to town. Plus, the endless endless 5 months or more of cold, snow, ice, grey. But by far the biggest worry is the prop taxes I cant' even imagine what they'll be in 5 or 10 years. Affordability is the major thing we're all talking about. Secondarily is being in a supportive community. But how to find that, without the high costs (and hidden costs) and numbers of people that may or may not be who we really want to live with?

I don't know about men, but as a woman of a certain age, I want comraderie and support without too much "in-your-face" community, the kind you may get with co-housing. But again, it's cost cost cost that must be borne over the next 10 years...can I/we afford whatever option we choose?
 
Old 03-18-2009, 12:37 PM
 
Location: DC Area, for now
3,517 posts, read 12,056,954 times
Reputation: 2141
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
I don't know about men, but as a woman of a certain age, I want comraderie and support without too much "in-your-face" community, the kind you may get with co-housing. But again, it's cost cost cost that must be borne over the next 10 years...can I/we afford whatever option we choose?
This is what I think I want too. Too much control over me and I will bristle. I do not want high school cliques again! But neither do I want isolation.
 
Old 03-18-2009, 03:07 PM
 
Location: Sarasota Florida
1,236 posts, read 3,610,121 times
Reputation: 1230
Cool This about sums it up !

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tesaje View Post
This is what I think I want too. Too much control over me and I will bristle. I do not want high school cliques again! But neither do I want isolation.


This is exactly how I feel, having reached an age where I'm finally "in control" and don't have to be submissive to someone else's choices. Therefore, it's most important to me to continue my independence for as long as I'm able and that's why I would not consider sharing my living space with anyone.

TV's Golden Girls looked like lots of fun for all....... but in reality..... I wonder

I'm also in the position of having to get in my car and drive: 1-mile to the supermarket, 8-miles to Fitness Center in Grants Pass, 20-miles to Medford, & the Mall, 30-miles to Ashland, 90-miles to the coast ETC.

I miss living in the heart of a mid-sized town and walking to everything
 
Old 03-18-2009, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Edina, MN, USA
6,955 posts, read 7,398,977 times
Reputation: 16293
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tesaje View Post
This is what I think I want too. Too much control over me and I will bristle. I do not want high school cliques again! But neither do I want isolation.
Like she said
 
Old 03-18-2009, 05:46 PM
 
Location: Sacramento, CA, USA
84 posts, read 191,480 times
Reputation: 52
Talking Cohousing options

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dancingearth View Post
Welcome mmhere. I have many of these things in my house now but definitely not $50,000. (I wish.) I really like my little 1,100 sq ft home and even find it a little more space than I need (3 bedrooms, 2 baths--the design uses space very well.) I don't know why anyone needs these big houses, especially if they have no hobbies! I needed a bedroom and a garage just for my hobbies.

I just picked up Creating a Life Together: Practical Tools to Grow Ecovillages and Intentional Communities by Diana Leafe Christian from the library. Have you read it? My neighbor and I are in the same boat and know we need to do something other than each own our own homes. I think I'll sign off and begin reading.
I haven't read it, but know of it. I belong to a mailing list that includes many of the cohousing projects throughout the world plus lots of people who help to put projects together, including developers. It's very attractive to me (once I got past my prior bias about cohousing). It was very upsetting when we finally got to the bottom of why some cohousers wouldn't want to share a community with small homes. They think of them as Katrina Cottages that will lower their property values. Funny thing -- for those places who have combined different sizes, property values haven't suffered. Perception is everything.

The mailing list is sponsored the the national Cohousing Association at yahoo or google groups. If you want to subscribe and check it out, you probably can find a link to the list from the cohousing web site. If not, just ask me and I'll dig a post out and send it on over. I spent the first 3 years on the list just reading and absorbing and learning without posting.

Cheers!
Marganne
 
Old 03-18-2009, 06:21 PM
 
Location: Sacramento, CA, USA
84 posts, read 191,480 times
Reputation: 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tesaje View Post
Status. Pure and simple. My kahunas are bigger than yours

A good, efficient design is critical for comfortable small houses. The amount of space that is wasted or too specific is amazing in houses. I once had a very large house. It had two beautiful fireplaces and a wonderful kitchen, great light, beautiful setting. But it was soooo much work to clean it and that was with very little furniture in it. I learned something from that.

I need enough space to include some hobby space but not so much that it is silly. My work spaces need to be very well designed and I need a resting and office space that can be the same room. I also want a nice bedroom that is big enough not be crowded but not so large that it is cavernous. There also needs to be a guest bedroom. I need good light and cross ventilation. So, a well designed 3 bedroom should do very nicely. I want a yard because I love to garden. My current house is about 1800 sq ft and it still has a fair amount of unneeded space. Some of it is just too inefficient - that is where good design comes in.

I'm attracted to older houses and have been thinking a lot about making my next one an older house in good condition. I've lived in new houses and they don't really stop the work that is needed. New construction is usually so crummy that there are a lot of nasty surprises that you discover. At least the older houses have substance and classic design.

I like your pics.
If you'd like to know more about the latest energy efficient, sustainable, green small house design being made today, check out the web site of the Small House Society. There is a page that has links to individually designed and manufactured design homes of various sizes, plus floor plans and names of equipment designed specifically for smaller homes. I could spend hours looking through all the links to see all the innovation! I like the modulars the best because I can start small. If I find I need more room, it's not hard to ad on another module connected to the first one.

I, too, must have a garden. What I'd look forward to is having a community garden we can share and work on together. One of the great things about living in community is many things can be located centrally instead of everyone having one lawn mower or shovel or washing machine or whatever people agree on. Many communities construct a workshop where people can share materials and tools to build whatever it is you build.

Cheers!
Marganne
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